Chikubayama Masakuni

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Chikubayama Masakuni
竹葉山 真邦
Personal information
Born Tazaki Makoto
(1957-08-21) August 21, 1957 (age 60)
Ukiha, Fukuoka, Japan
Height 1.76 m (5 ft 9 in)
Weight 116 kg (256 lb; 18.3 st)
Career
Stable Miyagino
Record 442-402-21
Debut March, 1973
Highest rank Maegashira 13 (September 1986)
Retired January, 1989
Championships 1 (Jūryō)
* Up to date as of July 2008.

Chikubayama Masakuni (born August 21, 1957 as Makoto Tazaki) is a former sumo wrestler from Ukiha, Fukuoka, Japan. He made his professional debut in 1973, breaking into the top makuuchi division thirteen years later in 1986. His highest rank was maegashira 13. After retiring in 1989 he became an elder of the Japan Sumo Association. He is the head coach of the Miyagino stable and his most successful wrestler is yokozuna Hakuhō.

Career[edit]

He did sumo from a young age but played baseball at junior high school as there was no sumo team available. He joined Miyagino stable after graduation. His ring name (shikona) was named after former yokozuna Yoshibayama, his stablemaster, [1] and it also references Chikugo, Fukuoka. His active career was relatively modest. He made his professional debut in March 1973 (alongside future sekiwake Kōbōyama), using his real name of Tazaki as his shikona. In March 1974 upon promotion to the sandanme division he became Chikubayama. He first reached sekitori status in November 1978 when he was promoted to the jūryō division but he lasted only one tournament, falling back to the unsalaried ranks. It took over four years, until January 1983, for him to win promotion back to jūryō and again he had a losing record and was demoted after only one tournament. After regular and intense training sessions with top division wrestler Kaiki of the Tomozuna stable he won promotion for the third time in March 1984, and finally established himself in jūryō. However he did not reach the top makuuchi division until September 1986, 81 tournaments after his professional debut – the second slowest ever at the time. He spent only two tournaments in the top division, peaking at maegashira 13. He was small compared to his contemporaries, at just 1.76 m (5 ft 9 in) tall and weighing around 116 kg (256 lb; 18.3 st).

Retirement from sumo[edit]

He retired from being an active wrestler in January 1989 and became an elder of the Japan Sumo Association under the name Nakagawa. However, following the sudden death in June of the same year of the head of the Miyagino stable (the former Hirokawa) he became the Miyagino stablemaster. The first sekitori he produced was Wakahayato in 1994, and Kōbō followed in 1999. In December 2000 he recruited later yokozuna Hakuhō,[2] after making a promise to then maegashira Kyokushūzan of the affiliated Ōshima stable, who had invited his fellow Mongolian to Japan for trials.[3] No other stable would take Hakuhō, as he weighed just 62 kg (137 lb; 9.8 st). at the time.[4] However after making his debut in March 2001 at the age of 16, Hakuhō trained hard and gained weight and muscle, and reached jūryō in January 2004.[3]

He was forced to give up the Miyagino name and head coach position in August 2004 when it was acquired by the former Kanechika (he had apparently only been renting it from the widow of the previous coach), but he remained in the stable under the name Kumagatani, and was still regarded as Hakuhō's mentor. In December 2010 he regained the Miyagino name and status of head coach after Kanechika was demoted by the Japan Sumo Association for being caught on tape discussing alleged match-fixing.[5] Miyagino has also coached Ryūō, Yamaguchi and Ishiura to the top division.

Fighting style[edit]

Chikubayama was a tsuki-oshi specialist who preferred pushing and thrusting techniques and did not like to fight on the mawashi or belt. He won most of his bouts by a straightforward oshi-dashi or push out.

Career record[edit]

Chikubayama Masakuni[6]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
1973 x (Maezumo) West Jonokuchi #6
5–2
 
West Jonidan #54
5–2
 
West Jonidan #9
3–4
 
West Jonidan #25
3–4
 
1974 East Jonidan #36
6–1
 
East Sandanme #76
5–2
 
East Sandanme #49
3–4
 
West Sandanme #58
3–4
 
East Sandanme #69
5–2
 
West Sandanme #36
3–4
 
1975 East Sandanme #46
3–4
 
East Sandanme #55
1–6
 
East Jonidan #5
4–3
 
East Sandanme #68
3–4
 
West Jonidan #1
4–3
 
West Sandanme #62
3–4
 
1976 West Jonidan #1
4–3
 
West Sandanme #64
4–3
 
West Sandanme #47
6–1
 
West Sandanme #7
2–5
 
East Sandanme #31
4–3
 
West Sandanme #18
6–1
 
1977 Makushita #41
2–5
 
West Sandanme #3
4–3
 
East Makushita #52
4–3
 
East Makushita #40
3–4
 
East Makushita #47
5–2
 
West Makushita #30
4–3
 
1978 West Makushita #25
3–4
 
East Makushita #32
4–3
 
West Makushita #24
5–2
 
West Makushita #12
6–1
 
West Makushita #2
4–3
 
East Jūryō #13
6–9
 
1979 East Makushita #4
3–4
 
East Makushita #10
4–3
 
East Makushita #6
3–4
 
East Makushita #12
1–6
 
East Makushita #38
5–2
 
East Makushita #23
5–2
 
1980 East Makushita #12
4–3
 
West Makushita #9
2–5
 
West Makushita #24
4–3
 
West Makushita #16
3–4
 
West Makushita #25
3–4
 
West Makushita #37
6–1
 
1981 West Makushita #14
4–3
 
West Makushita #10
3–4
 
West Makushita #17
4–3
 
West Makushita #9
4–3
 
West Makushita #7
3–4
 
West Makushita #11
5–2
 
1982 West Makushita #4
2–5
 
West Makushita #17
3–4
 
East Makushita #28
6–1–P
 
West Makushita #8
4–3
 
East Makushita #6
4–3
 
East Makushita #4
4–3
 
1983 West Jūryō #13
7–8
 
West Makushita #3
1–6
 
West Makushita #26
2–5
 
West Makushita #41
5–2
 
West Makushita #23
5–2
 
West Makushita #10
5–2
 
1984 West Makushita #2
4–3
 
East Jūryō #13
8–7
 
West Jūryō #9
9–6
 
East Jūryō #4
8–7
 
East Jūryō #2
7–8
 
East Jūryō #4
5–10
 
1985 East Jūryō #9
4–5–6
 
East Makushita #2
Sat out due to injury
0–0–7
East Makushita #2
5–2
 
West Jūryō #10
8–7
 
West Jūryō #9
8–7
 
East Jūryō #8
9–6
 
1986 East Jūryō #3
4–4–7
 
East Jūryō #12
9–6
 
West Jūryō #8
11–4
Champion

 
East Jūryō #1
8–7
 
East Maegashira #13
6–9
 
West Jūryō #4
10–5–P
 
1987 East Maegashira #14
5–10
 
West Jūryō #4
8–7
 
East Jūryō #4
8–7
 
East Jūryō #2
7–8
 
West Jūryō #4
7–8
 
West Jūryō #5
6–9
 
1988 West Jūryō #10
7–8
 
East Jūryō #12
6–9
 
West Makushita #2
4–3
 
East Makushita #1
3–4
 
East Makushita #6
2–5
 
East Makushita #22
5–2
 
1989 East Makushita #10
Retired
2–4–1
x x x x x
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 竹葉山 真邦 (in Japanese). Retrieved 2008-07-14. 
  2. ^ "Hakuho wrestles his way into the history books". The Japan Times. 2007-05-29. Retrieved 2008-07-09. 
  3. ^ a b Perran, Thierry (May 2006). "Hakuho: The white phoenix flies towards the summit". Le Monde Du Sumo. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 
  4. ^ "GRAND MILESTONE / Hakuho becomes fastest wrestler to join 1,000-win club". Yomiuri Shimbun. November 23, 2016. Retrieved 13 December 2016. 
  5. ^ "Stablemaster bout-rigging claim hit". Japan Times. 25 December 2010. Retrieved 31 December 2010. 
  6. ^ "Chikubayama Masakuni Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2012-09-06.