Christiane Sourvinou-Inwood

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Christiane Sourvinou-Inwood
Born (1945-02-26)February 26, 1945
Volos, Greece
Died May 19, 2007(2007-05-19) (aged 62)
Oxford, UK
Cause of death cancer
Nationality Greek
Spouse(s) Michael Inwood
Academic background
Alma mater University of Athens (BA), University of Oxford (DPhil)
Thesis title Minoan and Mycenaean Afterlife Beliefs
Thesis year 1973
Academic work
Discipline Classics
Sub discipline Ancient Greek religion
Institutions University of Reading
Notable works "What is Polis Religion" and "Further Aspects of Polis Religion" (1990, republished in 2000), "Reading" Greek Culture (1991)

Christiane Sourvinou-Inwood (Greek: Χριστιάνα Σουρβίνου; February 26, 1945 - May 19, 2007) was a scholar in the field of Ancient Greek religion and one of the most influential Hellenists.

Biography[edit]

Sourvinou was born in Volos, Greece, in 1945, but grew up in Corfu. Sourvinou-Inwood studied at the University of Athens, and began research in the field of Mycenology in Rome and later in Athens.

She graduated from Oxford in 1973 with a doctorate on Minoan civilization and Mycenaean beliefs in the afterlife. She was a lecturer at Liverpool (1976–78), and a senior research Fellow at University College, Oxford (1990–95). Also she worked as Reader in Classical Literature at the University of Reading (1995–98). According to the University of Reading Classics Department, Sourvinou-Inwood's acknowledged supremacy in the area of Greek religion studies made a lasting contribution to the Department's research, and this field continues to be one of its strongholds in the twenty-first century.[1]

Polis-religion model[edit]

One of Sourvinou-Inwood's most influential pieces of work was her Polis-religion model. This was originally published in two articles, "What is Polis Religion?" and "Further Aspects of Polis Religion".[2]

Honours[edit]

Selected bibliography[edit]

  • Theseus as Son and Stepson: A Tentative Illustration of Greek Mythological Mentality (1979); ISBN 0900587393
  • Studies in Girls' Transitions: Aspects of the Arkteia and Age Representation in Attic Iconography (1988)
  • "Reading" Greek Culture: Texts and Images, Rituals and Myths (1991); ISBN 0-19-814750-3[4]
  • "Reading" Greek Death: To the End of the Classical Period (1995); ISBN 019814976X
  • "What is Polis Religion?" and "Further Aspects of Polis Religion" in Oxford Readings in Greek Religion (edited by Richard Buxton 2000)
  • Tragedy and Athenian Religion (2003); ISBN 0739104004
  • Athenian Myths and Festivals: Aglauros, Erechtheus, Plynteria, Panathenaia, Dionysia (posthumously edited and published by Robert Parker 2011); ISBN 9780199592074

Novels[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ https://www.reading.ac.uk/classics/about/class-history.aspx A Short History of Reading's Classics Department
  2. ^ Originally published in The Greek city: from Homer to Alexander (1990) edited by Oswyn Murray and Simon Price and republished in Oxford Readings in Greek Religion (2000) edited by Richard Buxton
  3. ^ Resulting in the publication of Sourvinou-Inwood, Christiane (2003). Tragedy and Athenian Religion. Lexington Books. ISBN 9780739104002. 
  4. ^ Barringer, Judith M. (4 March 2014). "Review of "Reading" Greek Culture". Bryn Mawr Classical Review. Retrieved 23 January 2017. 

External links[edit]