Central Huijin Investment

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Central Huijin Investment Co., Ltd.
State-owned enterprise
Industry Investment company
Founded Beijing, China (2003 (2003))
Headquarters Beijing, China
Area served
People's Republic of China
Key people
Ding Xuedong
(Chairman & CEO)
Number of employees
15 - 19[citation needed]
Parent China Investment Corporation
Website www.huijin-inv.cn
Central Huijin Investment Co., Ltd.
Simplified Chinese 中央汇金投资有限责任公司
Traditional Chinese 中央匯金投資有限責任公司
Literal meaning Central Foreign Exchange Investment Company Limited
Central Huijin
Simplified Chinese 中央汇金
Traditional Chinese 中央匯金

Central Huijin Investment Co., Ltd. is a Chinese investment company owned by the government of the People's Republic of China. Established in 2003, it became a wholly owned subsidiary of China Investment Corporation, with its own Board of Directors and Board of Supervisors.[1] Central Huijin's principal shareholder rights are exercised on behalf of the State Council.[2] Central Huijin is an organization by which the Chinese government can act as a shareholder for the "big four" state owned banks, thereby improving corporate governance and initiating reforms of the banking industry.[3]

History[edit]

Central Huijin Investment was acquired from the State Administration of Foreign Exchange by the China Investment Corporation for roughly $67 billion.[4]

Governance[edit]

Board of Directors[edit]

Subsidiaries[edit]

As of 31 December 2015

Investments[edit]

Currently, Central Huijin holds shares in several financial institutions: China Development Bank, Industrial and Commercial Bank of China, Bank of China, China Construction Bank, China Everbright Bank, China Reinsurance (Group) Corporation, China Jianyin Investment Limited, China Galaxy Securities Co., Shenwan Hongyuan Group, and Guotai Junan Securities Co.

It owns majority stakes in all big four Chinese banks (Bank of China, Industrial and Commercial Bank of China, China Construction Bank, and Agricultural Bank of China), but does not own shares in the smaller joint-stock commercial banks which are largely owned by local governments.


As of 31 December 2015

References[edit]

  1. ^ Gao Jie (2013): China’s Bank Reform and the Roles of Sovereign Wealth Fund, in Hummel, Detlev (Ed.): The Euro Financial Crisis. Impacts on Banking, Capital Markets, and Regulation. Report of the International Workshop in Potsdam on July 20/21, 2012. Universitätsverlag Potsdam, p.77-9.
  2. ^ Gao Jie (2013), p. 79.
  3. ^ Inside CCB Archived 2007-09-29 at the Wayback Machine.
  4. ^ Jamil Anderlini, China investment arm emerges from shadows, Financial Times, 5 January 2008.
  5. ^ "中国光大集团股份公司2016年度第一期中期票据发行文件" [China Everbright Group 2016 lot 1 medium term bond issue document]. China Everbright Group. archive of Shanghai Clearing House. 30 August 2016. Retrieved 18 October 2016. 
  6. ^ "2016 Interim Report" (PDF). Everbright Securities. archive of Hong Kong Stock Exchange. 26 September 2016. Retrieved 17 October 2016. 
  7. ^ "2015 Annual Report" (PDF). China Everbright Bank. archive of Hong Kong Stock Exchange. 29 April 2016. Retrieved 17 October 2016. 
  8. ^ "2015 Annual Report" (PDF). China Pacific Insurance. Hong Kong Stock Exchange. 27 April 2016. Retrieved 20 October 2016. 
  9. ^ "2015 Annual Report" (PDF). New China Life Insurance. Hong Kong Stock Exchange. 21 April 2016. Retrieved 7 January 2017. 
  10. ^ "2015 Annual Report" (PDF). Ping An Insurance. Hong Kong Stock Exchange. 29 March 2016. Retrieved 20 October 2016. 
  11. ^ "Pospectus" (PDF). CSC Financial. Hong Kong Stock Exchange. 29 November 2016. Retrieved 29 November 2016.