Christian Democratic Party (United Kingdom)

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Christian Democratic Party
AbbreviationCDP
LeaderChristine West
ChairpersonJames Caffery
Secretary GeneralPaul Kennedy
Founded25 February 1999; 20 years ago (1999-02-25)
HeadquartersMiddleton,
England, UK[1]
IdeologyChristian democracy
Liberal conservatism
Political positionCentre-right
Website
christiandemocraticparty.co.uk

The Christian Democratic Party, or CDP is a Christian democratic political party in the United Kingdom. The party was founded as a successor to the ProLife Party in the late 20th century. It is similar to the CDU/CSU in Germany, the ÖVP in Austria and Fine Gael in Ireland, with similar ideology and all operating as catch-all parties of the centre-right.

History[edit]

The first Christian democratic party in Britain, the CDP finds its foundation going back to the ProLife Party, when it was registered as an official party in British politics (later renamed the ProLife Alliance). It aimed at ensuring families where protected and respected for their human dignity at every single stage and circumstance of life. When the group de-registered as an official party and continued as an alliance pressure group, catholics and protestants within wanted to continue politically with its aims and objectives but within a broader context of Christian democracy which addressed the concerns of people. Two parties developed from the alliance, the Christian Democratic Party and the Resurgence Party and in 2012 the Resurgence Party merged with the CDP.

While the CDP traces its Christian roots back to Catholic social teaching, as a champion for religious freedom it welcomes protestant, non-denominational and non-Christians who support its values, the Christian and humanitarian understanding of man, the need to protect human dignity, and the protection of individual freedom within responsibility for the individual and the community.[2] The party campaigns on Christian democratic resurgence, using Christian values to promote freedom, solidarity and social justice within the United Kingdom and Europe.

Elections[edit]

West stood in the 2001 general election in Heywood and Middleton, receiving 345 votes (0.9%).[3] West had previously stood for the Referendum Party in the same constituency in 1997.[4] She stood in local elections in 2002[5] and 2003.[6][7] The party contested the 2004 European Elections in the Wales constituency, gaining 6,821 votes (0.7%).[8]

The party had an income of £671 in 2004,[6] £25 in 2005,[9] £0 in 2006,[10] £25 in 2007 and £380 in 2008.[11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Christian Democratic Party". Register of political parties. Electoral Commission. Archived from the original on 27 March 2010. Retrieved 8 February 2010.
  2. ^ https://resurgenceuk.wordpress.com/about/our-roots/
  3. ^ "Past election results". Middleton Guardian. 25 February 2005. Retrieved 8 February 2010.
  4. ^ "Heywood & Middleton". Vote 2001. BBC News. Retrieved 8 February 2010.
  5. ^ "Was Pride the success they claim?". Middleton Guardian. 26 February 2002. Retrieved 8 February 2010.
  6. ^ a b "Christian Democratic Party Statement of Accounts 2004" (PDF). Electoral Commission. Archived from the original (PDF) on 30 July 2009. Retrieved 8 February 2010.
  7. ^ "How you voted last time". Middleton Guardian. 7 May 2004. Retrieved 8 February 2010.
  8. ^ "The 2004 European Parliamentary elections in the United Kingdom: The official report" (PDF). Electoral Commission. December 2004. Archived from the original (PDF) on 5 January 2009. Retrieved 8 February 2010.
  9. ^ "Christian Democratic Party Statement of Accounts 2005" (PDF). Electoral Commission. Archived from the original (PDF) on 30 July 2008. Retrieved 8 February 2010.
  10. ^ "Christian Democratic Party Statement of Accounts in 2006" (PDF). Electoral Commission. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 July 2008. Retrieved 8 February 2010.
  11. ^ "Christian Democratic Party Statement of Accounts 2008" (PDF). Electoral Commission. Archived from the original (PDF) on 29 July 2009. Retrieved 8 February 2010.

External links[edit]