Christopher J. Schneider

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Christopher J. Schneider
Born (1979-04-16) April 16, 1979 (age 39)
Chicago, Illinois
Residence Brandon, Manitoba
Nationality American
Citizenship
  • United States
  • Canada
Alma mater Arizona State University
Northern Illinois University
Northeastern Illinois University
Known for Research and commentary on social media, crime, policing, popular culture, qualitative research methods
Awards

Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction Early-in-Career Award 2016[1]

Canadian Criminal Justice Association Public Education Award (2017)[2]
Scientific career
Fields Sociology, Criminology
Institutions Brandon University
Wilfrid Laurier University
University of British Columbia
Thesis Mass Media, Popular Culture, and Technology: Communication and Information Formats as Emergent Features of Social Control (2008)
Doctoral advisor David Altheide
Website www.chrisschneider.org
twitter.com/sundaysociology

Christopher J. Schneider (born April 16, 1979) is an American sociologist and associate professor of sociology at Brandon University.[3]

Educational background[edit]

Schneider received his B.A. summa cum laude in 2002 from Northeastern Illinois University, with a major in sociology and a minor in criminal justice. Schneider was selected as the NEIU 2002 spring commencement speaker [4] He received an M.A. in Sociology with a concentration in Criminology in 2004 from Northern Illinois University[5] Schneider continued his graduate studies in Justice Studies at Arizona State University. In 2008, he graduated from ASU with a Doctoral Degree in Justice Studies.[3]

Appointments and positions[edit]

While studying toward his M.A. he was an instructor at NIU. From 2004-2008 Schneider was a part-time instructor and a teaching assistant at ASU. After receiving his PhD in Justice Studies in 2008, Schneider began his career as an assistant professor of sociology at the University of British Columbia, Okanagan campus where he taught for six years.[6] In 2014, Schneider relocated to Wilfrid Laurier University where he was granted tenure and promoted to the position of Associate Professor of Law & Society. He relocated to Brandon University in 2015 where he is presently an associate professor of sociology[3]

In November 2016, Schneider held the Public Visiting Scholar position in the Department of Criminology at WLU, a position offered to a scholar with "innovative research with public appeal".[7][8][9] He has also been invited to hold the Endowed Chair of Criminology and Criminal Justice position at St. Thomas University in Fredericton, New Brunswick, Canada. The Endowed Chair at STU is "offered to a scholar with a well-established record of research." [7]

Schneider is a member of various editorial boards, e.g.,[10] including the Editorial Board of The Annual Review of Interdisciplinary Justice Research (IJR),[11] Canada's only interdisciplinary journal of justice studies.[12] Schneider is a member of the Brandon, MB John Howard Society Board of Directors[13]

Areas of research[edit]

Schneider's research is qualitative and focuses on how developments in media and technology contribute to changes in social interaction and social control.[6][14] His book Policing and Social Media: Social Control in an Era of New Media illustrates the process by which new information technology—namely, social media—and related changes in communication formats have affected the public face of policing and police work in Canada.[14] Policing and Social Media has been well-received by an array of critics that include academics,[15][16] police practitioners,[17] journalists,[18] and activists.[19] Policing and Social Media reached No. 1 on Amazon's list of Hot New Releases in Canadian politics.[20]

According to a review in the academic journal Symbolic Interaction, "Policing and Social Media is essential reading for scholars of media and crime."[14] A review in the Police Journal: Theory, Practice and Principles said "This book is timely and of major importance given the increasingly central role social media now occupies in global policing, governance and accountability discourses.[17] Alexandre Turgeon writes in the American Review of Canadian Studies: "In light of the many high-profile and recent police shootings in the United States, and the way that they were framed on YouTube and other social media sites, this book is a significant contribution on the field of policing and information".[16]

The book has also been profiled extensively in news media.[2] A review in Canadian news magazine Maclean's called Policing and Social Media "surprisingly populist".[18] Community activist and freelance writer Tom Sandborn[21] (in a review he wrote published in the Vancouver Sun), called the book "important" continuing "Schneider has done a fine job with this study, and anyone in Canada who cares about policing, privacy, civil liberties and personal freedom should read it"[19]

Schneider's work has focused on the impact of social media on crime related matters including vigilante justice[22] and crowd sourced-policing efforts online.[23][24] Much of this research has examined the role of social media in relation to the 2011 Vancouver Stanley Cup riot[25][23][26] Some of this research is cited in Policing Canada in the 21st Century: New Policing for New Challenges a 2014 Council of Canadian Academies report that addresses the external and internal challenges facing Canada's police.[27] Other related research has explored the impact of social media on policing and police work in Canada.[28][29]

Schneider's research has also focused on popular culture and social control. Some of this work has examined the relationships between media and popular culture including the framing and censorship of rap music[30] and the use of mobile phone ringtones as individual ways to manage identity.[31] Other work in the area of popular culture has explored celebrity news coverage and TMZ[32]

Publications[edit]

Schneider has written or collaborated on five books and has published dozens of academic journal articles, book chapters, and essays.

Books[edit]

  • Hannem, S, Sanders, C.B., Schneider, C.J., Doyle, A., & Christensen, T. (eds) (2018). Security and Risk Technologies in Criminal Justice: Critical Perspectives. Toronto, ON: Canadian Scholars.
  • Schneider, C.J. (2016). Policing and Social Media: Social Control in an Era of New Media. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books | Rowman & Littlefield.
  • Hanemaayer, A., & Schneider, C.J. (eds) (2014). The Public Sociology Debate: Ethics and Engagement. Vancouver, BC: University of British Columbia Press.
  • Altheide, D., & Schneider, C.J. (2013). Qualitative Media Analysis Second Edition. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.
  • Aguiar, L., & Schneider, C.J. (eds) (2012). Researching Amongst Elites: Challenges and Opportunities in Studying Up. London: Ashgate.

Awards[edit]

  • 2017 Canadian Criminal Justice Association, Public Education Award, "Recognizes persons who significantly advance public understandings in Canada for the need for, and elements of, a humane, effective criminal justice system."[33]
  • 2016 Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction, Early-In-Career-Award, "Honors those scholars who have made significant contributions within the first ten years since the completion of their PhDs."[34]
  • 2013 The Confederation of University Faculty Associations of British Columbia, Distinguished Academics Early-In-Career Award, for "outstanding contributions made by scholars at relatively early stages."[35]
  • 2011 University of British Columbia, Award for Teaching Excellence and Innovation[36]
  • 2010 University of British Columbia, Award for Public Education Through Media for "actively and creatively sharing research expertise via news media."[37]
  • 2002 American Society of Criminology, Division of Critical Criminology Graduate Student Paper of the Year Award, "recognizes and honors outstanding theoreotical or empirical critical criminological scholarship by a graduate student."[38]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Society for the Study of Symbolic Interaction (2016). [1], Research earns BU professor international award, invitations to visiting scholar and endowed chair roles.
  2. ^ a b Public education and outreach efforts earn BU professor national award, Brandon University, November 13, 2017
  3. ^ a b c Christopher J. Schneider, Faculty Arts Profile Brandon University. Retrieved July 8, 2016.
  4. ^ Christopher J. Schneider, Northeastern Illinois University 2002 Spring Commencement Speech, Retrieved March 28, 2015.
  5. ^ Northern Illinois University, Department of Sociology, Our Graduates. Where Are They Now? Retrieved March 28, 2015.
  6. ^ a b * Altheide, D., & Schneider, C.J. (2013). Qualitative Media Analysis Second Edition" Newbury Park, CA: Sage.
  7. ^ a b Research Earns BU Professor International Award, Invitations to Visiting Scholar and Endowed Chair Roles, [2] Brandon University, September 30. Retrieved October 5, 2016.
  8. ^ Laurier Brantford to host public lecture on policing and social media, [3] Wilfrid Laurier University, November 3, 2016. Retrieved January 5, 2017.
  9. ^ Police turn trigger fingers into twitter fingers, [4] The Sputnik, November 16, 2016. Retrieved January 5, 2017.
  10. ^ Criminological Encounters Editorial Team. Accessed May 2017
  11. ^ Centre for Interdisciplinary Justice Studies Editorial Team. Accessed May 2017.
  12. ^ About IJR Aims and Scope. Accessed May 2017.
  13. ^ Christopher J. Schneider, About Me, Retrieved March 28, 2015.
  14. ^ a b c Schneider, C.J. (2016). Policing and Social Media: Social Control in an Era of New Media." Lanham, MD: Lexington Books | Rowman & Littlefield
  15. ^ Wiest, J. (2017). Social Media and Media Logics Shape Policing in the Digital Age. Symbolic Interaction.
  16. ^ a b Turgeon, A. (2017) Policing and social media: social control in an era of new media. American Review of Canadian Studies
  17. ^ a b Coliandris, G. (2017). Book Review: Policing and Social Media: Social Control in an Era of New Media. The Police Journal: Theory, Practice and Principles, Pp. 1-4. Sage Publications.
  18. ^ a b Brian Bethune, The Police vs. Social Media Maclean's Magazine, April 16, 2016. Retrieved July 8, 2016.
  19. ^ a b Tom Sandborn, Review: Is Big Brother Your Facebook Friend? Vancouver Sun, July 8, 2016. Retrieved July 8, 2016.
  20. ^ Rob Henderson, BU Professor's New Book Follows Police on Social Media Brandon University, March 30, 2016. Retrieved July 8, 2016.
  21. ^ Sandborn, T.. (2015). The 5-Minute Freelancer Q&A #20 - Tom Sandborn. Posted on April 22, 2015.
  22. ^ Tiffany Crawford, Online Vigilantes Can Slow Police Investigations, UBC Study on Stanley Cup Riot Concludes, Vancouver Sun, October 31, 2012. Retrieved March 28, 2015.
  23. ^ a b * Schneider, C.J. & Trottier, D. (2012). The 2011 Vancouver Riot and the Role of Facebook in Crowd-Sourced Policing. BC Studies 175: 57-72.
  24. ^ Sunny Dhillon, Stanley Cup Riot ‘Lightning Rod’ Goes Uncharged, Globe and Mail, September 25, 2012. Retrieved March 28, 2015.
  25. ^ * Schneider, C.J. & Trottier, D. (2013). Social Media and the 2011 Vancouver Riot. Studies in Symbolic Interaction 40: 335-362.
  26. ^ Nick Lewis, Social Media and the 2011 Vancouver Riots, ArtsWIRE, June 14, 2013. Retrieved March 28, 2015.
  27. ^ Council of Canadian Academies, 2014. Policing Canada in the 21st Century: New Policing for New Challenges. Ottawa, ON: The Expert Panel on the Future of Canadian Policing Models. Council of Canadian Academies (p. 31). Retrieved April 7, 2015.
  28. ^ James Keller, Police on Twitter Good For PR But Has Pitfalls, Huffington Post, June 19, 2014. Retrieved March 28, 2015.
  29. ^ University of British Columbia, Fighting Crime One Tweet at a Time, June 18, 2014. Retrieved March 28, 2015.
  30. ^ Arielle Pardes, The Evolution of the Bitch, Vice, September 9, 2014. Retrieved March 28, 2015.
  31. ^ Cathy Gulli, Help! My Office is Ringtone Hell, Macleans Magazine, January 21, 2009. Retrieved March 28, 2015.
  32. ^ Marsha Lederman, Is Chavril Our Own Brangelina Pairing? Globe and Mail, August 23, 2012. Retrieved March 28, 2015.
  33. ^ Canadian Criminal Justice Association, 2017 Award Recipients.
  34. ^ Research earns BU professor international award, September 30, 2016
  35. ^ Confederation of University Faculty Associations of British Columbia, 2013 Award Recipients.
  36. ^ University of British Columbia, A-Ha Moments, Teaching Awards and News, 2010-2011
  37. ^ University of British Columbia, Public Education Award Recipients
  38. ^ American Society of Criminology, Division of Critical Criminology Award Recipients.

External links[edit]