Chiyomaru Kazuki

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千代丸 一樹
Chiyomaru Kazuki
Chiyomaru 2014.jpg
Personal information
Born Kazuki Kinoshita
(1991-04-17) April 17, 1991 (age 26)
Shibushi, Kagoshima, Japan
Height 1.79 m (5 ft 10 12 in)
Weight 189 kg (417 lb)
Career
Stable Kokonoe
Current rank see below
Debut May, 2007
Highest rank Maegashira 11 (September, 2014)
Championships 1 (Jūryō)
* Up to date as of August 28, 2017.

Chiyomaru Kazuki (千代丸 一樹, born April, 17, 1991 as Kazuki Kinoshita) is a professional sumo wrestler from Shibushi, Kagoshima, Japan. He made his professional debut in May 2007. He took the second division jūryō championship in his third tournament in the division in January 2014 and was promoted to the top makuuchi division in the following tournament. His highest rank has been maegashira 11. He is the older brother of fellow professional sumo wrestler Chiyoōtori, and has served as his younger brother's attendant or tsukebito.

Early life and sumo background[edit]

The future Chiyomaru was born in what is now Shibushi city in Kagoshima prefecture. During his primary and middle school years he practiced judo rather than sumo. Upon graduating from a junior high school in Shibushi, he joined Kokonoe stable. His year and a half younger brother, Yūki, would follow him into this stable a year later.

Career[edit]

He first entered the professional sumo ring in July 2007. He slowly worked his way up the ranks, and after two years and two months in the ring his shikona (or ring name) was changed to Chiyomaru following the Kokonoe stable custom of giving wrestlers a ring name that starts with Chiyo upon promotion to the sandanme division. It would take him over four years rising slowly through the lower divisions before reaching the professional ranks of jūryō.[1] During this time, in 2011 he and his brother's family home was lost in a fire and they agreed building their parents a new house could be motivation for them to achieve more success in sumo.[2] Chiyomaru's coach, the former Chiyonofuji remarked that before his brother overtook him he lacked motivation and disliked training, and in many ways it was being passed up by his own brother that spurred him on to improve his sumo. To add insult to injury, when Chiyomaru's younger brother became a sekitori (a salaried wrestler) and in need of an attendant, his coach chose Chiyomaru in hopes of motivating him to try harder to make the professional ranks and divest himself of this role. Chiyomaru admits that the indignity of being his own brother's attendant did motivate him and he might not have achieved promotion if this hadn't happened.[3]

In July 2013 with a 4-3 record at makushita 1, he finally achieved promotion to jūryō for the following tournament. When he made his jūryō debut in September 2013 his brother, Chiyoōtori was already in the division, marking the 17th time in history that two brothers were in the professional ranks at the same time.[4] He only managed a 7-8 losing record in his jūryō debut, but followed this with an impressive November tournament, winning 8 of his first 9 bouts and ending with an 11-4 record. In the January 2014 tournament, his success continued, and from the rank of jūryō 6 he logged in a 13-2 record and the championship. Coincidentally, this was the tournament immediately after his younger brother also won the jūryō division with a 13-2 record. This was the first time in history two brothers had achieved consecutive championships.[5]

Chiyomaru's promotion to the top makuuchi division in March 2014 followed his brother's ascension by one tournament and marked the tenth time in history two brothers had been in the highest division at the same time.[6] At an event celebrating his promotion he expressed his incredulity at this turn of events and surmised that perhaps even the two brothers sharing the rank of ōzeki in the future was not out of the range of possibility. In his debut at this level, he defeated several makuuchi veterans and accumulated an 8-4 record on the 12th day before losing his last three bouts to end at 8-7. In the following May tournament he was promoted to maegashira 11, his highest rank to date. He struggled however, losing to a number of wrestlers he had beaten in the previous tournament and logged in only a 5-10 record. This was still enough for him to remain in the top division for the July 2014 tournament. Though he won his first five matches he started to struggle somewhat afterwards, still managing to end the tournament with an 8-7 winning record.[1]

After the May 2015 tournament Chiyomaru fell back to the jūryō division after scoring only three wins against twelve losses. He had to withdraw partway through the September 2015 tournament (with a sprained right acromioclavicular joint) and the January 2016 tournament (due to a knee injury). After a 12 tournament absence he returned to the top division for the July 2017 tournament.

Fighting style[edit]

Chiyomaru relies heavily on pushing and thrusting techniques, or oshi-sumo. His most common winning kimarite are oshi-dashi (push out), hiki-otoshi (pull down) and hataki-komi (slap down).[7] He is at a disadvantage if his opponents manage to grab his mawashi or belt.

Career record[edit]

                                                                                 

Chiyomaru Kazuki[1]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
2007 x x (Maezumo) East Jonokuchi #36
4–3
 
East Jonidan #127
0–1–6
 
East Jonokuchi #32
4–2–1
 
2008 West Jonidan #114
3–4
 
West Jonidan #117
5–2
 
West Jonidan #67
3–4
 
West Jonidan #86
3–4
 
East Jonidan #110
5–2
 
East Jonidan #52
5–2
 
2009 East Jonidan #15
5–2
 
West Sandanme #81
4–3
 
West Sandanme #61
3–4
 
East Sandanme #80
5–2
 
East Sandanme #51
5–2
 
East Sandanme #26
2–5
 
2010 East Sandanme #54
5–2
 
East Sandanme #26
4–3
 
West Sandanme #14
3–4
 
West Sandanme #30
4–3
 
West Sandanme #15
5–2
 
East Makushita #54
3–4
 
2011 West Sandanme #7
4–3
 

Tournament Cancelled
0–0–0
East Makushita #57
5–2
 
East Makushita #28
4–3
 
East Makushita #21
5–2
 
East Makushita #13
2–5
 
2012 East Makushita #24
5–2
 
East Makushita #14
4–3
 
East Makushita #10
4–3
 
East Makushita #8
0–1–6
 
West Makushita #48
6–1
 
West Makushita #21
6–1
 
2013 West Makushita #8
5–2
 
West Makushita #2
3–4
 
East Makushita #5
5–2
 
East Makushita #1
4–3
 
East Jūryō #13
7–8
 
East Jūryō #13
11–4
 
2014 East Jūryō #6
13–2
Champion

 
East Maegashira #12
8–7
 
West Maegashira #11
5–10
 
West Maegashira #16
8–7
 
East Maegashira #11
4–11
 
West Maegashira #16
8–7
 
2015 West Maegashira #14
7–8
 
West Maegashira #16
8–7
 
West Maegashira #13
3–12
 
West Jūryō #5
9–6
 
West Jūryō #1
1–8–6
 
East Jūryō #14
9–6
 
2016 West Jūryō #7
5–6–4
 
West Jūryō #11
7–8
 
East Jūryō #12
9–6
 
East Jūryō #9
10–5
 
East Jūryō #5
8–7
 
East Jūryō #1
6–9
 
2017 West Jūryō #3
7–8
 
East Jūryō #4
8–7
 
East Jūryō #2
9–6
 
West Maegashira #15
9–6
 
West Maegashira #11

 
x
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See also[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]