Christ M. Stauffer

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Christ M. Stauffer
Member of the Wisconsin State Assembly
In office
1956–1963
Personal details
Born (1896-05-25)May 25, 1896
Monticello, Wisconsin
Died October 15, 1964(1964-10-15) (aged 68)
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Ellen Stauffer
Children Ruth Stauffer
Profession Farmer, Blacksmith, Welder Horseshoer, Politician
Religion Reformed German Church

Christ M. Stauffer (May 25, 1896 - October 15, 1963) was an American Republican member of the Wisconsin State Assembly in the late 1950s and early 1960s.

Early life and career[edit]

Stauffer was born in Monticello, Wisconsin, and farmed as a partner with his brother until 1918. He also worked as a blacksmith, welder, and horseshoer.[1] He served in the United States Army during World War I from 1918 to 1919.[2]

Political career[edit]

Vice President of the League of Wisconsin Municipalities for 3 years,Stauffer was active in civic, church, and fraternal organizations. He was Fire Chief from 1928 to 1948; president of school boards from 1930 to 1943; and the Village president from 1935 to 1951. He also served two years each with the selective service board and the county school committee.

Elected to the Wisconsin State Assembly in 1956 and reelected in 1958, 1960 and 1962,Stauffer was Chairman of Assembly Committee on Third Reading; vice-chairman of Commerce and Manufactures Committee, a member of the Agriculture Committee, and served on Interstate Co-operation Committee.

Death[edit]

Stauffer served in the Assembly until his death in 1964.[3][4] He was a member of the Reformed German Church of Monticello, Wisconsin. His place of interrment is unknown.

References[edit]

  1. ^ M. Stauffer%20m.%20stauffer%20wisconsin&f=false Stauffer, Christ M. Wisconsin Blue Book, 1964. Retrieved November 16, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Stauffer, Christ M. 1896". Wisconsin Historical Society. Retrieved 2011-10-21. 
  3. ^ 'Wisconsin Blue Book 1964,' Biographical Sketch of Christ M. Stauffer, pg. 45
  4. ^ Sauerkraut, Suspenders, and the Swiss: A Political History of Green County's Swiss Colony, 1845-1945. iUniverse. Retrieved November 16, 2013. 

External links[edit]