Christina Gerhardt

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Christina Gerhardt is an author, academic and journalist. She has written on a range of subjects, including the environment, film and critical theory. Currently, she is the Currie C. and Thomas A. Barron Visiting Professor of Environment and the Humanities at the High Meadows Environmental Institute at Princeton University.[1] She has held visiting positions at Harvard University,[2] the Free University of Berlin,[3] Columbia University and University of California at Berkeley,[4] where she taught previously and is now a Senior Fellow. She has been awarded grants from the Fulbright Commission,[5] the DAAD and the National Endowment for the Humanities.[6] Her journalism has been published (under Tina Gerhardt) in Grist, The Nation, The Progressive and Sierra Magazine, among other venues.

Writing[edit]

Gerhardt has made important contributions to a number of fields, notably environmental humanities, film studies and critical theory.

Environmental Humanities[edit]

Professor Gerhardt is Editor-in-Chief of ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment, the quarterly journal of the Association for the Study of Literature and Environment (ASLE), published by Oxford University Press. Gerhardt has written about walking and experiential learning, civic engagement and citizen science; about human-animal-environment entanglement; about petro-cultures and petro-landscapes, e.g. plastic and the Pacific; about sea level rise and islands; and about future shorelines. She also uses site specific public art installations to foster civic engagement. She has led walking tours, with both classes and the public, revealing the past histories of urban landscapes, considering how the present day environment came to be shaped, and imagining possible future geographies.

Film Studies[edit]

Gerhardt has written about new wave cinemas of the long sixties, including feminist and political cinema, about the representation of the Red Army Faction in film, about New German Cinema and the Berlin School, and about directors ranging from Helke Sander and Harun Farocki to Rainer Werner Fassbinder and Hito Steyerl.

Critical theory[edit]

Gerhardt has published on critical theory and on Theodor W. Adorno. Her writings examine the concept of nature and of animals in the writings of the Frankfurt School's first generation. She has published articles on Adorno and nature; on nature in Adorno and Kracauer; on animals and compassion in the writings of Adorno, Horkheimer and Schopenhauer; and on animals in Adorno, Cixous, Derrida and Levinas.

Awards[edit]

  • DAAD Faculty Research Award
  • Fulbright Commission - Junior Research Grant

Selected publications[edit]

Books[edit]

Edited volumes[edit]

Special Issues[edit]

Environmental Humanities - Recent Articles and Book Chapters[edit]

Film - Recent Articles and Book Chapters[edit]

  • Christina Gerhardt and Marco Abel. "Introduction: German Screen Cultures and the Long 1968." in Celluloid Revolt: German Screen Cultures and the Long 1968. Co-Edited by Christina Gerhardt and Marco Abel. Rochester: Camden House, 2019. pp. 1–23.
  • Christina Gerhardt. "Helke Sander's dffb Films and the West German Feminist Movement." in Celluloid Revolt: German Screen Cultures and the Long 1968. Co-Edited by Christina Gerhardt and Marco Abel. Rochester: Camden House, 2019. pp. 69–86.
  • Christina Gerhardt and Sara Saljoughi. "Looking Back: Global Cinema and the Legacy of New Waves around 1968." in 1968 and Global Cinema. Co-Edited by Christina Gerhardt and Sara Saljoughi. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2018. pp. 1–20.
  • "Internationalism and the Early Student Films of the German Film and Television Academy Berlin (dffb)." in 1968 and Global Cinema. Co-Edited by Christina Gerhardt and Sara Saljoughi. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 2018. pp. 96–116.
  • "On Liberated Women in an Un-Liberated Society: Ula Stöckl's The Cat Has Nine Lives (1968)." in Women, Global Protest Movements and Political Agency: Rethinking the Legacy of 1968. Co-Edited by Sarah Colvin and Katharina Karcher. New York: Routledge, 2018. pp. 69–83.
  • Gerhardt, Christina (2017). "Fassbinder's Mother Küsters Goes to Heaven (1975) in a Genealogy of the Arbeiterfilme". Film Criticism. 41 (1). doi:10.3998/fc.13761232.0041.109.
  • Gerhardt, Christina (2017). "1968 and the Early Cinema of the dffb". The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics and Culture. 10 (1): 1–19. doi:10.1080/17541328.2017.1326731.
  • Gerhardt, Christina (2017). "Introduction: Cinema in West Germany around 1968". The Sixties: A Journal of History, Politics and Culture. 10 (1): 1–9. doi:10.1080/17541328.2017.1327749.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Princeton University". Princeton.edu. 2021-01-01. Retrieved 2021-01-01.
  2. ^ "Harvard University". Harvard.edu. Retrieved 2006-03-15.
  3. ^ "Berlin Program Fellows 2006-2007; Free University". fu-berlin.de. Retrieved 2006-03-01.
  4. ^ "UC-Berkeley". Berkeley.edu. Retrieved 2006-03-11.
  5. ^ "Fulbright". Berkeley.edu. Retrieved 2006-03-11.
  6. ^ "National Endowment for the Humanities". Retrieved 2017-05-15.

External links[edit]