Choeroichthys brachysoma

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Short-bodied pipefish
Report on the zoological collections made in the Indo-Pacific Ocean during the voyage of H.M.S. 'Alert' 1881-2 (Pl. III) (5987488983).jpg
Choeroichthys brachysoma at top
Scientific classification edit
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Actinopterygii
Order: Syngnathiformes
Family: Syngnathidae
Genus: Choeroichthys
Species:
C. brachysoma
Binomial name
Choeroichthys brachysoma
Bleeker, 1855
Synonyms[2]
  • Syngnathus brachysoma Bleeker, 1855
  • Dooryichthys brachysoma (Bleeker, 1855)
  • Choeroichthys valencienni Kaup, 1856
  • Doryichthys valenciennii (Kaup, 1856)
  • Doryichthys serialis Günther, 1884

Choeroichthys brachysoma (short-bodied pipefish or Pacific short-bodied pipefish) is a species of marine fish of the family Syngnathidae.[1] It is found in the Indo-Pacific, from the Red Sea and East Africa to the Society Islands, the Philippines, Guam, and northern Australia.[1] It inhabits tide pools, seagrass, rocky coastlines, mangroves, and coral reef areas at depths of 2–25 metres (6.6–82.0 ft), where it can grow to lengths of 7 centimetres (2.8 in).[1][2] C. brachysoma shows sexual dimorphism, the females are slender with two rows of black spots along their flanks, while the males have a shorter, wider body marked with scattered, small white spots.[3] This species is ovoviviparous, with males carrying eggs in a brood pouch until giving birth to live young.[2] Males may brood at 3.5–4 centimetres (1.4–1.6 in).[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Fiegenbaum, H. & Pollom, R. (2015). "Choeroichthys brachysoma". The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. 2015: e.T56852595A82938789. doi:10.2305/IUCN.UK.2015.RLTS.T56852595A82938789.en.
  2. ^ a b c Froese, Rainer and Pauly, Daniel, eds. (2018). "Choeroichthys brachysoma" in FishBase. February 2018 version.
  3. ^ Thompson, Vanessa J. & Dianne J. Bray. "Pacific Shortbody Pipefish, Choeroichthys brachysoma (Bleeker 1855)". Fishes of Australia. Museums Victoria. Retrieved 25 May 2018.

Further reading[edit]