Choices of the Heart: The Margaret Sanger Story

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Choices of the Heart: The Margaret Sanger Story
GenreBiography
Drama
Written byMatt Dorff (uncredited rewrite by Bruce Franklin Singer)
Directed byPaul Shapiro
StarringDana Delany
Henry Czerny
Rod Steiger
Julie Khaner
Music byJonathan Goldsmith
Country of originUnited States
Original language(s)English
Production
Executive producer(s)Jennifer Alward
Producer(s)Julian Marks
Clara George
Paul Shapiro
CinematographyAlar Kivilo
Editor(s)Paul DiCiaula
Running time92 minutes
DistributorMetro-Goldwyn-Mayer
Release
Original release
  • March 8, 1995 (1995-03-08)

Choices of the Heart: The Margaret Sanger Story (1995) is an American television film about the controversial nurse Margaret Sanger who campaigned in the earlier decades of the 20th century in the United States for women's birth control.[1]

Plot[edit]

The New York Times wrote this summary overview: "Dana Delany stars in this made-for-TV movie as Margaret Sanger, a nurse who, in 1914, became a pioneering crusader for women's birth control (she opposed abortion) after she published a booklet on birth control techniques that flew in the face of a law established by Anthony Comstock (Rod Steiger) forbidding the dissemination of information on contraception. Sanger later helped to establish America's first birth control clinic in 1916, and in 1925 was one of the founders of Planned Parenthood."[2]

Critical commentary[edit]

The New York Times television critic John J. O'Connor wrote the movie describes an "extraordinary woman whose contraception crusade eventually led to the founding of Planned Parenthood," adding that the movie "camouflages its sketchiness with some fine performances."[3]

Cast[edit]

Margaret Sanger

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Choices of the Heart: The Margaret Sanger Story (1995)(TV)". IMDb (The Internet Movie Database). 1995-03-08. Retrieved 2009-07-29.
  2. ^ Mark Deming (1995). "Choices of the Heart: The Margaret Sanger Story (1995)". The New York Times. Retrieved 2009-07-29.
  3. ^ John J. O'Connor (1995-03-07). "Critic's Notebook; TV Movies and TV Echoing A Movie". The New York Times. Retrieved 2009-07-29.

External links[edit]