Christopher Rose (judge)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The Right Honourable
Sir Christopher Rose
Personal details
Nationality British

Sir Christopher Rose (born 10 February 1937) is a former judge on the Court of Appeal of England and Wales[1] and a member of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom. He became Vice-President of the Criminal Division of the Court of Appeal. On 24 April 2006 he retired and the bench was soon after was appointed Chief Surveillance Commissioner, a post which he held until 2015.

During his time on the Court of Appeal he was an outspoken critic of recent legislation, in particular the Criminal Justice Act 2003 and the Sexual Offences Act 2003, which he criticised as being poorly drafted, saying: "If a history of criminal legislation ever comes to be written it is unlikely that 2003 will be identified as a year of exemplary skill in the annals of Parliamentary drafting."[2]

In 1957 he obtained a degree in law from the University of Leeds. He went on to do his BCL at Wadham College, Oxford, where he has acted as an Honorary Fellow since 1993.

In 2009 he said the Civil Nuclear Constabularies "approach to covert activity is conspicuously professional'. He found that the system for storing the intelligence gained from informers was 'working well' and that 'senior officers regard covert surveillance as a long-term requirement".[3]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hughes, Mark (6 December 2011). "Deceived lovers speak of mental 'torture' from undercover detectives". London: The Independent. Retrieved 17 March 2014. 
  2. ^ R v C, [2005] EWCA Crim 3533; (2006) 1 Cr App R 28; Times, 5 January 2006
  3. ^ Evans, Rob (20 October 2009). "Secret files reveal covert network run by nuclear police". The Guardian. London.