Chiyoshōma Fujio

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Chiyoshōma Fujio
千代翔馬 富士雄
Chiyoshoma 2016-1.jpg
Personal information
Born Ganbaatar Munkhsaihan
(1991-07-20) July 20, 1991 (age 27)
Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia
Height 1.84 m (6 ft 12 in)
Weight 136 kg (300 lb)
Career
Stable Kokonoe
Current rank see below
Debut September, 2009
Highest rank Maegashira 2 (May, 2017)
Championships 1 (Makushita)
* Up to date as of September 7, 2018.

Chiyoshōma Fujio (千代翔馬 富士雄, born 20 July 1991) is a professional sumo wrestler from Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. He made his debut in September 2009 and reached the top makuuchi division in September 2016. He wrestles for Kokonoe stable. His highest rank is maegashira 2.

Early life and sumo experience[edit]

As a child, Munkhsaihan's father was the equivalent of ōzeki in Mongolian wrestling. He was at his father's side most everywhere he went, and his father would take him to judo and wrestling practice often. In addition his father and Asashōryū's father were acquaintances. These circumstances naturally led to an interest in the sumo world.[1] He met former yokozuna Chiyonofuji when the elder came to Munkhsaihan's region on a sumo tour and through Chiyonofuji's invitation, he transferred to Meitoku Gijuku High School, a school well-known for its sumo program. He left the school in his second year and joined Chiyonofuji's Kokonoe stable.

Career[edit]

He joined at the same time as Aoiyama and the two attended sumo school at the same time and also graduated together. He weighed only a light 87 kilograms when he first stepped into the ring, and there was concern whether or not he could make it on the dohyō. However, thinking of his father, a popular figure of high rank in Mongolian sumo, made him ashamed at the prospect of quitting early and he resolved to stick it out. From his entry into sumo until he reached the sandanme division, he took the ring name Shōma (翔馬). In July 2010, upon reaching sandanme, as is the custom at his stable, he took the 'Chiyo' part of legendary wrestlers from the stable such as Chiyonofuji and Chiyonoyama, and became Chiyoshōma. After a little more than a year, in September 2011, he received promotion to the 3rd division known as makushita. Though he bounced back and forth between sandanme and makushita for a period after this, from November 2012 he was re-promoted to makushita with good enough results to become a makushita regular.[2] Up until this point he had to serve stablemates Chiyomaru and Chiyo'ō who were the same age as him, so this was incentive for him to train hard and work his way up the ranks.[1] For the next three years he would soldier on in the third division, moving slowly upward. In September 2015 he had a commanding 6-1 record and took the yūshō for the 3rd division. This put him at makushita 3 for the next tournament where he achieved another 6-1, guaranteeing his promotion to the salaried ranks of jūryō. At the press conference for his promotion, he stated that six and a half years had been a long time, and he had hoped to reach the professional ranks in four years. He also said that he still had further to rise and he would do his best.[3] A party to celebrate his promotion was held at a hotel in Tokyo at which his parents brought traditional Mongolian outfits for Chiyonofuji and his wife to try out.[4]

In his first two tournaments in jūryō starting in January 2016, he attained two winning tournaments. In the following May tournament he only managed a 7–8, but bounced back to a 9–6 record for the July tournament at jūryō 3, earning him promotion to the top flight makuuchi division. He made his top division debut in the Aki basho of September 2016, the first new makuuchi wrestler from Kokonoe stable since the death of his stablemaster Chiyonofuji on July 31 of that year.[5] Following his entry into makuuchi Chiyoshōma had two consecutive winning tournaments and he is working his way towards the possibility of being a regular makuuchi wrestler.[2] His first tournament fighting all the ōzeki and yokozuna was in May 2017 from the rank of maegashira 2 where he fell short with a 5–10 record.

He was reprimanded during the November 2017 tournament for causing three matta or false starts in his Day 9 match against Hokutofuji by not putting both fists to the ground, and for thrusting at Hokutofuji after the first matta was called.[6][7]

His string of 498 consecutive matches from sumo entry was broken on the final day of the July 2018 tournament when he pulled out due to an injury.

Fighting style[edit]

Chiyoshōma's preferred grip on his opponent's mawashi or belt is hidari-yotsu, a right hand outside, left hand inside position. He uses both pushing and grappling techniques. His most common winning kimarite are hatakikomi (slap down), yorikiri (force out) and uwatenage (overarm throw).

Career record[edit]

  
Chiyoshōma Fujio[2]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
2009 x x x(Maezumo) East Jonokuchi #31
6–1
 
East Jonidan #65
3–4
 
2010 West Jonidan #92
5–2
 
East Jonidan #42
4–3
 
East Jonidan #17
4–3
 
East Sandanme #100
4–3
 
East Sandanme #80
2–5
 
East Jonidan #6
5–2
 
2011 West Sandanme #72
4–3
 

Tournament Cancelled
0–0–0
East Sandanme #55
5–2
 
East Sandanme #13
5–2
 
East Makushita #56
3–4
 
West Sandanme #8
3–4
 
2012 East Sandanme #23
6–1
 
West Makushita #44
2–5
 
West Sandanme #8
5–2
 
West Makushita #48
2–5
 
West Sandanme #11
5–2
 
West Makushita #49
5–2
 
2013 West Makushita #34
3–4
 
East Makushita #41
4–3
 
East Makushita #32
4–3
 
East Makushita #25
3–4
 
West Makushita #33
3–4
 
East Makushita #40
5–2
 
2014 East Makushita #25
5–2
 
West Makushita #18
5–2
 
East Makushita #10
4–3
 
East Makushita #8
3–4
 
East Makushita #13
4–3
 
West Makushita #11
3–4
 
2015 West Makushita #16
2–5
 
West Makushita #30
5–2
 
West Makushita #20
4–3
 
West Makushita #15
4–3
 
East Makushita #11
6–1
Champion

 
West Makushita #3
6–1
 
2016 West Jūryō #12
8–7
 
East Jūryō #10
11–4
 
West Jūryō #2
7–8
 
West Jūryō #3
9–6
 
West Maegashira #12
8–7
 
East Maegashira #10
9–6
 
2017 East Maegashira #6
7–8
 
West Maegashira #7
9–6
 
West Maegashira #2
5–10
 
East Maegashira #5
5–10
 
East Maegashira #8
8–7
 
East Maegashira #6
7–8
 
2018 East Maegashira #7
6–9
 
East Maegashira #10
9–6
 
East Maegashira #6
6–9
 
East Maegashira #8
4–11
 
East Maegashira #15

 
x
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Sumo Journal 2014 September pg 97
  2. ^ a b c "Chiyoshoma Fujio". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2 December 2016. 
  3. ^ Kenoshō and Chiyonoshōma go to Jūryō SANSPO.COM 2015年11月25日(2015 November 25)
  4. ^ "Chiyoshoma's Juryo party". 7 February 2016. Retrieved 5 December 2016. 
  5. ^ "Sumo: Kisenosato seeks 1st championship in Hakuho absence". Kyodo News. 9 September 2016. Retrieved 5 December 2016. 
  6. ^ "千代翔馬、3度合わず 手つき不十分で注意/九州場所 - スポーツ - SANSPO.COM(サンスポ)". Sankei Sports (in Japanese). Sanspo. 20 November 2017. Retrieved 20 November 2017. 
  7. ^ "審判長、待った後に突いた千代翔馬を注意" (in Japanese). The Mainichi. 20 November 2017. Retrieved 20 November 2017. 

External links[edit]