Chromium(III) sulfide

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Chromium(III) Sulfide
Identifiers
12018-22-3 YesY
EC Number 234-638-8
PubChem 159397
Properties
Cr2S3
Molar mass 200.19 g/mol
Appearance Brown to black powder
Odor odorless
Density 3.77 g/cm3
Melting point 1350 °C
insoluble
Hazards
Safety data sheet [1]
NFPA 704
Flammability code 0: Will not burn. E.g., water Health code 1: Exposure would cause irritation but only minor residual injury. E.g., turpentine Reactivity code 0: Normally stable, even under fire exposure conditions, and is not reactive with water. E.g., liquid nitrogen Special hazards (white): no codeNFPA 704 four-colored diamond
US health exposure limits (NIOSH):
PEL (Permissible)
TWA 1 mg/m3[1]
REL (Recommended)
TWA 0.5 mg/m3[1]
IDLH (Immediate danger)
250 mg/m3[1]
Related compounds
Other anions
Chromium(III) oxide
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Infobox references

Chromium(III) Sulfide is the sulfide salt of trivalent chromium.

Preparation[edit]

It may be formed by the reaction of hydrogen sulfide with chromium(III) oxide or other chromium salts.

Properties[edit]

Chromium(III) sulfide appears as a brownish black powder that melts at 1350 C. It is essentially insoluble in water.[2] When heated sufficiently, it will oxidize in the presence of air or oxygen, though it is otherwise fairly stable.

Health effects[edit]

Chromium (VI) is a confirmed carcinogen in humans. Because chromium(III) sulfide is fairly insoluble in water, it is much less toxic than other chromium compounds. However, in-vivo oxidation of chromium(III) to chromium(VI) can render it highly toxic and carcinogenic. As with all chromium-containing species, care must be taken to avoid ingestion of chromium(III) sulfide.

References[edit]