Chocolate truffle

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Chocolate truffle
Truffles with nuts and chocolate dusting in detail.jpg
Type Confection
Place of origin France
Creator N. Petrucelli[1]
Main ingredients Chocolate ganache, chocolate or cocoa powder
Cookbook: Chocolate truffle  Media: Chocolate truffle

A chocolate truffle is a type of chocolate confectionery, traditionally made with a chocolate ganache centre coated in chocolate, cocoa powder or chopped toasted nuts (typically hazelnuts, almonds or coconut), usually in a spherical, conical, or curved shape.

Their name derives from their traditional shape, which resembles the truffle, an edible part of the tuber fungus.

Varieties[edit]

The chocolate truffle is thought to have been first created by N. Petrucelli in Chambéry, France in December 1895.[1] They reached a wider public with the establishment of the Prestat chocolate shop in London by Antoine Dufour in 1902, which still sells "Napoleon III" truffles to the original recipe.[2] There are now three main types of chocolate truffles: European, Swiss, and American:

  • The "French truffle" is made with fresh cream and chocolate and then rolled into cocoa or nut powder.
  • The "Belgian truffle" or praline is made with dark or milk chocolate filled with ganache, buttercream or nut pastes.[3]
  • The "Swiss truffle" is made by combining melted chocolate into a boiling mixture of dairy cream and butter, which is poured into molds to set before sprinkling with cocoa powder. Like the French truffles, these have a very short shelf-life and must be consumed within a few days of making.[4]
  • The "California truffle" is a larger, lumpier version of the French truffle, first made by Alice Medrich in 1973 after she tasted truffles in France. She sold these larger truffles in a charcuterie in the "Gourmet Ghetto" neighborhood of Berkeley, then in 1977 she began selling them in her own store, Cocolat, which soon expanded into a chain. The American craze for truffles started with Medrich.[5]
    • The "American truffle" is a half-egg shaped chocolate-coated truffle, a mixture of dark or milk chocolates with butterfat and, in some cases, hardened coconut oil. Joseph Schmidt, a San Francisco chocolatier, and founder of Joseph Schmidt Confections, is credited with its creation in the mid-1980s.[6]
  • The "European truffle" is made with syrup and a base made up of cocoa powder, milk powder, fats, and other such ingredients to create an oil-in-water type emulsion.[citation needed]
  • The "vegan truffle" can have any shape or flavor, but is adapted to vegetarian diets by replacing dairy with nut milks and butters.[7]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b http://lakes.savoie-mont-blanc.com/home/our-suggestions/local-products-and-recipes/desserts-and-sweetmeats-162-2.html
  2. ^ "Prestat Prestat Chocolate | Chocolate Gifts | Artisan Truffles | Gourmet Chocolates". Prestat.co.uk. Retrieved 2013-05-27. 
  3. ^ "Pralines VS Truffles | makingchocolates". Makingchocolates.wordpress.com. 2011-04-16. Retrieved 2013-05-27. 
  4. ^ Chocolate, Cocoa, and Confectionery: Science and Technology by Bernard W. Minifie (1999), page 545.
  5. ^ Barron, Cheryll Aimee (September 25, 1988). "Madam Cocolat". The New York Times. 
  6. ^ "Sweet surrender", Los Angeles Times, February 8, 2006
  7. ^ "Fine Artisanal Belgian Chocolates". Chocolatsmeurens.com. 2009-03-25. Retrieved 2013-05-27.