Chromolaena

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Chromolaena
Chromolaena odorata.jpg
Chromolaena odorata, considered a weed in many parts of the world
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Plantae
(unranked): Angiosperms
(unranked): Eudicots
(unranked): Asterids
Order: Asterales
Family: Asteraceae
Subfamily: Asteroideae
Tribe: Eupatorieae
Genus: Chromolaena
DC.[1]

Chromolaena is a genus of about 165 species of perennials and shrubs in the aster family, Asteraceae. The name is derived from the Greek words χρῶμα (chroma), meaning "color," and λαινα (laina), meaning "cloak." It refers to the colored phyllaries of some species.[2] Members of the genus are native to the Americas, from the southern United States to South America (especially Brazil).[2] One species, Chromolaena odorata, has been introduced to many parts of the world where it is considered a weed.[3]

The plants of this genus were earlier taxonomically classified under the genus Eupatorium, but are now considered to be more closely related to other genera in the tribe Eupatorieae.[4]

Selected species[5][6]


In Australia some species are called "triffid weed"[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Genus: Chromolaena DC.". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. 2011-01-06. Retrieved 2011-08-25. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Nesom, Guy L. "Chromolaena de Candolle in A. P. de Candolle and A. L. P. P. de Candolle, Prodr. 5: 133. 1836.". Flora of North America. eFloras.org. Retrieved 2011-08-25. 
  3. ^ "Chromolaena DC.". Digital Flora of Taiwan. eFloras.org. 
  4. ^ Schmidt, GJ; EE Schilling (May 2000). "Phylogeny and Biogeography of Eupatorium (Asteraceae: Eupatorieae) Based on Nuclear ITS Sequence". American Journal of Botany. Botanical Society of America. 87 (5): 716–726. doi:10.2307/2656858. JSTOR 2656858. PMID 10811796. 
  5. ^ "Chromolaena". Integrated Taxonomic Information System. Retrieved 2010-05-27. 
  6. ^ "GRIN Species Records of Chromolaena". Germplasm Resources Information Network. United States Department of Agriculture. Retrieved 2011-08-25. 
  7. ^ John K. Francis, Research Forester, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, International Institute of Tropical Forestry, Jardín Botánico Sur. "Chromolaena geraniifolia (Urban) King & H.E. Robins" (PDF). Wildland Shrubs of the United States and its Territories: Thamnic Descriptions, General Technical Report IITF-WB-1, Edited by John K. Francis. Retrieved 2008-08-24. 
  8. ^ http://www.weeds.org.au/docs/weednet6.pdf (page 6)

External links[edit]