Elmwood Christavia Mk I

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Christavia Mk I
Christavia MK I (N145WK).jpg
Christavia Mk I
Role Homebuilt aircraft
National origin Canada
Designer Ron Mason
First flight 1982
Introduction 1981
Number built 350 (2002)[1]
Variants Christavia Mk IV
Christavia Mk I
Christavia Mk I
Christavia Mk I

The Christavia Mk I is a Canadian homebuilt aircraft designed by Ron Mason. The aircraft is supplied in the form of plans for amateur construction. Designed for missionary flying in Africa, the aircraft's name means "Christ-in-Aviation".

The Christavia Mk I was first completed and registered as a Christavia CA-05 with Transport Canada on October 1, 1981 and first flew in 1982.[2][3] Over 350 had been completed and flown by 2002.[1]

Design and development[edit]

The Christavia is a single engine, high wing, conventional landing gear-equipped aircraft. The fuselage is of 4130 steel tube construction. The wings are flapless, predominantly wooden, use a custom Mason airfoil design and are supported by dual wing struts. The exterior is finished with aircraft fabric covering. The acceptable power range is 65 to 100 hp (48 to 75 kW) and the standard powerplant used is the 65 hp (48 kW) Continental A65 four stroke four cylinder horizontally opposed piston aircraft engine.[1][4][5][6]

Plans are marketed by Aircraft Spruce & Specialty Co.[1][4][5][6][7] Ron Mason sold the rights to the Christavia series of aircraft to Aircraft Spruce and no longer supplies the plans or support.[8]

The designer estimated the construction time as 2000 hours.[1]

Operational history[edit]

s/n 291 C-FDWS registered as L-16 Replica
Christavia Mk I

In January 2016 forty-two examples of the Christavia series of aircraft were registered with Transport Canada and sixty-one in the United States with the FAA.[9][10]

Variants[edit]

Christavia Mk I
Two seat tandem[6]
Christavia Mk II
Two seat side-by-side
Christavia Mk IV
Four place 150 hp (112 kW)[6]

Specifications (Christavia Mk I)[edit]

Data from Original Plans s/n 291

General characteristics

  • Crew: 1
  • Capacity: 1 passenger
  • Length: 20 ft 8 in (6.30 m)
  • Wingspan: 32 ft 6 in (9.91 m)
  • Height: 7 ft 0 in (2.13 m)
  • Wing area: 146.25 sq ft (13.587 m2)
  • Airfoil: Mason[11]
  • Empty weight: 745 lb (338 kg)
  • Gross weight: 1,300–1,500 lb (590–680 kg)
  • Fuel capacity: 18 US gallons (68 l; 15 imp gal)
  • Powerplant: 1 × Continental A-65 horizontally opposed piston aircraft engine, 65 hp (48 kW)
  • Propellers: 2-bladed wooden

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 120 mph (193 km/h; 104 kn)
  • Cruise speed: 105 mph (169 km/h; 91 kn)
  • Stall speed: 40 mph (64 km/h; 35 kn)
  • Range: 350 mi (304 nmi; 563 km)
  • Service ceiling: 15,000 ft (4,600 m)
  • Rate of climb: 1,000 ft/min (5.1 m/s)

See also[edit]

Aircraft of comparable role, configuration and era

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Downey, Julia: 2003 Plans Aircraft Directory, Kitplanes, Volume 20, Number 1, January 2003, page 20. Primedia Publications. ISSN 0891-1851
  2. ^ System, Government of Canada; Transport Canada; Civil Aviation; General Aviation; Aircraft Registration and Leasing; Canadian Civil Aircraft Register; General Aviation System; Civil Aviation (2013-08-28). "Canadian Civil Aircraft Register". Retrieved 2016-02-05. 
  3. ^ Lowry, D.H.D (May 1984). "Building a Christavia MK I" (PDF). Sport Aviation. Experimental Aviation Association. Vol. 33, No.5: 32–33. [permanent dead link]
  4. ^ a b "Project Patrol George Stulgatis' Christavia Mk I". Experimenter. 
  5. ^ a b "Building a Christavia". Air Progress: 30. April 1991. 
  6. ^ a b c d Purdy, Don: AeroCrafter - Homebuilt Aircraft Sourcebook, Fifth Edition, page 150. BAI Communications, 15 July 1998. ISBN 0-9636409-4-1
  7. ^ Aircraft Spruce & Specialty Co (2013). "Christavia". Retrieved 14 December 2013. 
  8. ^ "CHRISTAVIA MK-1 AND MK-2 from Aircraft Spruce". www.aircraftspruce.com. Retrieved 2016-02-03. 
  9. ^ "FAA Registry - Aircraft - Make / Model Inquiry". registry.faa.gov. Retrieved 2016-02-03. 
  10. ^ System, Government of Canada; Transport Canada; Civil Aviation; General Aviation; Aircraft Registration and Leasing; Canadian Civil Aircraft Register; General Aviation System; Civil Aviation (2013-08-28). "Canadian Civil Aircraft Register". Retrieved 2016-02-03. 
  11. ^ Lednicer, David (2010). "The Incomplete Guide to Airfoil Usage". Retrieved 13 October 2014. 

External links[edit]