Chinese Imperial Dog

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Chinese Imperial Dog.jpg
A Chinese Imperial Dog
Other namesImperial Shih-Tzu
OriginChina
Domestic dog (Canis lupus familiaris)

The Chinese Imperial Dog is a Toy dog breed with a wrinkly, short-muzzled face, and curled tail. Kennel clubs originally classified the breed under the shih-tzu, before recognizing the Imperial as a separate breed. Other names for the Chinese Imperial Dog include: Imperial Shih Tzu, Lion Dog, Micro Shih Tzu, Miniature Shih Tzu, Princess-type Shih Tzu, Tiny Teacup Shih Tzu, Tiny Toy Shih Tzu.[1] The purpose of the Chinese Imperial Dog is considered a [1].

History[edit]

The Chinese Imperial Dog was first bred in China in the Imperial Palace where the smaller ones were carried by the nobility in the sleeves of their robes. This breed of dog was gifted to foreign dignities as gifts in Imperial China After coming to the United States there were always breeders that bred the smaller dogs but the Chinese Imperial Dog did not receive recognition until March 2005. In the 1980s and 1990s the breed got the nicknames "teacup", "mini", and "tiny toy"

Origin Debate[edit]

There is not agreement among experts as to origin date of the Chinese Imperial Dog. The Chinese Imperial Dog Club of America claims that the Chinese Imperial Dog has been in existence for over 2000 while The American Kennel Club claims it has only been in existence since the 1960s. [2] The reason behind the origin debate is that the Chinese Imperial Dog is almost identical to the Shih Tzu in every aspect except for their size. [3]

Traits[edit]

Country of Origin: China
Date of Origin: 700 A.D. - 1960 A.D.
Original Function: Companion / Status Symbol
Today’s Function: Companion
Height: 9 inches or less [4]
Weight: Less than 9 pounds [5]
Coat: They have a very long coat which is fairly dense and with wavy texture. [2] Although most commonly trimmed to a puppy cut, owners today often keep the fur long, although this requires much more brushing. The Chinese Imperial's coat colors can come in virtually any color ranging from black to cream to white, and can be solid, tri-colored or bi-colored, with bi-colored black and white being the most common.
Exercise requirements: This dog on average has 45 minutes of activity per day. [2] Because of their size, most owners often leave exercise out of their lives.
Care: coat should be kept according to the standard: occasional bathing, ear care and regular clipping.
Eye Color: Brown or Amber [2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Dog Breed Info Center. "Chinese Imperial Dog - Information and Pictures". Dog Breed Info Center. Retrieved 23 February 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d "Chinese Imperial Dog". Wag Walking. Wag Walking. Retrieved 22 November 2018.
  3. ^ "The Chinese Imperial Dog: Myth or New Rare Breed?". Small Dog Place. Small Dog Place. Retrieved 22 November 2018.
  4. ^ Dog Breed Info Center. "Chinese Imperial Dog - Information and Pictures". Dog Breed Info Center. Retrieved 23 February 2017.
  5. ^ Dog Breed Info Center. "Chinese Imperial Dog - Information and Pictures". Dog Breed Info Center. Retrieved 23 February 2017.