Christian-Social People's Party (Liechtenstein)

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Christian-Social People's Party

Christlich-Soziale Volkspartei
AbbreviationVP
FounderWilhelm Beck
Founded1918 (1918)
Dissolved1936 (1936)
Merged intoPatriotic Union
NewspaperLiechtensteiner Nachrichten
(Liechtenstein News)
IdeologySocial liberalism
ColoursRed

The Christian-Social People's Party (German: Christlich-Soziale Volkspartei), often shortened to People's Party (German: Volkspartei, VP), was a social liberal political party in Liechtenstein.[1] Founded in 1918, it and the Progressive Citizens' Party (FBP) were the first political parties in Liechtenstein.[2]

History[edit]

The party was established in 1918 as an offshoot of the trade union movement.[3] It first formed the country's government following the 1922 elections, and remained in power until losing the 1928 elections.

In 1936 it merged with Liechtenstein Homeland Service (LHD) to form the Patriotic Union (VU).[4]

Electoral performance[edit]

Election Votes % Seats +/– Position Government
1918
5 / 12
Increase 5 Increase 2nd Opposition
1922
11 / 15
Increase 6 Increase 1st Majority
1926 (Jan)
9 / 15
Decrease 2 Steady 1st Majority
1926 (Apr)
9 / 15
Steady 0 Steady 1st Majority
1928
4 / 15
Decrease 5 Decrease 2nd Opposition
1930
0 / 15
Decrease 4 N/A N/A
1932
2 / 15
Increase 2 Increase 2nd Opposition

Ideology[edit]

The VP advocated an expansion of democracy and progressive social policies, and was also supportive of the country's constitutional monarchy.[3] Due to its pro-democratic social liberal leanings and party colours, party members were often referred to disparagingly as "Reds".[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Christlich-soziale Volkspartei". e-archiv.li (in German). Liechtenstein National Archives. Retrieved 22 February 2014.
  2. ^ "History". Fürstentum Liechtenstein. Government of Liechtenstein Marketing. Archived from the original on 21 February 2014. Retrieved 13 February 2014.
  3. ^ a b Vincent E McHale (1983) Political parties of Europe, Greenwood Press, p609 ISBN 0-313-23804-9
  4. ^ "Parties in Liechtenstein 1921-1943". Prince and People: Liechtenstein Civics (in German). School Office of the Principality of Liechtenstein. 2007. Archived from the original on 1 August 2012. Retrieved 13 February 2014.