Christopher Shy

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Christopher Shy, who occasionally goes by the pen name "Ronin,"[1]: 374  is a freelance fantasy and science fiction artist.

Biography[edit]

Christopher Shy created Studio Ronin in 1994 to highlight his art.[1]: 374  with George Vasilakos, Shy conceived the zombie RPG All Flesh Must Be Eaten (2000).[1]: 341  In 2003, he joined forces with author Philip J. Reed to create the company Ronin Arts.[1]: 374  His work includes character portraits for White Wolf's Mage: the Ascension revised edition and Good Apollo, I'm Burning Star IV, Volume One: From Fear Through the Eyes of Madness, a graphic novel written by Claudio Sanchez. He is also the founder of Studio Ronin and the co-founder of Ronin Arts.[2] His graphic novel Pathfinder is an adaptation of the film of the same name.[3][4] He also provided the art for Ascend,[5] which also has a web version called Ascend: Divination.[6]

2007-2013[edit]

In 2007 Shy and Studio Ronin released Silent Leaves: The Last Bondsmen followed by Silent Leaves: Exceptions To Life, The first two installments of a four-part graphic novel series written and drawn by Shy.

In 2008 Shy was the conceptual designer for the remake of Friday The 13th directed by Marcus Nispel. This marks Shy's second film with the director, Pathfinder being the first.

In 2009, he illustrated the graphic novel versions of Call of Duty and Frost Road, both written and directed Keith Arem.[7][8] He also illustrated Soul Stealer with Michael Easton followed by Soul Stealer: Blood and Rain.

Shy was the artist of the Rise of the Warrior graphic novel for the 2013 PlayStation 3 video game, God of War: Ascension, which ran on GodofWar.com from October 22, 2012, to March 19, 2013.[9]

Reception[edit]

In a review of Ascend, Publishers Weekly opined that "Shy's artwork for this quasi-religious melodrama is state of the art and then some".[10] In its review of Pathfinder, Booklist wrote that "Shy's artwork adds a dreamlike quality to Kalogridis' telling, blurring the symbolism and tempering the violence by veiling the details in a dark, smoky palette."[11] His art for Pathfinder was described as "amazing" by critic Derrik Quenzer in The Oregonian.[12]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Ascend (with Keith Arem, Image Comics, 120 pages, paperback, ISBN 1-58240-430-5, hardcover, ISBN 1-60010-138-0, 2005, Special Edition, IDW Publishing, 200 pages, paperback, ISBN 1-60010-137-2, hardcover, ISBN 1-58240-518-2, 2008)[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Shannon Appelcline (2011). Designers & Dragons. Mongoose Publishing. ISBN 978-1-907702-58-7.
  2. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2011-01-17. Retrieved 2007-03-08.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: archived copy as title (link)
  3. ^ Knight, Chris (April 14, 2007). "Native-Viking clash entirely visceral", Times Colonist, p. D12.
  4. ^ McTavish, Brian (May 12, 2007). "Comic books bridging the gap: Graphic novels feeding film fans' interests", Calgary Herald, p. C8.
  5. ^ Ascend-ing with Christopher Shy Archived 2004-12-28 at the Wayback Machine, Newsarama, November 23, 2004
  6. ^ Metaphor.tv. "The Official Ascend™ Website". www.preparetoascend.com.
  7. ^ "'Call of Duty 2' Game Director Takes on 'Frost Road' Feature - Bloody Disgusting". www.bloody-disgusting.com. 2 December 2009.
  8. ^ Fernandez, Jay A. (December 1, 2009). "Keith Arem to direct 'Frost Road'", The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved December 17, 2014.
  9. ^ Miller, Greg (October 22, 2012). "Earn XP in God of War: Ascension Today". IGN. Ziff Davis Media. Archived from the original on January 18, 2013. Retrieved December 10, 2012.
  10. ^ (March 21, 2005). "Ascend", Publishers Weekly 252 (12): 38.
  11. ^ Coleman, Tina (November 1, 2006). "Pathfinder: An American Saga", Booklist 103 (5): 42.
  12. ^ Quenzer, Derrik (September 8, 2006). "Comi-X! Hollywood meets comic books", The Oregonian, p. 44.
  13. ^ Keith Arem on Ascend: Special Edition Archived 2010-01-07 at the Wayback Machine, Newsarama, November 21, 2007

External links[edit]