Chocianów

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Chocianów
Historic townhouses at the Market Square
Historic townhouses at the Market Square
Flag of Chocianów
Flag
Coat of arms of Chocianów
Coat of arms
Chocianów is located in Lower Silesian Voivodeship
Chocianów
Chocianów
Chocianów is located in Poland
Chocianów
Chocianów
Coordinates: 51°25′N 15°55′E / 51.417°N 15.917°E / 51.417; 15.917
Country Poland
Voivodeship Lower Silesian
CountyPolkowice
GminaChocianów
Established13th century
Town rights1894
Government
 • MayorFranciszek Skibicki
Area
 • Total7.31 km2 (2.82 sq mi)
Population
 (2006)
 • Total8,215
 • Density1,100/km2 (2,900/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+1 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+2 (CEST)
Postal code
59-140
Car platesDPL
ClimateDfb
Websitehttp://www.chocianow.pl

Chocianów [xɔˈt͡ɕanuf] (German: Kotzenau) is a town in Polkowice County, Lower Silesian Voivodeship, in south-western Poland. It is the seat of the administrative district (gmina) called Gmina Chocianów. The town lies approximately 14 kilometres (9 mi) south-west of Polkowice, and 85 kilometres (53 mi) west of the regional capital Wrocław. As of 2006, it has a population of 8,215.

History[edit]

The area, along with Lower Silesia, was part of Poland since the establishment of the state in the 10th century. As a result of the fragmentation of Poland, by the end of the 13th century the area was part of the Polish Duchy of Świdnica, ruled by a local branch of the Piast dynasty. The settlement developed from a castle called Chodzenow built in 1297 by Duke Bolko I the Strict of Świdnica, who had to secure his lands against the claims of Wenceslaus II of Bohemia.

From 1742 Chocianów was part of Prussia and from 1871 to 1945 it was part of Germany, known by its Germanized name of Kotzenau. It received its town privileges in 1894. The town had a population of 4,301 in 1939, but with war deaths and the expulsion of most Germans after the war the population was down to 1,707 in 1946.[1] After Nazi Germany's defeat in World War II the town became again part of Poland.

Gallery[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Columbia-Lippincott Gazetteer. (New York: Columbia University Press, 1952) p. 403


Coordinates: 51°25′N 15°55′E / 51.417°N 15.917°E / 51.417; 15.917