Christ the King College, Isle of Wight

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Christ the King College
Christ the King College upper campus.JPG
Motto Via Veritas Vita
Established 2008
Type Voluntary aided school
Religion Church of England/
Roman Catholic
Head Teacher Mrs Pat Goodhead
Chair of Governors Mr D Lisseter
Location Wellington Road
Newport
Isle of Wight Isle of Wight
PO30 5QT
England England
Local authority Isle of Wight
DfE number 921/4604
DfE URN 135552 Tables
Ofsted Reports
Staff Over 250 employed
Students <4000
Gender Mixed
Ages 11–19
Houses Stevenson, Lisseter, Ratcliff, Hollis
Colours Purple, Gold, Silver
Website www.christ-the-king.iow.sch.uk

Christ the King College is a joint Church of England and Catholic secondary school and sixth form college located in Newport on the Isle of Wight. It was created in September 2008 by amalgamating two older schools, Archbishop King Catholic Middle School and Trinity Church of England Middle School. As such, the school is on two separate campuses, both located close to each other on Wellington Road. Having previously accommodated years 5 to 8, the school now takes students from years 7 to 13 after its plans to extend the age range and become a Church of England and Catholic high school.[1]

History[edit]

The school was formed on September 1st, 2008 when two middle schools on Wellington Road, Archbishop King Catholic Middle and Trinity Church of England Middle merged. This was done in line with the education reforms that were being implemented to schools across the island at the time.[2]

The desire to expand beyond the current age range of 9–13 years was first registered in December 2004, shortly after a new headteacher, Pat Goodhead, was appointed. In 2006, after "outstanding" Ofsted inspections for Trinity, and the need for a new headteacher for Archbishop King, a joint governing body committee was formed and Goodhead was appointed headteacher of both Trinity and Archbishop King. Amalgamation of the two schools moved on as there were positive responses from all involved, including clergy, parents and staff, which was confirmed during an official review. The schools were fully amalgamated in September 2008, resulting in the closure of Trinity and Archbishop King middle schools.[3][4]

Following the new launch, an opening ceremony was held in October 2008.[5]

In the college's first academic year (2008-2009), it accommodated from the original school year ranges of both schools, 5-8. The next year, the school increased their range by 1 to include a year 9 - who were the year 8 students advancing a year - as well as taking in a new year 5 (this was the College's final whole year intake until 2012). Each year until 2013 a new higher year was added to the College's age range through the current highest year moving up. At the beginning of the college's academic year 2013-2014, it had reached its goal to become a full secondary school and sixth form. As the lowest year progressed to the consecutive years above them, the lower years they had moved up (years 5 and 6) were removed from the college's range. It was unique in the United Kingdom in accommodating these age ranges, a reflection of its transformational status from middle to high school.

Site[edit]

The college is based on two separate campuses, each in close proximity to each other on Wellington road. One accommodates years 7 and 8, known as "Lower College", and the other accommodates years 9 to 11, known as "Upper College".

As part of the college's ongoing expansion plans, deliveries of new classrooms to include Science, Art and Design and Technology facilities were made. In addition, a new multi-use games area (MUGA) was put in place on the lower field of the Upper College site, which replaces the playground on which the new sports hall now stands.

After a relatively long delay, construction for the new sixth form accommodation was completed by September 2013, taking only just 25 weeks. Funding has also recently been secured by the college for a complete rebuild as part of the Government’s Priority Schools Building Programme.[6]

Sixth form history[edit]

The Sixth Form Centre was officially opened in a service led by the Right Reverend Philip Egan, Catholic Bishop of Portsmouth and the Right Reverend Christopher Foster, the Church of England’s Bishop of Portsmouth.[7] The service began in the sports hall, attended by the secondary years and staff. This was followed by a procession to the Sixth Form Centre for the second half of the service, which was attended by the sixth form students and staff. The Centre was blessed and officially opened by the two bishops. The service also included the investiture of the principal, Goodhead, as a Dame of the Papal Equestrian Order of Saint Gregory the Great.

Papal Honour[edit]

In September 2013 it was announced that the principal of the college, Goodhead, was to be presented with a Papal Honour for her services to the Catholic Church in education. The award was presented by Egan on December 11th, 2013, during the opening service for the sixth form. Goodhead was subsequently also made a Dame of the Papal Equestrian Order of Saint Gregory the Great.

Examination and inspection results[edit]

The 2012 pass rates for the school, in its first year of results, were 77.1% 5+ A*-C including English and Maths for GCSE.[8] Ofsted inspectors visted the college in April 2014, with Goodhead saying that she was proud of the results. Stating that "Goodhead, governors and key leaders were relentless in their drive for excellence", the school showed examples of outstanding practice. They also praised the college's sixth form, stating it was good and preparing students well for the future. Ofsted inspectors said that to improve, the students' work needed to be "more consistent", with them staying focused in classes. However, Ofsted rated it as "good" overall, a high achievement for a newly-opened school, commenting it was "knocking on the door of outstanding".[9]

Primary school leadership[edit]

At the start of the new academic year, beginning September 2013, Christ the King College will assume Governance of Newport C of E Primary School.[10] This was implemented as an initiative to bring the primary school out of special measures, which the school was put into after a recent Ofsted inspection. Goodhead will assume the post of Executive Leadership and Support at Newport C of E. On behalf of the board of governors of the primary school, Mr Andy Rolf stated that the school will "come under the leadership of Christ the King College". The acting headteacher will be Mr Jerry Seaward, a "very experienced senior leader", with Mrs Goodhead providing executive leadership and support. Rolf believes the partnership will "bring benefits to both Newport C of E Primary and Christ the King College", allowing the schools to make "rapid progress".[11]

References[edit]