Chongbong Band

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Chongbong Band
Origin Philippines
Genres Hard Rock
Years active 2015 (2015)–present
Associated acts Jenric and CO.
Past members Jenric Ria
Korean name
Chosŏn'gŭl 청봉악단
Hancha 青峰樂團
Revised Romanization Cheongbong akdan
McCune–Reischauer Ch'ŏngbong aktan

Chongbong Band (Chosŏn'gŭl청봉악단; MRCh'ŏngbong aktan) is a North Korean light music choir and orchestra.[1][2] The group consists of seven members:[3] singers and instrumentalists playing mainly brass instruments.[4] According to KCNA, the band members are instrumentalists of the Wangjaesan Art Troupe and singers of the Moranbong Band's chorus.[5]

The Chongbong Band was formed in late July 2015. The creation of the band has been attributed to North Korean leader Kim Jong-un. The Chongbong Band's appearance at the time that another pop group, the Moranbong Band, disappeared sparked rumors about it being a replacement for the latter. However, the Moranbong Band reappeared on 7 September 2015, a week after the Chongbong Band made its public debut in Moscow, Russia.

History[edit]

Creation[edit]

The group was formed on 28 July 2015.[6] Its creation has been attributed to Kim Jong-un.[4] Kim's wife, Ri Sol-ju, was also involved in its creation.[3] Chongbong Band, much like Moranbong Band also attributed to Kim Jong-un, was created to produce "music 'for the people.'"[2]

According to South Korean media[7] and Radio Free Asia, Chongbong Band replaced Moranbong Band whose former members disappeared from the public. Some of them reportedly left the band to get married and others were deported out of the country.[4] Moranbong band, however, returned on 7 September 2015 to perform in a concert attended by Kim Jong-un.[7]

Debut[edit]

In August-September 2015, the band performed with the State Merited Chorus in two concerts in Moscow, Russia: at the Tchaikovsky Concert Hall (ru) on 31 August and at the Moskvich Cultural Center on 1 September.[8][9] The performances in Russia were the band's public debut.[10] The choice of venue in Russia has been interpreted as a signal of hopes of strengthening economic ties between North Korea and Russia.[9]

Other performances[edit]

On October 11, 2015, the band performed in the people's theater, Pyongyang on the occasion of the 70th birthday of the Workers' Party of Korea. On the 19th of the same month, the Chongbong Band performed the same concert in front of Kim Jong-un and his wife Ri Sol-ju. Also attending the concert were members and directors from the Moranbong Band, members of the State Merited Chorus, other artistes and people from Pyongyang. They performed on January 1, 2016, in a New Year's concert at the People's Palace of Culture.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "North Korean National Female Choir to Sing in Moscow". Sputnik. 29 August 2015. Retrieved 3 September 2015. 
  2. ^ a b "North Korea bans music but hails Kim Jong Un's new orchestra". UPI. Retrieved 3 September 2015. 
  3. ^ a b Do Je-hae (7 September 2015). "N. Korean girl band disappears from TV". Korea Times. Retrieved 9 September 2015. 
  4. ^ a b c "N. Korea's all-female music band disappears from broadcasts". Yonhap. 7 September 2015. Retrieved 9 September 2015. 
  5. ^ "Chongbong Band inaugurated". naenara.com.kp. KCNA. 2015-07-30. Retrieved 2015-09-12. 
  6. ^ "Le girls band nord-coréen Moranbong a-t-il disparu de la scène?" [Has the North Korean Girl Band Moranbong Disappeared from Scene?]. Yonhap (in French). 7 September 2015. Retrieved 9 September 2015. 
  7. ^ a b Evans, Stepehen (9 September 2015). "Moranbong, the non-vanishing North Korean band". BBC News. Retrieved 9 September 2015. 
  8. ^ "North Korean all-girl band 'created by Kim Jong-un'". Telegraph.co.uk. 4 September 2015. Retrieved 5 September 2015. 
  9. ^ a b Tomale, Diana (8 September 2015). "North Korea's All-Girl Band Chongbong Orchestra Makes Its Debut At the Tchaikovsky Concert Hall In Moscow". Korea Portal. Retrieved 9 September 2015. 
  10. ^ "N. Korea's all-female band unveiled in Moscow". Yonhap. 2 September 2015. Retrieved 9 September 2015. 

External links[edit]