Chris Coleman (footballer)

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Chris Coleman
Chris Coleman 2015.jpg
Coleman as manager of Wales in 2015
Personal information
Full name Christopher Patrick Coleman[1]
Date of birth (1970-06-10) 10 June 1970 (age 45)[2]
Place of birth Swansea, Wales
Height 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m)[2]
Playing position Defender
Club information
Current team
Wales (manager)
Youth career
0000–1986 Manchester City
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1986–1987 Manchester City 0 (0)
1987–1991 Swansea City 160 (2)
1991–1995 Crystal Palace 154 (13)
1995–1997 Blackburn Rovers 28 (0)
1997–2002 Fulham 136 (8)
Total 478 (23)
National team
1992–2002 Wales 32 (4)
Teams managed
2003–2007 Fulham
2007–2008 Real Sociedad
2008–2010 Coventry City
2011–2012 Larissa
2012– Wales

* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.

† Appearances (Goals).

Christopher Patrick "Chris" Coleman (born 10 June 1970) is a Welsh professional football manager and former player who is the current manager of the Wales national team.

As a player, Coleman usually played in defence, while also occasionally appearing as a forward. He won 32 caps playing for Wales. Coleman's playing career ended at the age of 32, when his leg was broken in a car crash. Following this, Coleman started his coaching career.

In his first full season as manager of Fulham, Coleman guided the club to a respectable ninth-place finish in the 2003–04 Premier League. After leaving Fulham, Coleman was appointed manager of Real Sociedad. However, he resigned in January 2008, citing differences with the incoming president. In February 2008, he returned to England to manage Coventry City, but was dismissed in May 2010 following a disastrous run of results. Coleman then managed Greek side Larissa for the first half of the 2011–12 season before resigning due to financial troubles at the club.

In June 2010, Coleman worked as a commentator for ITV at the 2010 FIFA World Cup in South Africa.[3] He has also worked as a commentator and pundit for Sky Sports.

Personal life[edit]

Coleman was born in Swansea[2] to a family of two sisters. He started school at St Joseph's Roman Catholic Primary School and then went to Bishop Vaughan RC School.[citation needed] As a child, he grew up a keen supporter of Liverpool – his favourite player being Emlyn Hughes. The first professional team he was contracted to was Manchester City, aged 16, although he later left them, citing homesickness as the major reason.[4] He then joined Swansea.[5]

He is married to Sky Sports News presenter Charlotte Jackson. They had a son at the end of 2014.[6][7] He is divorced from Belinda Coleman with whom he has four children.[8] His oldest son Sonny is a football agent.[9]

Club career[edit]

Swansea City[edit]

Coleman made his first professional appearance for his hometown club Swansea City aged 17, in 1987. He made nearly 200 appearances for the south Wales club and helped win the Welsh Cup in 1989 and 1991.[10][11]

Crystal Palace[edit]

After spending four years with Swansea, Coleman was signed by Crystal Palace in 1991 for a transfer fee set by a Football League tribunal at around £270,000, plus a percentage of any future sale. After making 143 appearances, scoring 16 goals in that period – a 1 in 9 record explained by the fact that manager Steve Coppell often used Coleman as a makeshift centre forward. He subsequently moved to Blackburn Rovers. The major lowlight of this period was relegation from the Premier League in 1993, but he did obtain his first cap for Wales while contracted to Crystal Palace.

They accepted a bid of 2.8 Million pounds from Premier League champions Blackburn in 1995, a record transfer fee for palace. Beating their previous by over 3/4 of a million pounds.

In 2005, Palace supporters voted Coleman into their Centenary XI.

Blackburn Rovers[edit]

Coleman joined Premier League champions Blackburn Rovers for a fee of £2.8 million. Blackburn did not retain the Premier League title they had won in 1995, and finished seventh. Coleman made 28 league appearances over his season-and-a-half at the club, and when he found himself out of the starting line-up too often (not helped by a persistent Achilles injury), he took the gamble to further his career by dropping two divisions to join Fulham.

Fulham[edit]

Fulham, at the time in the Second Division, were financed by wealthy businessman Mohamed Al-Fayed, and were able to spend a record transfer fee for the division and club, of over £2 million for Coleman in late 1997. He quickly became club captain, and led Fulham to promotion under manager Kevin Keegan in 1998–99 to the First Division.

He remained captain and a regular in the team under new manager Jean Tigana in the 2000–01 season as Fulham made a successful start to the campaign. However, Coleman's career was ended midway through the season, after he broke his leg in a car crash, near Bletchingley in Surrey on 2 January 2001, just days before an FA Cup tie against Manchester United. He never recovered from this injury despite playing a reserve fixture in March 2002, a game that only served as an indication that he would never again play at the highest level of English football.

International career[edit]

Coleman was capped by Wales at school, youth, under-21 and senior levels.[2][12]

Managerial career[edit]

Fulham[edit]

Coleman joined Fulham's coaching staff in October 2002 under Tigana.[13] He later succeeded the Frenchman as caretaker manager in April 2003, and steered Fulham away from relegation danger. He was named as Fulham's permanent manager in May 2003, beating the more experienced Klaus Toppmöller and George Burley to the post, and also became the youngest manager in the Premier League.[14]

His first full season in charge saw Fulham finish a surprise ninth place, as many pundits tipped them to struggle and for Coleman to be sacked.[15] Many of Fulham's key players, such as Edwin van der Sar, Louis Saha, Steed Malbranque and Luis Boa Morte, were sold in the following years and Fulham did not repeat their earlier successes under Coleman though he kept them clear of relegation. He was sacked on 10 April 2007, after Fulham went on a seven-game winless run.[16]

Real Sociedad[edit]

Coleman moved abroad to manage recently relegated Segunda División side Real Sociedad on 28 June 2007, after being recommended to the club by fellow Welshman and former Real Sociedad manager John Toshack.[17] He was linked with Bolton Wanderers in October 2007[18] though nothing came of it. With the club in 5th place and having only lost once in its previous eleven games, Coleman resigned as manager on 16 January 2008, citing a divergence in vision for the club with newly elected President Iñaki Badiola.[19]

Coventry City[edit]

Coleman was appointed manager of Championship side Coventry City on 19 February 2008, signing a three-and-a-half-year contract. He replaced Iain Dowie, who had been sacked by new owner Ray Ranson.[20]

On 26 August 2008, the BBC reported that Coleman was no longer interested in the international success of Wales.[21] He later denied the allegation, however, telling BBC Radio Wales' Sportstime programme, "I've got to get him [Eastwood] fit for Coventry first and foremost, that's my job. When he is fit, I'd drive him down the motorway myself if I had to for him to play for Wales. I've played for Wales myself and I preferred playing for my country than any club I've played for. I can promise you that I love Wales, I'm very patriotic and that will never change."[22] On 4 May 2010, Coleman was sacked following Coventry's 19th-place finish during the 2009–10 season,[23] their lowest league finish in more than 45 years.

Larissa[edit]

On 26 May 2011, Coleman was appointed as manager of Greek side Larissa.[24] In January 2012, Coleman announced that because of financial troubles at the club he would be quitting from his position as manager.[25]

Wales[edit]

Coleman as manager of Wales in 2015

On 19 January 2012, Coleman was appointed team manager of the Wales national team, as successor to his late friend Gary Speed.[26] His first game in charge was a 2–0 defeat against Mexico in New York on 27 May, after he decided to let assistant manager Osain Roberts take control in the Gary Speed memorial match.

His next game in charge was on 15 August against Bosnia, Wales final match before the World Cup qualifiers started. The game ended in a 2–0 defeat for Wales and finished what was a very disappointing preparation period for Coleman and Wales. The first qualifier against Belgium on 7 September started well for Wales, with their defence holding firm for the first 25 minutes until disaster struck. Referee Stefen Johannesson sent off centre back James Collins for a late lunge on Guillaume Gillet in the 25th minute. This left the Welsh with a tough task, and they ended up losing the game 2–0. The next game was against Serbia 4 days later in Novi Sad which was without numerous of Wales' first choice players. Coleman's Wales lost 6–1 with Gareth Bale scoring their only goal in what was their heaviest defeat in 16 years. On 12 October Coleman picked up his first victory as Wales manager, beating Scotland 2–1 with Bale scoring twice and capping the victory off with a sensational strike in the 88th minute to win the game for Wales. Wales went back to losing ways in their next game however, losing 2–0 to Croatia on 16 October.

Wales started 2013 positively, beating Austria 2–1 on 6 February. On 22 March, Wales did the double over Scotland, beating them 2–1 at Hampden Park and moving into 3rd place in the qualifying group table. Four days later in a qualifier against Croatia, Wales led 1–0 for the majority of the game through a Gareth Bale penalty. Two late goals from Croatia however ended any hopes of qualification.

Career statistics[edit]

Player[edit]

Club performance League Cup League Cup Continental Total
Season Club League Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
England League FA Cup League Cup Europe Total
1987–88 Swansea City Fourth Division 30 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 34 0
1988–89 Third Division 43 0 3 0 2 0 5 0 53 0
1989–90 46 2 4 0 2 0 2 0 54 2
1990–91 41 0 4 1 2 0 8 0 55 1
1991–92 Crystal Palace First Division 18 4 1 0 5 0 0 0 24 4
1992–93 Premier League 38 5 1 0 7 2 0 0 46 7
1993–94 First Division 46 3 1 0 4 0 0 0 51 3
1994–95 Premier League 35 1 7 1 6 0 0 0 48 2
1995–96 First Division 17 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 21 0
1995–96 Blackburn Rovers Premier League 20 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 20 0
1996–97 8 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 9 0
1997–98 0 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 1 0
1997–98 Fulham Second Division 26 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 27 1
1998–99 45 4 7 0 5 1 0 0 57 5
1999–2000 First Division 40 3 3 1 7 1 0 0 50 5
2000–01 25 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 26 0
2001–02 FA Premier League 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Total England & Wales 478 23 36 3 48 4 15 0 576 30
Career total 478 23 36 3 48 4 15 0 576 30

Manager[edit]

As of match played 12 June 2015.
Team From To Record Ref
G W D L Win %
Fulham 17 April 2003 10 April 2007 176 61 44 71 34.7 [27]
Real Sociedad 28 June 2007 16 January 2008 21 8 7 6 38.1 [1]
Coventry City 19 February 2008 4 May 2010 117 34 37 46 29.1 [27]
Larissa 26 May 2011 9 January 2012
Wales 19 January 2012 Present 24 9 5 10 37.5 [27]
Total 338 112 93 133 33.1

Honours[edit]

Player[edit]

Swansea City

Crystal Palace

Fulham

Manager[edit]

Coventry City

Individual[edit]

  • Football League Third Division PFA Team of the Year: 1988–89, 1990–91
  • Football League Second Division PFA Team of the Year: 1997–98, 1998–99
  • Football League First Division PFA Team of the Year: 1999–2000, 2000–01
  • Crystal Palace Player of the Year: 1994

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Coleman: Christopher Patrick Coleman: Matches: 2007–08". BDFutbol. Retrieved 11 July 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h Hugman, Barry J., ed. (2001). The 2001–2002 Official PFA Footballers Factfile. London: AFS. p. 65. ISBN 9-780946-531349. 
  3. ^ http://www.itv.com/presscentre/worldcup2010/week24/default.html
  4. ^ Daniel Taylor. "Coleman in frame for City job". The Guardian. Retrieved 24 August 2015. 
  5. ^ "BBC SPORT - Football - Welsh - Coleman misses Vetch Field derbies". BBC News. Retrieved 24 August 2015. 
  6. ^ Zoe Briggs. "Charlotte Jackson marries Chris Coleman - OK! Magazine". OK! Magazine. Retrieved 24 August 2015. 
  7. ^ Ruth Mosalski (17 May 2015). "Wales manager Chris Coleman and Sky Sports presenter Charlotte Jackson tie the knot". WalesOnline. Retrieved 24 August 2015. 
  8. ^ Kirsty McCormack. "Charlotte Jackson and fiance Chris Coleman welcome perfect baby boy - Celebrity News - Showbiz & TV - Daily Express". Daily Express. Retrieved 24 August 2015. 
  9. ^ Rebecca Pocklington (23 December 2014). "Charlotte Jackson welcomes baby son with Wales football manager Chris Coleman: 'He's perfect!'". Daily Mirror. Retrieved 24 August 2015. 
  10. ^ "Swansea City 5–0 Kidderminster Harriers". Welsh Football Data Archive. Retrieved 10 March 2010. 
  11. ^ "Swansea City 2–0 Wrexham". Welsh Football Data Archive. Retrieved 10 March 2010. 
  12. ^ "Coleman, Chris". National Football Teams. Retrieved 11 July 2015. 
  13. ^ "Coleman retires". Fulham Official Website. 2 October 2002. Retrieved 10 April 2014. 
  14. ^ "Coleman named Fulham boss". BBC Sport. 15 May 2003. Retrieved 19 December 2007. 
  15. ^ "Coleman gets new deal". BBC Sport. 7 July 2004. Retrieved 19 December 2007. 
  16. ^ "Coleman out as Sanchez takes over". BBC Sport. 10 April 2007. Retrieved 19 December 2007. 
  17. ^ "Coleman named Real Sociedad boss". BBC Sport. 28 June 2007. Retrieved 28 June 2007. 
  18. ^ Ogden, Mark (19 October 2007). "Bolton Wanderers eye Chris Coleman". London: The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 19 December 2007. 
  19. ^ "Coleman resigns as Sociedad boss". BBC Sport. 16 January 2008. Retrieved 19 February 2008. 
  20. ^ "Coleman unveiled as Coventry boss". BBC Sport. 19 February 2008. Retrieved 19 February 2008. 
  21. ^ "Coleman 'not interested' in Wales". BBC Sport. 26 August 2008. Retrieved 26 August 2008. 
  22. ^ "Coleman proud of Welsh background". BBC Sport. 3 September 2008. Retrieved 2 February 2009. 
  23. ^ "Chris Coleman sacked by Coventry City". BBC Sport. 4 May 2010. Retrieved 4 May 2010. 
  24. ^ "Greek side Larissa appoint Chris Coleman as manager". BBC Sport. 26 May 2011. 
  25. ^ "Chris Coleman to leave troubled Greece side Larissa". BBC Sport. 9 January 2012. Retrieved 9 January 2012. 
  26. ^ "BBC Sport – Chris Coleman unveiled as Wales manager". BBC Sport. Retrieved 19 January 2012. 
  27. ^ a b c "Managers: Chris Coleman". Soccerbase. Retrieved 11 July 2015. 
  28. ^ "Winners Announced". Football League. 5 April 2009. 

External links[edit]