Chlorothiazide

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Chlorothiazide
Chlorothiazide.svg
Chlorothiazide-from-xtal-3D-balls.png
Systematic (IUPAC) name
6-chloro-1,1-dioxo-2H-1,2,4-benzothiadiazine-7-sulfonamide
Clinical data
Trade names Diuril
AHFS/Drugs.com monograph
MedlinePlus a682341
Pregnancy
category
  • US: C (Risk not ruled out)
Legal status
Routes of
administration
Oral, IV
Pharmacokinetic data
Bioavailability low
Metabolism Nil
Biological half-life 45 to 60 hours
Excretion Renal
Identifiers
CAS Registry Number 58-94-6 YesY
ATC code C03AA04
PubChem CID: 2720
IUPHAR/BPS 4835
DrugBank DB00880 YesY
ChemSpider 2619 YesY
UNII 77W477J15H YesY
KEGG D00519 YesY
ChEBI CHEBI:3640 YesY
ChEMBL CHEMBL842 YesY
Chemical data
Formula C7H6ClN3O4S2
Molecular mass 295.72 g/mol
 YesY (what is this?)  (verify)

Chlorothiazide sodium (Diuril) is an organic compound used as a diuretic and as an antihypertensive.[1]

It is used both within the hospital setting or for personal use to manage excess fluid associated with congestive heart failure. Most often taken in pill form, it is usually taken orally once or twice a day. In the ICU setting, chlorothiazide is given to diurese a patient in addition to furosemide (Lasix). Working in a separate mechanism than furosemide, and absorbed enterically as a reconstituted suspension administered through a nasogastric tube (NG tube), the two drugs potentiate one another.

Indications[edit]

Contraindications[edit]

Side effects[edit]

History[edit]

The Research team of Merck Sharp and Dohme Research Laboratories of Beyer, Sprague, Baer, and Novello created a new series of medications, the thiazide diuretics, which includes chlorothiazide. They won an Albert Lasker Special Award in 1975 for this work.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ernst, Michael E.; Grimm, Richard H., Jr. "Thiazide diuretics: 50 years and beyond" Current Hypertension Reviews 2008, volume 4(4), pp. 256-265. doi:10.2174/157340208786241264
  2. ^ http://www.laskerfoundation.org/awards/formaward.htm