China Precision Machinery Import-Export Corporation

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Not to be confused with China National Machinery Import and Export Corporation (CMC), a Chinese state-owned international engineering contractor.
China Precision Machinery Import-Export Corporation
Native name
中国精密机械进出口总公司
State-owned
Industry Defense
Founded 1980
Headquarters Beijing, China
Products Air defense systems

China Precision Machinery Import-Export Corporation (CPMIEC, Chinese: 中国精密机械进出口总公司) is a Chinese defense company that acts as one of a number of authorized defense trading companies.[1] It represents the domestic defense manufacturing industry in the export of arms and technology in missile and air defense systems.[1]

Turkish air defense system[edit]

In a notable announcement in September 2013, Turkey, a member of the NATO alliance, declared its intention to acquire the HQ-9 missile defense system from the company, in a deal valued at 3.44 billion US dollar.[2] CPMIEC was selected against three other competitors. The Aster 30 missile with SAMP/T launcher from the Italo-French consortium Eurosam came second with a price tag of US$4.4 billion, the Patriot missile defense system offered by Lockheed Martin and Raytheon came third at a cost of US$5 billion and the S-300 system from the Russian Rosoboronexport fourth in the competition.[2][3]

Following high level pressure by other NATO members, Turkey relented and announced giving up on the deal in November 2015. Earlier in February 20, 2015, the Turkish defense minister Ismet Yilmaz had confirmed the purchase.[4][5][6]

Venezuelan radar[edit]

In China's first major arms sale in Latin America, Venezuela in 2005 purchased JYL-1 radars from the company in a deal worth US$150 million. After this successful deal, the Venezuelan military explored buying other radars from CPMIEC and would go on to purchase aircraft from CATIC, another Chinese defense firm.[7]

Syrian missile development[edit]

The company has worked with Syrian Scientific Studies and Research Center and shipped missile components to the research institute, according to a US media report in 1996 citing the CIA.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b The Chinese Army Today: Tradition and Transformation for the 21st Century. Routledge. 2012. p. 54. 
  2. ^ a b "NATO Chief: Turkey Hasn't Completed Chinese Missile-Defense Deal". Wall Street Journal. September 30, 2013. Retrieved September 16, 2013.  (subscription required)
  3. ^ "Turkish retired general urges purchase of Chinese missiles". China Daily. February 22, 2015. 
  4. ^ http://rt.com/news/233803-turkey-china-antimissile-defense/
  5. ^ http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/2015/02/turkey-to-spend-3-4b-on-air-defenses-that-wont-work-with-nato-network/
  6. ^ "Turkey in Talks with Eurosam for Air Defense Deal". Defense News. September 8, 2014. Retrieved November 26, 2014. 
  7. ^ Decline of the U.S. Hegemony?: A Challenge of ALBA and a New Latin American Integration of the Twenty-First Century. Lanham, Maryland: Lexington Books. 2015. p. 356. 
  8. ^ Gertz, Bill (23 July 1996). "CIA Suspects Chinese Firm of Syria Missile Aid". The Washington Times. Retrieved 22 August 2015 – via HighBeam Research. (subscription required (help)).