Chinle, Arizona

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Chinle, Arizona
Chinlea&w.jpg
Location in Apache County and the state of Arizona
Location in Apache County and the state of Arizona
Chinle is located in Arizona
Chinle
Chinle
Location in Arizona
Chinle is located in the United States
Chinle
Chinle
Location in the United States
Coordinates: 36°9′17″N 109°34′45″W / 36.15472°N 109.57917°W / 36.15472; -109.57917Coordinates: 36°9′17″N 109°34′45″W / 36.15472°N 109.57917°W / 36.15472; -109.57917
Country United States
State Arizona
CountyApache
Area
 • Total16.32 sq mi (42.26 km2)
 • Land16.29 sq mi (42.19 km2)
 • Water0.03 sq mi (0.06 km2)
Elevation
5,506 ft (1,678 m)
Population
 (2020)
 • Total4,573
 • Density280.71/sq mi (108.38/km2)
Time zoneUTC-7 (MST)
 • Summer (DST)UTC-6 (MDT)
ZIP codes
86503
Area code928
FIPS code04-12770
GNIS feature ID2861

Chinle (Navajo: Chʼínílį́) is a census-designated place (CDP) in Apache County, Arizona, United States. The name in Navajo means "flowing out" and is a reference to the location where the water flows out of the Canyon de Chelly.[2] The population was 4,518 at the 2010 census.[3]

Geography[edit]

Chinle is located at 36°9′17″N 109°34′45″W / 36.15472°N 109.57917°W / 36.15472; -109.57917 (36.154718, -109.579040).[4]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the CDP has a total area of 16.1 square miles (41.6 km2), of which 16.0 square miles (41.5 km2) is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km2), or 0.16%, is water.[3]

Demographics[edit]

Languages (2000) [5] Percent
Spoke Navajo at home 71.9%
Spoke English at home 28.1%
Historical population
Census Pop.
20204,573
U.S. Decennial Census[6]

As of the census[7] of 2000, there were 5,366 people, 1,358 households, and 1,076 families residing in the CDP. The population density was 334.7 people per square mile (129.2/km2). There were 1,644 housing units at an average density of 102.6 per square mile (39.6/km2). The racial makeup of the CDP was 91.3% Native American, 6.4% White, 0.2% Black or African American, 0.2% Asian, <0.1% Pacific Islander, 0.6% from other races, and 1.3% from two or more races. 1.8% of the population were Hispanic or Latino of any race.

There were 1,358 households, out of which 52.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.6% were married couples living together, 30.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 20.7% were non-families. 18.3% of all households were made up of individuals, and 2.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 3.84 and the average family size was 4.43.

In the CDP, the age distribution of the population shows 43.9% under the age of 18, 10.5% from 18 to 24, 25.8% from 25 to 44, 14.7% from 45 to 64, and 5.1% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 22 years. For every 100 females, there were 93.6 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 81.9 males.

The median income for a household in the CDP was $27,324, and the median income for a family was $26,182. Males had a median income of $25,321 versus $22,663 for females. The per capita income for the CDP was $8,755. About 40.4% of families and 43.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 52.6% of those under age 18 and 46.9% of those age 65 or over.

History[edit]

In the Spanish colonial period, Chinle was a base for both trade and war. After acquisition of this area by the United States following the Mexican-American War, relations between the peoples deteriorated in the 1860s.

In the United States conducted a peace conference through their representative Kit Carson and the Navajo people in order to end the war between the Navajo and the U.S. The first trading post operated out of a tent and was established here in 1882. By 1885 a full-sized camp had developed. [8]

The Chinle Boarding School was established in 1910 by the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA). Khalil Anthony Johnson Jr., a PhD candidate at Yale University, wrote an article in 2014 that said, with this school, the federal government "established a permanent presence in [Chinle]", and that the BIA "effectively governed the town thereafter."[9]

Initially anglicized as Chin Lee, the spelling of the name was changed to Chinle on April 1, 1941.[8]

Chinle serves as a gateway community for Canyon de Chelly National Monument. The monument was established in 1931 primarily to preserve the archaeological sites and record of ancient human history. Canyon de Chelly is unique among the National Park Service units because the park is located entirely on Navajo tribal land and it has a residential community in the canyon.

In the 1950s Chinle had a population with a variety of ethnicities, who tended to settle in separate areas. In addition to Navajo and non-Navajo Native Americans, there were Anglo white and Black people, and some of other races. The total population was under 200. Employees of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), one of the major employers, and school employees lived in their own compounds. The Chinle Boarding School and a public health clinic were the other two major employers.[10]

By the 1950s the community had an issue with numerous stray dogs, who were not neutered nor spayed. Chinle had no leash law.[11] On April 8, 1956, BIA authorities rounded up and shot stray dogs without warning, leaving some remains at people's doorsteps. The community protested when another dog shooting was ordered on September 23, 1956.[12] G. Warren Spaulding, The General Superintendent of the Navajo Agency, ordered the dog shoot anyway, and did not notify the residents of his reason for rejecting their protest.[13] Community outcry led to the installation of a gas chamber to euthanize unclaimed dogs.[14]

In 2019, the television series Basketball or Nothing, featuring Chinle High School's basketball team, premiered on Netflix.

Education[edit]

Primary and secondary schools[edit]

The area is served by Chinle Unified School District.[15]

Schools in the area and served by the district include Tsaile Elementary School (K-8), Many Farms Elementary School (K-6), Canyon de Chelly Elementary School (K-6), Chinle Elementary School (K-6), Mesa View Elementary School (K-6), Chinle Junior High School (7-8), and Chinle High School (9-12).[16]

The Bureau of Indian Education (BIE) operates the Cottonwood Day School in an area with a Chinle postal address, 11 miles (18 km) west of U.S. Highway 191 on Navajo Route 4.[17]

The Chinle Boarding School, a Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) school, was formerly in Chinle until 1976, when it moved to Many Farms, though initially it had the same name post-move.[18] The name later changed to Many Farms Community School (MFCS).[19]

Tertiary education[edit]

A branch of the Diné College is located here as well as a branch of Northern Arizona University and Navajo Technical University.

Health[edit]

The Navajo AIDS Network is based in Chinle. Chinle Comprehensive Healthcare Center Chinle IHS is a full service Healthcare facility operated by the US Indian Health Service. It includes a hospital, emergency services, outpatient clinic, pharmacy, dental clinic and other health-related services. These services are reserved for Native Americans except in emergencies. The pharmacy is not open to the general public.

Amenities[edit]

Restaurants[edit]

The Junction Restaurant in Chinle

Chinle is the home of several sit-down and fast food restaurants, most of which are located on the US 191 and Indian Route 7 that run through town. In terms of fast food, Chinle has a Burger King, Subway, Church's Chicken, and Pizza Edge. Serving American and some traditional Navajo foods, there are the Junction Restaurant at the Best Western; Garcia's Restaurant at the Holiday Inn; and Thunderbird Lodge Cafeteria at the Thunderbird Lodge. The King Dragon Restaurant serves Chinese cuisine.

Groceries and other services[edit]

Several gas stations and convenience stores are in town including Shell, Chevron, and Conoco with Pic-n-run next door. At the center of town is Tseyi Shopping Center with a Bashas' Diné grocery store, Ace Hardware, U.S. Post Office, Wells Fargo Bank, and Chinle laundromat. Other services available are Jumbo Automotive, Uhaul, Ferrell Gas, BV Tires, CellularOne, Silvercoin laundromat, carwash, and video rental.

Native craft and souvenir items can be found at the motel gift shops or at the Navajo Arts and Crafts outlet at the junction of 191 and Route 7. A Visitor Center and bookstore are located at Canyon de Chelly National Monument.

Local facilities[edit]

Chinle has a large community center dedicated to serving the local community. Next to it is the Wildcat Den, a large sports complex where high school basketball games are played. The swimming pool complex at the high school also serves the community with open swim time and lap swimming for a small fee.

Churches[edit]

Many religious organizations are represented in Chinle. There are services available at the Baptist Church, Tselani Valley and Spider Rock Fellowship United Methodist Churches, Seventh-day Adventist Church, Mennonite Church, Trinity Presbyterian Church, Grace Fellowship Community Church, Canyon Family Church, Foursquare Gospel Church, Chinle Potters House, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, Jehovah's Witnesses Kingdom Hall, and Our Lady of Fatima Catholic Church.

Lodging and camping[edit]

Chinle's Best Western

There are three sleeping accommodations in town, including a Best Western, Holiday Inn and the Thunderbird Lodge. All three offer dining and a gift shop. Best Western offers an indoor pool and Holiday Inn offers an outdoor pool.

Camping is offered for a fee at the Cottonwood Campground managed by the Navajo Nation, which features 90 sites, restroom facilities, dumpstation and potable water. No RV parks with utilities are available in town.

Government[edit]

Several Federal, County and Navajo tribal agencies are located in town. The local government is located at the Chinle Chapter House. The Chapter House serves as a town hall with a Chapter President, Vice President and Secretary/Treasurer as elected officials.

Other departments include the Navajo Police Department, Navajo Housing Authority, Navajo Tribal Utility Authority, Navajo Parks and Recreation, Apache County Office, Indian Health Service, Bureau of Indian Affairs, and the National Park Service.

Nearby attractions[edit]

Notable people[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "2020 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved October 29, 2021.
  2. ^ "Chinle Chapter". Chinle Chapter of the Navajo Nation. Archived from the original on 3 November 2016. Retrieved 13 May 2012.
  3. ^ a b "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Chinle CDP, Arizona". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Archived from the original on February 12, 2020. Retrieved April 17, 2013.
  4. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23.
  5. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2017-05-25. Retrieved 2017-03-24.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  6. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Retrieved June 4, 2016.
  7. ^ "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  8. ^ a b Byrd H. Granger (1960). Arizona Place Names. University of Arizona Press. p. 8. Retrieved 20 November 2011.
  9. ^ Johnson, Khalil Anthony Jr. (February 2014). "The Chinle Dog Shoots: Federal Governance and Grass-roots Politics in Postwar Navajo Country". Pacific Historical Review. University of California Press. 83 (1): 92–129 [97]. doi:10.1525/phr.2014.83.1.92. JSTOR 10.1525/phr.2014.83.1.92.
  10. ^ Johnson, Khalil Anthony Jr. (February 2014). "The Chinle Dog Shoots: Federal Governance and Grass-roots Politics in Postwar Navajo Country". Pacific Historical Review. University of California Press. 83 (1): 92–129 [94]. doi:10.1525/phr.2014.83.1.92. JSTOR 10.1525/phr.2014.83.1.92.
  11. ^ Johnson, Khalil Anthony Jr. (February 2014). "The Chinle Dog Shoots: Federal Governance and Grass-roots Politics in Postwar Navajo Country". Pacific Historical Review. University of California Press. 83 (1): 92–129 [108]. doi:10.1525/phr.2014.83.1.92. JSTOR 10.1525/phr.2014.83.1.92.
  12. ^ Johnson, Khalil Anthony Jr. (February 2014). "The Chinle Dog Shoots: Federal Governance and Grass-roots Politics in Postwar Navajo Country". Pacific Historical Review. University of California Press. 83 (1): 92–129 [92–93]. doi:10.1525/phr.2014.83.1.92. JSTOR 10.1525/phr.2014.83.1.92.
  13. ^ Johnson, Khalil Anthony Jr. (February 2014). "The Chinle Dog Shoots: Federal Governance and Grass-roots Politics in Postwar Navajo Country". Pacific Historical Review. University of California Press. 83 (1): 92–129 [97]. doi:10.1525/phr.2014.83.1.92. JSTOR 10.1525/phr.2014.83.1.92.
  14. ^ Johnson, Khalil Anthony Jr. (February 2014). "The Chinle Dog Shoots: Federal Governance and Grass-roots Politics in Postwar Navajo Country". Pacific Historical Review. University of California Press. 83 (1): 92-129 [124]. doi:10.1525/phr.2014.83.1.92. JSTOR 10.1525/phr.2014.83.1.92.
  15. ^ "School District Reference Map (2010 Census): Apache County, AZ" (PDF). 2010 U.S. Census. U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 2020-04-08. – Chinle USD is depicted on pages 1 and 2.
  16. ^ "Public School Search". www.ade.az.gov. Retrieved 2017-06-02.
  17. ^ "National Directory June 2015" (Archive). Bureau of Indian Education. p. 16/44. Retrieved on June 16, 2015. Address: "Navajo Route #4, 11 miles west of Hwy 191, 26 miles, Cottonwood"
  18. ^ "Chinle School in New Home". The Gallup Independent. Gallup, New Mexico. 1976-07-30. p. 3.Clipping from Newspapers.com.
  19. ^ Silversmith, Shondioin (2012-12-13). "Historian hopes to find artists from Chinle Boarding School". Navajo Times. Retrieved 2021-07-15. [...]which has since been renamed to Many Farms Community School[...]
  20. ^ Aminu, Abdulkareem Baba (August 29, 2006). "Nigeria: Megalyn Echikunwoke – Mega-Talent Doing Nigeria Proud!". AllAfrica. Retrieved December 8, 2016.
  21. ^ Hagerty, Donald J. (1996). Canyon de Chelly: 100 Hundred Years of Painting and Photography. G. Smith. p. 99. ISBN 978-0879057053.
  22. ^ Thomas, Jr., Robert (1998-02-01). "Carl Gorman, Code Talker In World War II, Dies at 90". The New York Times (in American English). ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2021-09-15.
  23. ^ Means, Russell; Marvin J Wolf (1995). Where white men fear to tread: the autobiography of Russell Means. New York: St. Martin's Press. ISBN 978-0312136215.

External links[edit]

Media related to Chinle, Arizona at Wikimedia Commons