China Electronics Technology Group

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China Electronics Technology Group Corporation
TypeState-owned enterprise
IndustryDefence, Electronics, Telecommunications, IT
FoundedMarch 1, 2002; 18 years ago (2002-03-01)
Headquarters,
Area served
Worldwide
Key people
Xiong Qunli (Chairman and President)[1]
ProductsRadars, Unmanned aerial vehicles, Electronic equipment, Telecommunications equipments, Software, Internetworking
Revenue220,427,000,000 renminbi (2018) Edit this on Wikidata
Increase CN¥ 188 billion[2] (2016)
Increase CN¥ 18.31 billion[2] (2016)
Total assets$51.672 million [3]
OwnerChinese Central Government (via State Council) (100%)
Number of employees
179,636[4]
ParentState-owned Assets Supervision and Administration Commission
SubsidiariesCET HIK Group (100%)
Websitewww.cetc.com.cn
China Electronics Technology Group Corporation
Simplified Chinese中国电子科技集团公司
Traditional Chinese中國電子科技集團公司
CETC
Simplified Chinese中国电科
Traditional Chinese中國電科
Literal meaningChina Electronics Technology

China Electronics Technology Group Corporation (CETC) (zhongguo dianzi keji jituan gongsi),[5] established in 2002, is a Chinese state-owned company. Its fields include communications equipment, computers, electronic equipment, software development, research services, investment and asset management for civilian and military applications.[6][7] It was founded with the stated goal of leveraging civilian electronics for the benefit of the People's Liberation Army.[5]

History[edit]

China Electronics Technology Group Corporation was founded in March 2002 by the Minister of Information Industry.[8] The company is located in Beijing, Shanghai, Tianjin, Guangdong, Sichuan, Shaanxi and 18 other provinces.[citation needed] CETC has been the intended recipient of several prosecuted acts of industrial espionage in the U.S.[8]

In 2012, CETC celebrated their tenth anniversary and had 80,000 employees at the time.[5]

In March 2016, the government tasked the company with developing software to identify potential terrorists; using data on jobs, hobbies, consumption habits, and other behaviors.[9]

In June 2017, CETC successfully launched the world's largest fixed-wing drone swarm to date. The drones in the swarm were a commercial fixed-wing model produced by Skywalker Technology, a Wuhan-based company.[10]

In December 2017, CETC was reported to be soliciting government contracts to deploy facial recognition systems in Hotan Prefecture.[11]

In August 2020, the Bureau of Industry and Security placed four CETC subsidiaries on its Entity List for their work to militarize artificial islands in the South China Sea.[12][13][14] In September 2020, a CETC subsidiary named Zhenhua Data was implicated in a leak of intelligence gathering information on individuals worldwide.[15][16]

In November 2020, Donald Trump issued an executive order prohibiting any American company or individual from owning shares in companies that the United States Department of Defense has listed as having links to the People's Liberation Army, which included CETC.[17][18]

Subsidiaries[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Group Leader - CETC". China Electronics Technology Group Corporation. Archived from the original on 2016-09-15. Retrieved 2016-09-10.
  2. ^ a b 中国电科描绘2017年发展新蓝图 Archived 2017-03-15 at the Wayback Machine Archived 2017-03-15 at the Wayback Machine China Electronics Technology Group 2017-02-24 (in Chinese)
  3. ^ "China Electronics Technology Group". Fortune. Archived from the original on 2020-02-18. Retrieved 2020-06-02.
  4. ^ "Introduction - CETC". China Electronics Technology Group Corporation. Archived from the original on 2016-09-15. Retrieved 2016-09-10.
  5. ^ a b c Luce, Matthew (February 21, 2012). "A Model Company: CETC Celebrates 10 Years of Civil-Military Integration". Jamestown Foundation. Archived from the original on October 13, 2019.
  6. ^ "Company Overview of China Electronics Technology Group Corporation". Bloomberg. Archived from the original on 6 March 2016. Retrieved 5 March 2016.
  7. ^ Allen-Ebrahimian, Bethany (June 24, 2020). "Defense Department produces list of Chinese military-linked companies". Axios. Archived from the original on June 25, 2020. Retrieved June 24, 2020.
  8. ^ a b Godsey, Matthew; Lincy, Valerie (2019). "Gradual Signs of Change: Proliferation to and from China over Four Decades" (PDF). Strategic Trade Review. 5. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2020-10-11. Retrieved 2020-10-11.
  9. ^ "China Tries Its Hand at Pre-Crime". Bloomberg. Archived from the original on 5 March 2016. Retrieved 5 March 2016.
  10. ^ Laskai, Lorand (29 January 2018). "Civil-Military Fusion: The Missing Link Between China's Technological and Military Rise". Council on Foreign Relations. Archived from the original on 18 July 2020. Retrieved 22 July 2020.
  11. ^ Shih, Gerry (December 18, 2017). "AP Exclusive: Digital police state shackles Chinese minority". The Associated Press. Archived from the original on December 19, 2017. Retrieved December 19, 2017. The facial scanner is made by China Electronics Technology Group (CETC), a state-owned defense contractor that has spearheaded China’s fast-growing field of predictive policing with Xinjiang as its test bed. The AP found 27 CETC bids for Xinjiang government contracts, including one soliciting a facial recognition system for facilities and centers in Hotan Prefecture.
  12. ^ Long, Drake (August 26, 2020). "US Sanctions Chinese Companies Over South China Sea Island-Building". Radio Free Asia. Archived from the original on August 28, 2020. Retrieved August 26, 2020.
  13. ^ O’Keeffe, Kate (2020-08-26). "U.S. Sanctions Chinese Firms and Executives Active in Contested South China Sea". Wall Street Journal. ISSN 0099-9660. Archived from the original on 2020-08-26. Retrieved 2020-08-26.
  14. ^ "Commerce Department Adds 24 Chinese Companies to the Entity List for Helping Build Military Islands in the South China Sea". U.S. Department of Commerce. 2020-08-26. Archived from the original on 2020-08-26. Retrieved 2020-08-26.
  15. ^ Probyn, Andrew; Doran, Matthew (September 14, 2020). "China's 'hybrid war': Beijing's mass surveillance of Australia and the world for secrets and scandal". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. Archived from the original on September 15, 2020. Retrieved September 15, 2020.
  16. ^ "NZ academic's info in huge leak of data from firm linked to Chinese intelligence". Radio New Zealand. September 15, 2020. Archived from the original on September 25, 2020. Retrieved September 26, 2020.
  17. ^ Pamuk, Humeyra , Alexandra Alper, Idrees; Alper, Alexandra; Ali, Idrees (2020-11-13). "Trump bans U.S. investments in companies linked to Chinese military". Reuters. Archived from the original on 2020-12-11. Retrieved 2020-12-15.
  18. ^ "DOD Releases List of Additional Companies, in Accordance with Section 1237 of FY99 NDAA" (PDF). U.S. Department of Defense. August 28, 2020. Retrieved 2020-12-18.

External links[edit]