Hu Chin-lung

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This is a Chinese name; the family name is Hu.
Chin-Lung Hu
DSC04450 Chin-Lung Hu.jpg
Hu with the Los Angeles Dodgers
EDA Rhinos – No. 15
Born: (1984-02-02) February 2, 1984 (age 31)
Tainan City, Taiwan
Bats: Right Throws: Right
MLB debut
September 1, 2007, for the Los Angeles Dodgers
MLB statistics
(through 2011 season)
Batting average .176
Home runs 2
Runs batted in 18

Hu Chin-Lung (Chinese: 胡金龍; pinyin: Hú Jīnlóng; Pe̍h-ōe-jī: Hô͘ Kim-liông; born February 2, 1984) is a Taiwanese professional baseball player, currently with the EDA Rhinos of the Chinese Professional Baseball League. He is the fifth player — and first infielder — from Taiwan to play Major League Baseball. His last name (along with that of fellow countryman Fu-Te Ni, formerly of the Detroit Tigers) is the shortest in MLB history.

Professional career[edit]

Los Angeles Dodgers[edit]

Hu was signed by the Dodgers on January 31, 2003, and began his professional career with the rookie league Ogden Raptors in 2003. He split 2004 between the Columbus Catfish in A ball and the Vero Beach Dodgers in High-A ball. In 2005, he played the whole season at Vero Beach and hit .313 with 23 stolen bases.

In 2006, he played for the Double-A Jacksonville Suns. Hu played in the All-Star Futures Game during the All-Star break in both 2006 and 2007. He won the MVP award for his performance in the 2007 game.[1]

He was promoted to Triple-A Las Vegas on July 12, 2007, and made his major league debut on September 1, 2007, against the San Diego Padres. In his second MLB at bat, Hu hit a solo home run on September 11, 2007, against the Padres, becoming the first position player born in Taiwan to hit a home run in MLB. (Hu's teammate, pitcher Hong-Chih Kuo, had become the first Taiwanese-born player to hit a home run in MLB earlier in 2007). On September 25, Hu hit a two-run homer and became the first Taiwanese-born player to hit two home runs. Hu spent most of 2009 in AAA with the Albuquerque Isotopes and appeared in only five games with the Dodgers after a September callup.

In 2010 he again spent most of the year with the Isotopes. He appeared in 14 games with the Dodgers in 2010 and got 3 hits in 23 at-bats.

New York Mets[edit]

Hu with the New York Mets.

On December 27, 2010, he was traded to the New York Mets in exchange for pitcher Michael Antonini.[2] On May 17, he was outrighted to the minor leagues.

Cleveland Indians[edit]

After playing for the Adelaide Bite of the Australian Baseball League and starting shortstop for the World All-Stars at the 2011 Australian Baseball League All-Star Game, Hu signed a minor league contract with the Cleveland Indians in January, 2012.[3] He was released on March 28, 2012 and signed to a minor league deal with the Philadelphia Phillies, however his contract was voided the next day after he failed a physical. He then signed with the Southern Maryland Blue Crabs for the 2012 season.[4]

EDA Rhinos[edit]

In 2013, he signed with EDA Rhinos of the Chinese Professional Baseball League.

International career[edit]

Hu Chin-lung
Medal record
Competitor for  Chinese Taipei
Men’s Baseball
Asian Games
Gold medal – first place 2006 Doha Team
Silver medal – second place 2010 Guangzhou Team
Asian Baseball Championship
Bronze medal – third place 2007 Taichung Team
Silver medal – second place 2009 Sapporo Team

Hu played for Chinese Taipei in the 2006 World Baseball Classic.


  1. ^ Singer, Tom (June 8, 2007). "Dodgers prospect named Futures MVP". Archived from the original on July 12, 2007. 
  2. ^ "Dodgers part ways with Chin-Lung Hu". December 27, 2010. Archived from the original on December 30, 2010. Retrieved June 21, 2014. 
  3. ^ Paul Hoynes (January 13, 2012). "Cleveland Indians GM Chris Antonetti works on making that first decision". Archived from the original on January 31, 2012. Retrieved January 30, 2012. 
  4. ^ "MLB's Hu Chin-lung to join minor league team". The China Post. China News Analysis. April 4, 2012. Archived from the original on April 21, 2014. Retrieved April 4, 2012. 

External links[edit]