Todos los días sale el sol (song)

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"Todos los días sale el sol"
Todos-los-dias-sale-el-sol-single.jpg
Single by Bongo Botrako
from the album Todos los días sale el sol
Released18 June 2010 (2010-06-18)
RecordedApril–June 2010 at La Atlántida Studio in Barcelona, Spain
Genre
Length2:26
LabelKasba Music
Songwriter(s)Uri Giné
Producer(s)
  • Mario Patiño
  • Uri Giné
Bongo Botrako singles chronology
"Todos los días sale el sol"
(2010)
"Caminante"
(2012)
Music video
"Todos los días sale el sol" on YouTube

"Todos los días sale el sol", (English: "The sun rises every day"), also known as "Chipirón",[3] is a song by Spanish alternative rock band Bongo Botrako, written by lead vocalist Uri Giné and featuring uncredited vocals by Spanish band La Pegatina.[4] It was recorded by the band for their 2010 debut studio album Todos los días sale el sol and was released as the album's first single on 18 June 2010.[5]

The song became very popular in Spain after the men's national basketball team players, including Pau Gasol, Marc Gasol and Ricky Rubio, took the habit of singing it before every game in the EuroBasket 2011 Championship, which they eventually won.[4][6] In September 2011, "Todos los días sale el sol" peaked at No. 12 on the Spain Songs chart and No. 2 on the iTunes Spain Songs chart. The song accumulates more than 15 million streamings on YouTube[7] and more than 7 million streamings on Spotify, which ultimately makes it Bongo Botrako's most popular song by far.[8]

Inspiration[edit]

Original graffiti that inspired the song, in Granada, Spain.

Uri Giné wrote the song in Granada, Spain, where he lived for a few months. He was inspired by a graffiti on a wall that he saw while walking around the Albayzín district. The graffiti read the optimistic phrase "Todos los días sale el sol chipirón..!".[9] In Spanish, "chipirón" means "small squid", but in this context the word was used as a funny way to refer to a person. A few days later, Giné woke up in the middle of the night with this phrase in his head and wrote the whole song in thirty minutes. Even though the lyrics aren't completely explicit, Giné once admitted that the song is mainly about sexual experiences that he had while living in Granada.[10]

Music video[edit]

The music video for "Todos los días sale el sol" was directed by Egoi Suso.[11] It was shot in Tarragona, Spain on 20 May 2011[12] and was released on 23 June 2011. In the video, frontman Uri Giné is shown singing the song as he walks down the street and meets his bandmates. He also passes through two bars, a hair salon and a bar's kitchen, and he finally arrives to a small square where he sings along with the whole band and a crowd of fans.[11] Uri Giné wanted the music video to end in this square because he used to play his songs there very often before forming the band. Actually, another song from the same album, called "La plaça de la alegría", is about this square and some stories that took place there. The real name of the square is Plaça Sedassos and it is located in the old town of Tarragona, Spain.[13][14]

Personnel[edit]

Credits adapted from the liner notes of Todos los días sale el sol.[15]

Bongo Botrako

  • Uri Giné – vocals, production
  • Nacho Pascual – guitar
  • Xavi Vallverdú – keyboard
  • David Garcia – bass
  • Gorka Robert – drums, percussion
  • Xavi Barrero – trumpet
  • Oscar Gómez – sax

Additional musicians

  • Rubén Sierra – vocals
  • Adrià Salas – vocals

Production

Design

Charts[edit]

Chart (2011) Peak
position
Spain Top 50 (Promusicae)[16] 12
Spain iTunes Top 10[17] 2

References[edit]

  1. ^ "'Todos los días sale el sol chipirón' una canción con suerte". La Razón (in Spanish). 24 October 2011. Retrieved 18 January 2017.
  2. ^ "Concierto de Bongo Botrako en las Fiestas de la Paloma de Madrid". Kedin (in Spanish). 31 July 2015. Retrieved 18 January 2017.
  3. ^ "Bongo Botrako, los del 'chipirón'". Radio Euskadi (in Spanish). 11 May 2012. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  4. ^ a b Mena, Fran (23 September 2011). "¡Todos los días sale el sol, Felipón! Cómo se gestó la canción del Eurobasket". RTVE (in Spanish). Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  5. ^ "Portada single 'Todos los días sale el sol'". Flickr (in Spanish). 18 June 2010. Retrieved 18 January 2017.
  6. ^ "Eurobasket: Los doce campeones, uno a uno". Spanish Basketball Federation (in Spanish). 18 September 2011. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  7. ^ "Todos los días sale el sol (Videoclip oficial)". YouTube. 23 June 2011. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
    "Todos los días sale el sol". YouTube. 2 August 2010. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
    "Todos los días sale el sol". YouTube. 8 July 2012. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
    "Todos los días sale el sol". YouTube. 15 October 2010. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  8. ^ "Bongo Botrako". Spotify. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  9. ^ "Entrevista a El Matí de Catalunya Ràdio". SoundCloud (in Catalan). 7 December 2012. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  10. ^ "Entrevista a Uri Giné". Més Música (in Catalan). 16 January 2017. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  11. ^ a b "Todos los días sale el sol (Videoclip oficial)". YouTube. 23 June 2011. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  12. ^ "Making off videoclip "Todos los días sale el sol"". Bongo Botrako (in Spanish). 20 May 2011. Archived from the original on 18 January 2017. Retrieved 17 January 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  13. ^ "El ritmo de los Bongo Botrako tarraconenses, banda sonora de los campeones de Europa". El Mundo (in Spanish). 19 September 2011. Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  14. ^ Cosano, Raúl (5 June 2013). "Diez videoclips con D.O. Tarragona". Diari de Tarragona (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 18 January 2017. Retrieved 17 January 2017. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  15. ^ Bongo Botrako (2010). Todos los días sale el sol (CD booklet) |format= requires |url= (help). Kasba Music. DL B-29603-2010.
  16. ^ "Top 50 Canciones España – Semana 38, 2011". Promusicae (in Spanish). Retrieved 17 January 2017.
  17. ^ "Spanish Songs Top 10 – September 20, 2011". iTunes Charts. Retrieved 17 January 2017.

External links[edit]