Cynoglossum amabile

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Cynoglossum amabile
Starr 070320-5753 Cynoglossum amabile.jpg
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Plantae
Clade: Angiosperms
Clade: Eudicots
Clade: Asterids
Order: Boraginales
Family: Boraginaceae
Genus: Cynoglossum
Species:
C. amabile
Binomial name
Cynoglossum amabile

Cynoglossum amabile is a species of flowering plant native to Asia,[1] which is also called Chinese hound's tongue,[2] or Chinese forget-me-not. A hardy annual growing to 50 cm (20 in), it has hairy leaves and cymes of sky-blue flowers in late summer. This plant, closely related to the common forget-me-not of temperate gardens (Myosotis sylvatica), it is also used as an ornamental plant.[3] In cultivation in the UK it has gained the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit.[4] (confirmed 2017).[5]

The Latin specific epithet amabile means “lovely”.[6]

Toxicity[edit]

Cynoglossum amabile contains tumorigenic pyrrolizidine alkaloids[7] such as amabiline.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Cynoglossum amabile". Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Agricultural Research Service (ARS), United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). Retrieved 16 January 2018.
  2. ^ Cynoglossum amabile at USDA PLANTS Database
  3. ^ "Cynoglossum amabile at NC State University". Archived from the original on 2007-02-03. Retrieved 2007-04-11.
  4. ^ "Cynoglossum amabile - Chinese forget-me-not". Royal Horticultural Society. Retrieved 15 August 2018.
  5. ^ "AGM Plants - Ornamental" (PDF). Royal Horticultural Society. July 2017. p. 26. Retrieved 24 January 2018.
  6. ^ Harrison, Lorraine (2012). RHS Latin for Gardeners. United Kingdom: Mitchell Beazley. ISBN 978-1845337315.
  7. ^ Fu, Peter P.; Yang, Ya-Chen; Xia, Qingsu; Chou, M.W.; Cui, Y.Y.; Lin, G. (2002). "Pyrrolizidine alkaloids - tumorigenic components in Chinese herbal medicines and dietary supplements". Journal of Food and Drug Analysis. 10 (4): 198–211. Retrieved 2018-08-15.
  8. ^ Culvenor, CCJ; Smith, LW (1967). "The alkaloids of Cynoglossum australe R.Br. And C. Amabile Stapf & Drummond". Australian Journal of Chemistry. 20 (11): 2499. doi:10.1071/CH9672499.