Chippiparai

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Chippiparai
A male chippiparai.jpg
OriginIndia
Breed statusNot recognised as a breed by any major kennel club.
Traits
Height Male 63 cm (25 in) average
Female 56 cm (22 in) average
Coat Short
Colour Predominantly white
Dog (domestic dog)

The Chippiparai is a breed of sighthound from Tamil Nadu in southern India.

The Chippiparai has typical streamlined sighthound features with long legs and a lean and lithe frame built for speed, the breed is usually white in colour although other colours can be found, it averages 61 centimetres (24 in) in height at the withers, dogs averaging 63 centimetres (25 in) and bitches 56 centimetres (22 in).[1][2][3] A hardy breed, the Chippiparai is reputed to prefer a single master, shunning food and pats from anyone except its handler.[2][3][4] The Chippiparai is often regarded as the most intelligent and biddable of India's native dog breeds.[4]

The Chippiparai is most frequently found in the regions of Virudhunagar, Tirunelveli, Thenkasi, Thoothukudi, and Madurai, thought to be descended from Salukis the breed was historically kept by royalty in southern India, its name derived from a village name of Sippipparai in Vembakottai Taluk of Virudhunagar District.[1] The Chippiparai was traditionally used to hunt small game, predominantly hare, due to its intelligence and biddable nature the breed has successfully been trained as police dogs.[2][3][4][5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Karthickeyan, S.M.K.; Ravimurugan, T.; Hisham, A.; Sivaselvam, S.N. (2015). "Chippiparai breed of dogs in Tamil Nadu: An assessment of physical and performance characteristics". Indian Journal of Veterinary Sciences and Biotechnology. 10 (3): 45–49. ISSN 2394-0247. Retrieved 21 September 2020.
  2. ^ a b c Soman, W.V. (1962). The Indian Dog. Mumbai: Popular Prakashan. pp. 93–94.
  3. ^ a b c Morris, Desmond (2001). Dogs: the ultimate guide to over 1,000 dog breeds. North Pomfret, VT: Trafalgar Square Publishing. p. 46. ISBN 1-57076-219-8.
  4. ^ a b c Hancock, David (2012). Sighthounds: their form, their function and their future. Ramsbury, Marlborough: The Crowood Press Ltd. pp. 110–111. ISBN 978-1-84797-392-4.
  5. ^ Fogle, Bruce (2009). The encyclopedia of the dog. New York: DK Publishing. pp. 102–103. ISBN 978-0-7566-6004-8.