Chione (daughter of Boreas)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

In Greek mythology, Chione (from Greek χιών – chiōn, "snow")[1] was the daughter of Boreas, the god of the north wind, and Orithyia a daughter of Erechtheus, king of Athens.[2] Chione was the sister of Cleopatra (wife of Phineus, king of Thrace) and the Argonauts, Calaïs and Zetes. According to a late, though generally accepted tradition, Chione was the mother of Poseidon's son Eumolpus whom she threw into the ocean for fear of her father's reaction; however, Eumolpus is rescued and raised by Poseidon.[3]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Liddell and Scott, s.v. χιών.
  2. ^ Grimal, s.v. Chione; Smith, s.v. Chione 1.; Apollodorus, 3.15.2, 1.9.21; Pausanias, 1.38.2.
  3. ^ Grimal, s.v. Eumolpus; Smith, s.v. Eumolpus; Apollodorus, 3.15.4; Pausanias, 1.38.2. For other traditions regarding Eumolpus' parentage see Frazer's 3.15.4 n. 1.

References[edit]

  • Apollodorus, Apollodorus, The Library, with an English Translation by Sir James George Frazer, F.B.A., F.R.S. in 2 Volumes. Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1921. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.
  • Grimal, Pierre, The Dictionary of Classical Mythology, Wiley-Blackwell, 1996, ISBN 9780631201021.
  • Hyginus, Gaius Julius, Fabulae in Apollodorus' Library and Hyginus' Fabuae: Two Handbooks of Greek Mythology, Translated, with Introductions by R. Scott Smith and Stephen M. Trzaskoma, Hackett Publishing Company, 2007. ISBN 978-0-87220-821-6.
  • Liddell, Henry George, Robert Scott. A Greek-English Lexicon. Revised and augmented throughout by Sir Henry Stuart Jones with the assistance of. Roderick McKenzie. Oxford. Clarendon Press. 1940. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library
  • Pausanias, Pausanias Description of Greece with an English Translation by W.H.S. Jones, Litt.D., and H.A. Ormerod, M.A., in 4 Volumes. Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard University Press; London, William Heinemann Ltd. 1918. Online version at the Perseus Digital Library.