Chronology of Provisional Irish Republican Army actions (1990–99)

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This is a chronology of activities by the Provisional Irish Republican Army (IRA), from 1990 to 1999. For actions before and after this period see Chronology of Provisional Irish Republican Army actions.

1990[edit]

January–February[edit]

  • 2 January 1990: Ulster loyalist militant Harry Dickey, a member of the Ulster Defence Association (UDA) and Ulster Democratic Party, was killed by a Provisional IRA booby trap bomb attached to his car outside his home, Larkfield Manor, Sydenham, East Belfast.[1][2]
  • 2 January 1990: an IRA unit threw a bomb at a Royal Ulster Constabulary (RUC) base on Stewartstown Road, Belfast.[3]
  • 3 January 1990: a British soldier was injured in an IRA car bomb attack in Magherafelt, County Londonderry.[3]
  • 9 January 1990: an Ulster Defence Regiment (UDR) soldier (Olven Kilpatrick) was shot dead by the IRA on Main Street, Castlederg, County Tyrone. In a follow-up operation, two RUC officers were injured by a bomb left by the IRA unit.[2][4]
  • 16 January 1990: an IRA bomb was defused at the Aldershot Garrison in Aldershot, England.[5]
  • 20 January 1990: the IRA carried out a mortar attack on the RUC/British Army base at Newtownhamilton, County Armagh.[6]
  • 22 January 1990: RUC Inspector Derek Monteith was shot dead by an IRA unit in Kilburn Park, Armagh town. Up to 30 rounds were fired through his kitchen door, hitting him five times in the head, neck and body.[4][7]
  • 28 January 1990: a civilian (Charles Love) was killed when he was hit by debris when an IRA bomb exploded on Derry's walls during a Bloody Sunday march. The security forces described his death as a "freak accident" as he was a quarter of a mile from the bomb, which was targeting security forces.[8] Love was a member of Republican Youth. He is commemorated at a Sinn Féin-organised march in his home town of Strabane each year.[9]
  • 11 February 1990: three British soldiers were injured when their Gazelle helicopter was forced out of the sky after being hit by machine-gun fire from an IRA unit near Clogher, County Tyrone.[10]
  • 20 February 1990: the IRA bombed a British military recruitment office in Leicester, England. Two people were injured.[5]
  • 20 February 1990: a van and a car driven by an IRA unit carrying light machine guns were spotted by a British Wessex helicopter near Newtownhamilton, South Armagh. The IRA unit split up in several vehicles, but one of the cars was pinpointed by the aircraft, and three IRA volunteers were arrested by a party of three soldiers and two RUC officers after landing from their helicopter in Silverbridge. Afterwards, a crowd of 40 civilians attacked the security forces, allowing the escape of the three IRA men. A number of automatic weapons were confiscated in the aftermath by the RUC, among them two light machine guns.[11]
  • 25 February 1990: the IRA bombed a British Army recruitment office in Halifax, West Yorkshire.[5]

March–April[edit]

  • 8 March 1990: an off-duty UDR soldier, Thomas Jamison, was shot dead by the IRA at Tullynure, near Donaghmore, County Tyrone. He was driving a lorry for a building firm which was contracted to the British Army. A three-man IRA unit attacked the lorry with a grenade and fired over 30 shots into the cab.[4][12]
  • 16 March 1990: the First use of the Barret M82 sniper rifle in Northern Ireland by the South Armagh sniper teams. A British soldier suffered minor head injures when a bullet pierced his helmet on Сastleblaney Road, County Armagh.[13][14]
  • 24 March 1990: a gun battle erupted between an IRA unit and undercover British forces at Cappagh, County Tyrone, when a civilian-type vehicle driven by an undercover agent was fired on by IRA volunteers without warning, according to Archie Hamilton, then Secretary of State for Defence. Hamilton stated that there were no casualties.[15]
  • 25 March 1990: a 1,000 lb IRA van bomb exploded in front of the RUC base in Ballymena, County Antrim. Another RUC base was bombed in County Tyrone.[16]
  • 28 March 1990: an off-duty RUC officer (George Starrett) was shot dead by an IRA unit at his home on Newry Road, Armagh town, when a burst of shots were fired through his kitchen window.[17][18]
  • 2 April 1990: an IRA bomb was defused by a controlled explosion outside Fort George British Army base in Derry.[19]
  • 9 April 1990: 4 UDR soldiers (Michael Adams, John Birch, John Bradley, Steven Smart) were killed when the IRA detonated a landmine under their patrol vehicle on Ballydugan Road, Downpatrick, County Down. The landmine contained over 1,000 lb (450 kg) of explosive and was so powerful that the vehicle was blown into a nearby field.[4][20]
  • 16 April 1990: the IRA shot dead Irish People's Liberation Organisation (IPLO) volunteer Eoin Morley in Newry. He was dragged from his girlfriend's house and shot twice in the back. The IRA initially claimed he was an informer but later apologised for the killing, claiming they had received false information.[21]
  • 27 April 1990: a British Army contractor (Kenneth Graham), was killed by the IRA when he triggered a booby-trap bomb attached to his car in Kilkeel, County Down.[4][22]
  • 28 April 1990: several mortar shells were fired by the IRA at a military checkpoint in Strabane, County Tyrone.[23]
  • 28 April 1990: a British soldier was shot and wounded in the leg when his patrol was ambushed by an IRA unit firing a heavy machine gun near Cullyhanna, County Armagh.[6]

May–June[edit]

  • 2 May 1990: a bomb exploded under a landrover in Lisburn Territorial Army base, injuring a civilian employee. An RUC base in Derry was hit by a mortar, although no injuries were reported.[24]
  • 6 May 1990: a British soldier was shot dead when an IRA unit launched an attack on a British Army foot patrol near Cullyhanna, County Armagh. The patrol had become suspicious of a derelict building after seeing smoke coming from the chimney on a hot day. As they approached they came under heavy machine gun fire and one soldier was shot in the head. Lance Sergeant Graham Stewart died of his wounds the following day. The patrol was airlifted to safety (see Operation Conservation).[4][25]
  • 16 May 1990: the IRA detonated a bomb under a military minubus in London, killing Sgt Charles Chapman, and injuring four other soldiers.[4][26]
  • 27 May 1990: Two Australian tourists, Nick Spanos and Stephen Melrose, were shot dead in the Netherlands, having been mistaken for off-duty British soldiers from a base across the German border.[4] The IRA said it "deeply regretted the tragedy".[25]
  • 1 June 1990: a British soldier (Robert Davies) was killed and two others wounded when they were shot at close range by an IRA unit while waiting for a train at Lichfield railway station in Staffordshire, England.[4][27]
  • 1 June 1990: a British Royal Artillery officer, Michael Dillon-Lee, was shot dead by the IRA in Dortmund, West Germany. He was one of the most senior soldiers killed in the conflict – holding the rank of Major. In a subsequent car chase a West German police officer was injured when the IRA unit fired on the pursuing officers.[4][28]
  • 6 June 1990: a retired RUC officer and his wife (James and Ellen Sefton) were killed when an IRA booby trap bomb exploded underneath their car on the Ballygomartin Road in Belfast. A civilian was slightly injured when the car struck her.[29]
  • 9 June 1990: the IRA bombed the headquarters of the British Army's Honourable Artillery Company in central London. Nineteen people at the barracks were injured.[5]
  • 14 June 1990: a large IRA bomb badly damaged a building inside a British Army base at Hanover, West Germany.[30]
  • 25 June 1990: a bomb exploded at the Carlton Club in London, injuring 20 people. Lord Kaberry died of his injuries on 13 March 1991.[26]
  • 28 June 1990: a British soldier was wounded when the IRA opened fire on a military patrol in the main street of Pomeroy, County Tyrone.[31]
  • 30 June 1990: the IRA shot dead two RUC officers (John Beckett and Gary Meyer) in an ambush on Castle Street, Belfast.[4][32]

July–August[edit]

  • 2 July 1990: an IRA rocket injured ten people at a Belfast RUC base.[33]
  • 20 July 1990: an IRA bomb exploded inside the London Stock Exchange after an IRA telephone warning; it blew a hole in the side of the building, but there were no injuries.[34]
  • 24 July 1990: three RUC officers (Joshua Willis, William Hanson, and David Sterritt) as well as one civilian, were killed when an IRA unit ambushed a joint RUC and British Army patrol on Killylea Road in Armagh town.[4] The patrol car was hit by a landmine, which blew it off the road and into a hedge. The IRA and Martin McGuinness (on behalf of Sinn Féin) apologised for the death of the civilian, a Roman Catholic nun, Sister Catherine Dunne, a native of Dublin.[35]
  • 26 July 1990: the IRA shot dead bomb-maker Patrick Gerard "Paddy" Flood after discovering he was an RUC informer, following a series of botched bomb attacks and the capture of a number of IRA men in Derry.[36] His body was found near Newtownhamilton, County Armagh.[37]
  • 30 July 1990: Ian Gow, Conservative MP for Eastbourne, was assassinated by the IRA when a booby trap bomb exploded under his car at his home in East Sussex, England. The IRA claimed the killing was due to his role in British policy decisions in Northern Ireland.[4][38]
  • 13 August 1990: the IRA planted a bomb at the Berkshire home of British Army General Sir Anthony Farrar-Hockley. The device was defused.[39]
  • 18 August 1990: a builder (Andrew Bogle) was killed by a booby-trap bomb on a building site in Castlederg, County Tyrone. The IRA said it carried out the attack because the building firm worked for the security forces.[40]

September–October[edit]

  • 4 September 1990: the IRA tested a new type of bomb in County Fermanagh. An 8,000 lb (3,600 kg) bomb was loaded onto an unmanned tractor and trailer near Rosslea and driven by remote control towards a British Army outpost. The attack failed when the massive bomb caused the tractor to overturn but the remotely delivered bomb would later be used in successful attacks on British Army installations in County Armagh, such as the attack on Cloghoge checkpoint.[41]
  • 5 September 1990: several RUC officers were injured when the IRA detonated a van bomb at Loughgall RUC base in County Armagh. A local church and a school were also damaged.[42][43]
  • 6 September 1990: the IRA planted two bombs inside the Royal Navy's Royal Fleet Auxiliary ship the RFA Fort Victoria (A387). One of the bombs was defused, but the other bomb went off. The blast caused extensive damage to the engine room, resulting in severe flooding.
  • 10 September 1990: the IRA bombed a British Army and Navy recruiting office in Derby, England.[5]
  • 15 September 1990: an RUC detective (Louis Robinson) was kidnapped and later shot dead by the IRA in County Armagh. A minibus in which he and five prison officers were travelling was stopped at an IRA checkpoint in Killeen, County Armagh. Three prison officers managed to escape, but the RUC detective and two prison officers were bundled into the back of waiting cars. The two prison officers were released,[citation needed][why?] but Robinson was shot in the back of the head and his body dumped near Belleeks. His body was found by the side of Concession Road, Cullaville, three days later.[4][44]
  • 17 September 1990: a British Army sergeant was shot and injured by the IRA outside an army recruiting office in Finchley, London.[5]
  • 18 September 1990: the IRA attempted to kill Air Chief Marshal Sir Peter Terry at his Staffordshire home. Terry had been a prime target since his days as Governor of Gibraltar, in which capacity he signed the documents allowing the SAS to operate against IRA volunteers in 1988. The revenge attack took place at 9 pm at the Main Road house. The gunman opened fire through a window, hitting him at least nine times and injuring his wife, Lady Betty, near the eye. The couple's daughter, Elizabeth, was found suffering from shock. Peter Terry's face had to be rebuilt as the shots shattered his face, and two high-velocity bullets lodged a fraction of an inch from his brain.[26][45]
  • 20 September 1990: a British soldier was hit and wounded during a heavy machine gun attack on an army patrol at Drumalt, South Armagh.[6]
  • 23 September 1990: an off-duty UDR soldier (Colin McCullough) was shot dead by the IRA at Oxford Island, Lough Neagh, County Armagh. He was sitting in his car with his girlfriend when he was shot 13 times.[4][46]
  • 26 September 1990: a British Army helicopter was fired upon while landing at Newtownhamilton British Army base, County Armagh. One soldier was wounded.[6] On 6 October, a Catholic, Denis Carville, in a car with his girlfriend, was shot dead in retaliation for the murder of McCullough.[4]
  • 27 September 1990: an IRA bomb was defused at the Royal Over-Seas League building in central London.[47]
  • 9 October 1990: IRA volunteers Martin McCaughey and Dessie Grew were killed by the SAS near Loughgall, County Armagh.[4][48][49]
  • 13 October 1990: the IRA attacked an RUC/British Army patrol at a security barrier in Belfast. A lone IRA volunteer armed with a Browning Hi-Power pistol approached an RUC vehicle at the barrier and fired a number of shots through the window. This pistol had been captured from Michael Stone during his attack on a funeral two years earlier. Two RUC officers were wounded. One of these (Samuel Todd) died of his wounds two days later.[4][50]
  • 20 October 1990: a former UDR soldier (David Pollock) was shot dead by the IRA in Strabane. An IRA unit rammed his car on the Melmount Road. Three IRA volunteers then left their car and began shooting into the man's car with rifles and handguns.[51]
  • 23 October 1990: a UVF member (William Aitken) was shot dead by the IRA on the Falls Road, Belfast. Two men approached his car on either side. As one distracted him from the passenger side another leaned through the window and shot him in the head. The IRA initially claimed he was a UFF member although it later emerged he was a member of the UVF.[4][52]
  • 24 October 1990: in a proxy bomb attack, the IRA forced a British Army civilian employee (Patrick Gillespie), by holding his family hostage, to deliver a bomb to a British Army checkpoint at Buncrana Road, Coshquin, County Londonderry (on the County Donegal border). The bomb detonated, killing Gillespie and six British soldiers. As the bomb exploded an IRA unit opened fire from across the border. Over 25 houses in a neaby estate were damaged by the bomb.[4][53][54][55]
  • 24 October 1990: an attempted IRA proxy-bomb attack against a British Army base in Omagh failed when the bomb did not fully explode.[56]

November–December[edit]

  • 2 November 1990: Albert Cooper, a UDR soldier, was killed by the IRA when he triggered a booby trap bomb attached to a car in Cookstown, County Tyrone. An IRA volunteer (Geraldine Ferrity) had left a car rigged with explosives in his Cookstown garage and asked him to work on it. When he put the car in gear it exploded.[4][57]
  • 10 November 1990: two RUC officers (David Murphy and Thomas Taylor) and two civilians (Keith Dowey and Norman Kendall) were shot dead by the IRA while they were out shooting wildfowl at Castor Bay, near Morrows Point, Lough Neagh, County Armagh.[4][58]
  • 1 December 1990: a former UDR soldier (Hubert Gilmore) was shot dead by the IRA in Derry. The IRA's Derry Brigade said he was killed because he worked for a building firm which was contracted to the British Army and not because he was a former British soldier. His wife was injured in the shooting, the IRA described her injury as "regrettable".[59]
  • 3 December 1990: David Shiels, a Protestant civilian, was shot dead at his mobile home on Crew Road, Maghera, County Londonderry. The IRA admitted responsibility and said it believed the man was member of the security forces. It later "profoundly apologised" and said that its volunteers had been acting on "erroneous information".[59]
  • 5 December 1990: an IRA bomb caused serious damage on the Belfast-Dublin railway near Jonesborough, County Armagh.[60]
  • 20 December 1990: a RUC Reserve Constable (Wilfred Wethers) was shot dead by an IRA sniper in Waringstown, County Down. The officer was shot eight times by a sniper who was waiting in a nearby field. As the officer approached in his car the gunman opened fire.[4][59]
  • 26 December 1990: an RUC patrol manning a checkpoint exchanged fire with an IRA unit at Annaghmartin, County Fermanagh.[61]

1991[edit]

January–February[edit]

  • 1 January 1991: a gunfight erupted between an IRA unit and British soldiers at a border Army checkpoint at Aughnacloy, County Tyrone.[62]
  • 5 January 1991: a factory and six shops in Belfast were destroyed by incendiary devices planted by the IRA.[63]
  • 8 January 1991: an IRA culvert bomb injured three soldiers and a civilian and caused extensive damage to nearby houses on Dundalk Road, Newtownhamilton, County Armagh.[64]
  • 21 January 1991: a former RUC officer (Cullen Stephenson) was shot dead by the IRA in Brookeborough, County Fermanagh.[65]
  • 24 January 1991: an IRA unit threw an explosive device at a British Army base in Staffordshire, England. At least one shot was also fired.[47]
  • 30 January 1991: after an IRA car bomb attack, a dairy firm in Armagh town agreed not to supply the British Army or the RUC.[66]
  • 3 February 1991: the IRA launched another "proxy bomb" attack on a British Army Ulster Defense Regiment base in Magherafelt, County Londonderry. The estimated 500 lbs of explosives blew up outside the UDR barracks and caused structural damage to buildings within a quarter of a mile radius. A young woman was held hostage while her husband, employed by a construction firm that did contract work for the security forces, was forced to drive the vehicle with the bomb. The driver escaped and there were no serious injuries in the blast.[67]
  • 7 February 1991: the IRA launched a mortar attack on members of the British Cabinet and the Prime Minister, John Major in a Cabinet session at Number 10 Downing Street at the height of a huge security clampdown amid the Gulf War. The mortar missed any buildings, landing in a garden.[68]
  • 14 February 1991: a UDR soldier was seriously wounded when a Saint Valentine's Day card bomb which he had received exploded in Killen.[69]
  • 15 February 1991: the IRA attempted to shoot down a British RAF helicopter that was extracting men from the Duke of Edinburgh's Royal Regiment after a border patrol from St Angelo Barracks, Trory, County Fermanagh. More than 360 rounds were fired from across the border.[70]
  • 18 February 1991: a bomb exploded at Victoria Station, one man (David Corner), was killed and 38 people injured. A bomb also exploded at Paddington Station delaying upwards of 500,000 commuters, but there were no injuries.[26][71] Police confirmed that the IRA had given a 45-minute advance warning.[72]
  • 24 February 1991: an IRA unit launched a mortar and machine gun assault on a British Army outpost in Silverbridge, County Armagh. A 15-minute gun battle erupted right after the first attack.[73]

March–April[edit]

  • 1 March 1991: two UDR soldiers were killed in an IRA ambush on Killylea Road in Armagh town. One soldier, an Englishman (Paul Sutcliffe) died instantly; the other soldier (Roger Love) died three days later, on 4 March. This was the first recorded use by the IRA of a Mark-12 horizontal-mortar bomb (see Mullacreevie ambush).[74][75]
  • 2 March 1991: the IRA carried out a machine gun attack on a helicopter. The shooting was filmed by a Dublin television crew outside Crossmaglen Health Center, County Armagh.[76][77]
  • 3 March 1991: three IRA volunteers (John Quinn, Dwayne O'Donnell, and Malcolm Nugent), along with a Catholic civilian (Thomas Armstrong), were killed by the Ulster Volunteer Force (UVF) during a gun attack on Boyle's Bar in Cappagh, County Tyrone. The volunteers arrived in a car as a UVF gang was about to attack the pub. The UVF fired at the car (killing the volunteers) then fired through the window of the pub (killing the civilian).[78][79]
  • 13 March 1991: a British Army checkpoint at Gortmullan, County Fermanagh, was fired on by the IRA. There was another attack on the same spot on 20 April.[80]
  • 20 March 1991: an employee of Locksley Engineering was shot in the arm by IRA members in Belfast, as part of its campaign against companies which supplied security forces. After the shooting, Locksley Engineering announced that they would no longer work for the RUC or the British Army in Northern Ireland.[81]
  • 22 March 1991: a female RUC civilian employee, Mrs Margaret Grant, a mother of three, was shot and seriously wounded by IRA members outside the RUC headquarters in Derry. Her husband, an RUC officer, had been killed by the IRA in 1987, and the attack stirred widespread condemnation.[81]
  • 23 March 1991: a UDR soldier was shot and wounded by the IRA in Trillick, County Tyrone.[81]
  • 25 March 1991: a rocket attack on an RUC mobile patrol in Newry, County Down, injured two RUC officers.[81]
  • 5 April 1991: a number of incendiary devices were planted by the IRA in the Arndale Shopping Centre, Manchester, England. They were discovered and defused.[47]
  • 6 April 1991: an off-duty RUC officer (Spence McGarry) was killed when he triggered a booby-trap bomb attached to his car by the IRA in Ballycastle, County Antrim. The explosion caused the car to burst into flames and roll down a hill where it hit another vehicle which also burst into flames.[75][82]
  • 9 April 1991: a Protestant civilian, Derek Ferguson, a builder, was shot dead by the IRA at his mobile home on Aughaveagh Road, Coagh, County Tyrone. Ferguson was a cousin of a prominent Unionist politician, Rev William McCrea.[83]
  • 10 April 1991: an IRA volunteer (Colm Marks) was shot dead by the RUC while he was preparing a mortar bomb in Downpatrick, County Down. Another IRA volunteer escaped.[75]
  • 13 April 1991: the IRA shot dead Ian Sproule outside his parents' home, Liskleen Road, Killen, Castlederg, County Tyrone. The dead man had reportedly been listed as a UVF member in Garda Síochána files that the IRA had obtained; the documents reportedly indicated that Sproule was wanted in connection with firebomb attacks on premises in Ballybofey, Letterkenny and Castlefin in 1987. The attacks had been claimed by the UFF. CAIN lists Sproule as a civilian.[84]
  • 13 April 1991: an off-duty RUC officer (Samuel McCrum) was shot dead by the IRA at his wife's shop, Antrim Street, Lisburn, County Antrim.[75][84]
  • 20 April 1991: the British Army checkpoint at Gortmullan, County Fermanagh, was fired on by the IRA for the second time in a month.[80] Members of the Duke of Edinburgh's Royal Regiment returned fire with a .50 heavy machine gun, the first time such a weapon was known to have been used by the British Army in the Troubles.[70]
  • 28 April 1991: the IRA fired a Mark-12 mortar at the RUC base in Carrickmore, County Tyrone.[85]

May–June[edit]

  • 1 May 1991: a RUC patrol vehicle was hit by an IRA rocket on Mica Drive, Beechmount, Belfast. Three officers were badly injured. Sergeant Stephen Gillespie died two days later.[75][86]
  • 13 May 1991: a former RUC officer (Robert Orr) was killed when an IRA booby-trap bomb exploded underneath his car as he drove along The Mall in Armagh town.[87]
  • 17 May 1991: an RUC officer (Douglas Carruthers) was killed by a booby trap bomb attached to his car while driving near his home, Mullybritt, Lisbellaw, County Fermanagh.[75][88]
  • 21 May 1991: Wallace McVeigh was shot dead by the IRA at his workplace, Balmoral Market, Boucher Road, Belfast. The victim owned a fruit and vegetable firm and had been supplying the security forces. He had been warned previously to cease supplying them.[88]
  • 25 May 1991: a British soldier (Terence O'Neill) was killed when the IRA fired a grenade into North Howard Street British Army Base, West Belfast, from an adjoining derelict building. Another soldier lost both of his legs in the attack.[75][89] The IRA claimed that they used a new type of grenade.[90]
  • 26 May 1991: two RUC officers were injured when an IRA bomb exploded in a Protestant housing area at Cookstown, County Tyrone; 130 houses were damaged.[91]
  • 27 May 1991: a RUC officer was shot dead in an IRA ambush in Lower Crescent, Belfast. IRA volunteers ambushed the patrol at close range with handguns. The dead RUC officer was shot 5 times. A nearby UDR patrol returned fire but the IRA unit escaped.[75][89]
  • 31 May 1991: Glenanne barracks bombing: Three UDR soldiers (Paul Blakely, Robert Crozier, and Sydney Hamilton) were killed, and as many as 40 others injured to varying degrees, after the IRA detonated a lorry-bomb packed with 2,500 lb (1,100 kg) of explosives outside Glenanne British Army Base near Mount Norris, County Armagh. A 60-metre-deep crater was left by the blast, and most of the livestock in surrounding farms were killed.[75][92]
  • 2 June 1991: a female civil servant (Celia Gourley) was injured outside her home in County Antrim by a booby-trap planted under her car. Her legs were blown off and later replaced with prosthetics. The IRA later called the attack "a mistake".[93]
  • 3 June 1991: three IRA volunteers (Lawrence McNally, Michael "Pete" Ryan, and Tony Doris) were killed in an ambush by an SAS unit at Coagh, County Tyrone. The British Army stated that the IRA volunteers had been intercepted on their way to an attack. More than 200 rounds were fired at the car.[94][95]
  • 17 June 1991: a UDR soldier (Brian Lawrence) was shot dead by the IRA at his workplace, a tyre depot, Duncrue Street, Belfast. An IRA unit ambushed his car using an AKM rifle and a .357 Magnum handgun. He was shot 7 times in the neck and body.[75][96]
  • 19 June 1991: a British soldier (Anthony Harrison) was shot dead by the IRA while off-duty at his girlfriend's home, Nevis Avenue, Strandtown, Belfast. Martin McGartland (an informant later shot and badly wounded by the IRA) alleged that he drove the getaway car.[75][97]
  • 26 June 1991: two bombs exploded outside the Queen Street RUC station in Belfast, injuring 20 people. Two suspected IRA members were arrested in the aftermath.[98]
  • 28 June 1991: an IRA bomb was defused at a theatre in Middlesex, England.[47]
  • 29 June 1991: Ulster Democratic Party member and UDA/UFF commander Cecil McKnight was shot dead by the IRA in the Waterside area of Derry City. The IRA claimed he had been involved in the assassination of Sinn Féin Councillor Eddie Fullerton. The IRA unit were pursued by the RUC after the shooting but escaped after they opened fire on an RUC patrol car.[75][97]

July–August[edit]

  • 19 July 1991: the IRA fired a surface-to-air missile at a RAF Wessex helicopter at Kinawley in County Fermanagh. The missile failed to lock onto the helicopter and exploded on the ground.[99]
  • 21 July 1991: the IRA shot dead a County Louth farmer (Thomas Oliver) whom they claimed was an informer for the Garda Síochána in Dundalk.[100]
  • 5 August 1991: a former UDR soldier, Eric Boyd, was shot dead by the IRA shortly after leaving his workplace, while driving along Altmore Road, Cappagh, County Tyrone.[75] The IRA claimed he was a member of the UVF.[101]
  • 8 August 1991: an informant (Martin McGartland) was kidnapped by the IRA in Belfast. He was being interrogated in a flat when he managed to escape by jumping out of a third floor window.[102]
  • 9 August 1991: Ulster Democratic Party member and UDA/UFF member Gary Lynch was shot dead by the IRA in Lisahally, County Londonderry. Lynch had been a pall bearer at the funeral of senior UDP and UDA/UFF member Cecil McKnight who was shot dead by the IRA two months earlier.[75][103]
  • 15 August 1991: a Catholic civilian (James Woods) was killed and a number of British soldiers wounded when the IRA launched a grenade attack at a British Army foot patrol, off Gortfin Street, Falls, Belfast.[75]
  • 15 August 1991: a former UDR soldier (Ronald Finlay) was shot dead by the IRA at his workplace, a farm at Brocklass Road, Sion Mills, County Tyrone.[75]
  • 17 August 1991: a British soldier (Simon Ware) was killed when the IRA detonated a 300 lb (140 kg) landmine as a British Army Patrol passed near Carrickrovaddy, Cullyhanna, County Armagh.[75][104]
  • 22 August 1991: the IRA carried out a bombing against the RUC base at Kilrea, County Londonderry using a 200 lb device.[105]
  • 28 August 1991: a 1,000 lb explosive device planted by the IRA in Markethill, County Armagh, destroyed an RUC base and damaged in different degree all the buildings of the village, some of them beyond repair. A great deal of livestock was killed.[106]
  • 29 August 1991: three IRA incendiary devices were defused in a London underground depot near Hammersmith.[47]

September–October[edit]

  • 3 September 1991: an attempted proxy-bombing in County Armagh failed when the truck slid off the road into a ditch.[92]
  • 10 September 1991: a UVF member (John Hanna) was shot dead by the IRA in South Belfast. A two-man IRA unit entered the house and the victim jumped from his bedroom window to escape but the IRA shot him from the window. One of the members then ran downstairs and shot Hanna again as he lay wounded; in total he was shot eight times. The suggestion that he was a UVF member was denied by his family although the man had a tattoo with the letters "UVF" on his arm and a number of UVF emblems in his bedroom.[75][107]
  • 17 September 1991: an RUC officer (Erik Clarke) was killed and several British soldiers wounded when the IRA carried out a horizontal mortar attack against a joint patrol in Swatragh, County Londonderry.[75][108]
  • 19 September 1991: a British Army contractor (John Haldane) was shot dead at his workplace in Duncrue, Belfast. A two-man IRA team, who were not wearing any masks, walked into his office and shot him twice in the chest and once in the head.[75][109]
  • 14 October 1991: a ten-minute gun battle erupted between British soldiers and IRA volunteers at Derryvollen, County Fermanagh.[110]

November–December[edit]

  • 2 November 1991: two British soldiers (Philip Cross and Craig Pantry) were killed when the IRA detonated a bomb at Musgrave Park British Army base in Belfast. A two storey building in the base was destroyed by the blast.[75][111]
  • 6 November 1991: the IRA fired a horizontal mortar at a four-vehicle UDR patrol in Bellaghy, County Londonderry. The mortar hit the last vehicle in the patrol, killing a UDR soldier, Michael Boxall, and wounding another.[75][112]
  • 13 November 1991: the IRA shot dead a UDA member (William Kingsberry) and a Red Hand Commando (Samuel Mehaffey) at their home on Lecale Street, Belfast. Two IRA volunteers armed with an AK-47 assault rifle and a 9mm pistol opened fire, hitting the UDA man at least nine times and the other man six times. In a separate attack, two Protestant civilians, Kenneth Lynn and Stephen Lynn, were killed while renovating a house on Upper Crumlin Road, Belfast, when the IRA attacked their home. The building was previously owned by a UVF member and it is suspected he was the intended target.[75][113]
  • 15 November 1991: IRA volunteers Patricia Black and Frank Ryan were killed in St Albans, Hertfordshire, when their bomb detonated prematurely. A civilian was also injured.[26][114]
  • 24 November 1991: a UVF member (Colin Caldwell), and a UDA member (Robert Skey), were killed and eight others injured when the IRA managed to plant a bomb in a dining hall used by loyalist prisoners in Crumlin Road Prison, Belfast.[75][115]
  • 27 November 1991: a UDR soldier (Kenneth Newell) was kidnapped and shot dead by the IRA while off-duty in Crossmaglen, County Armagh.[75][116]
  • 1 December 1991: four IRA devices exploded in separate retail premises on the Tottenham Court Road, London; there were no injuries.[47]
  • 2 December 1991: an IRA incendiary device ignited in a Littlewoods store on Oxford Street, London.[47]
  • 4 December 1991: a car bomb in Belfast caused widespread destruction on the Grand Opera House and left 16 people injured.[117]
  • 7 December 1991: a large number of explosive devices were found in shops and businesses in Blackpool, England.[47]
  • 8 December 1991: seven incendiary devices exploded in the Manchester Arndale in England. There were no injuries.[118]
  • 12 December 1991: an IRA truck-bomb wrecked the RUC station in Craigavon, County Armagh, injuring more than 60 people.[119] Another IRA device exploded on the grounds of a vacated Territorial Army base near Derry.[120]
  • 14 December 1991: four IRA explosive devices were discovered in Brent Cross Shopping Centre, London.[118]
  • 15 December 1991: an IRA incendiary device partially exploded in the National Gallery in London.[118]
  • 16 December 1991: the IRA detonated a bomb on a railway line near Clapham Junction in England.[118]
  • 23 December 1991: three IRA firebombs exploded at separate underground railway stations in London. There were no injuries although an estimated 50,000 commuters were affected and the cost was reportedly around $90 million.[118][121]

1992[edit]

A Sniper at work sign, near Crossmaglen, warns British troops of the presence of the South Armagh Sniper.

January–February[edit]

  • 1 January 1992: a gun battle occurs between British troops and an IRA unit at Pomeroy, County Tyrone.[122]
  • 13 January 1992: an IRA booby-trap bomb killed a Catholic civilian, Michael Logue, in Coalisland, County Tyrone. The bomb had been attached to his car by a magnet. It was a case of mistaken identity; the IRA had received information that he was working as a labourer on a British Army barracks (he was a joiner by trade), but this turned out to be untrue. The IRA apologised to his family.[123]
  • 17 January 1992: an IRA landmine blew up a minibus at Teebane near Cookstown, County Tyrone. It killed eight men who were working as building contractors for the British Army in Omagh; six other contractors were badly injured. One of the dead was also a soldier in the Royal Irish Rangers.[124][125][126]
  • 27 January 1992: a civilian was injured when an IRA bomb exploded at the bottom of Rockdale Street in Belfast.[127]
  • 30 January 1992: an IRA firebomb was defused at Elephant and Castle, London.[118]
  • 31 January 1992: an IRA van bomb blew up in downtown Dungannon, County Tyrone, injuring three people and causing substantial damages[128] both to the city center and the security base.[129]
  • 2 February 1992: the IRA detonated a car bomb on Botanic Avenue, Belfast. The explosion caused widespread damage.[130]
  • 3 February 1992: a civilian (Gordon Hamill) was shot dead by the IRA in Dungannon, County Tyrone. Two men followed him to a supermarket and opened fire with AK-47 assault rifles, hitting him 32 times. The IRA claimed the man was a member of the UVF. Hamill remains listed as a civilian at the CAIN database.[131]
  • 5 February 1992: Joseph MacManus, an IRA volunteer from Sligo Town, County Sligo, was killed near the border at Mulleek, near Belleek, County Fermanagh, during a gun battle following the attempted ambush of a UDR soldier, Corporal Eric Glass, who was wounded in the attack. Glass was later awarded the Queen's Gallantry Medal as well as the Distinguished Conduct Medal.[124][132]
  • 11 February 1992: an IRA bomb was defused on Parliament Street, Exeter.[118]
  • 15 February 1992: the IRA detonated a 450 lb (200 kg) bomb on Adelaide Street, Belfast. The bomb caused millions of pounds worth of damage.[130]
  • 16 February 1992: IRA volunteers Kevin Barry O'Donnell, Sean O'Farrell, Peter Clancy, and Daniel Patrick Vincent were ambushed and killed by the SAS in Clonoe, County Tyrone. The IRA unit had just attacked Coalisland RUC base using a DShK heavy machine gun mounted on the back of a stolen lorry. The men were ambushed in a graveyard following the attack by undercover British soldiers. Two other IRA volunteers were wounded during the ambush but managed to escape.[124][133] A British soldier was also injured during the incident.[134]
  • 28 February 1992: the IRA detonated a bomb at London Bridge railway station injuring 29 people.[26]
  • 29 February 1992: an IRA bomb exploded at the Crown Prosecution Service building in London injuring two people.[135]

March–April[edit]

  • 1 March 1992: a small IRA bomb was defused at White Hart Lane BR station in London.[118]
  • 5 March 1992: a 1,000 lb IRA bomb exploded in the center of Lurgan, County Armagh, causing extensive damage to commercial properties.[136]
  • 5 March 1992: a British soldier was injured by an IRA bomb near Augher, County Tyrone.[137][138]
  • 9 March 1992: the IRA destroyed a service station on the Ballygawley/Dungannon road, County Tyrone, on the basis that they were supplying British forces.[139][140]
  • 10 March 1992: a small IRA bomb exploded near Wandsworth Common railway station in London; there were no injuries.[118]
  • 15 March 1992: an IRA unit fired more than 1,000 rounds at two helicopters from across the border near Rosslea, County Fermanagh.[141]
  • 24 March 1992: the IRA detonated a massive car-bomb containing over 1,100 lb (500 kg) of explosive in Pakenham Street, Belfast. The bomb caused severe damage to the RUC base and nearby business premises[142]
  • 27 March 1992: a female RUC officer, Colleen McMurray, was killed when an IRA unit hit her patrol vehicle with a horizontal mortar in Newry, County Down. A fellow constable lost both his legs in the attack.[124][143]
  • 6 April 1992: a small IRA bomb exploded near Piccadilly Circus in London. There were no injuries.[118]
  • 10 April 1992: the IRA detonated a large truck-bomb at 30 St Mary Axe in the City of London. Despite a warning to evacuate the area, three civilians (Paul Butt, Danielle Carter, and Thomas Casey) were killed and 91 injured. Many buildings were heavily damaged, including the Baltic Exchange.[26][144]
  • 11 April 1992: a large IRA car-bomb exploded at Staples Corner in London causing serious damage to buildings and nearby roads.[145]
  • 11 April 1992: an IRA bomb partially exploded in a shop in Pomeroy, County Tyrone.[146]
  • 13 April 1992: a 500 lb (230 kg) IRA car-bomb was defused outside Castlereagh RUC base.[130]
  • 18 April 1992: Brendan McWilliams, an employee of the British Army, was shot dead by the IRA at his home, Nialls Crescent, off Killylea Road, Armagh. At least 18 shots were fired at him through the front door from a high velocity weapon.[147]

May–June[edit]

  • 1 May 1992: a British soldier (Andrew Grundy) was killed when the IRA used a specially designed unmanned railway bogie [clarification needed] to deliver a bomb to a British Army permanent vehicle checkpoint at Cloghoge, County Armagh (see Attack on Cloghoge checkpoint).[124]
  • 5 May 1992: a Mark-12 mortar, fired by an IRA unit, overshot Rosemount RUC station in County Londonderry and damaged several houses nearby.[148]
  • 8 May 1992: a 1,000 lb IRA car bomb exploded outside the RUC station in Fivemiletown, County Tyrone, injuring 10 civilians and causing substantial damage to civilian properties nearby, and structural damage to the security base itself.[149]
  • 9 May 1992: a number of incendiary devices exploded at the Metro Centre in Gateshead, Tyne and Wear, causing some damage.[145]
  • 9 May 1992: an IRA bomb exploded accidentally in Mullaghbawn, County Armagh, injuring the IRA volunteer who was assembling it.[150]
  • 12 May 1992: a British Army paratrooper lost both legs after an IRA bomb attack near Cappagh, County Tyrone. The incident triggered a series of clashes between British soldiers and local people in the town of Coalisland, which lasted until 17 May, when an army machine gun was stolen. Unionist officials accused Sinn Féin of instigating the riots.[151] At least three civilians and two soldiers were injured.[152][153]
  • 2 June 1992: an IRA unit carried out a mortar attack on a British Army checkpoint at Mullan Bridge, Kinawley, County Fermanagh.[154]
  • 7 June 1992: a British Police officer, Glenn Goodman, was shot dead after he stopped the car of an IRA volunteer on the A64 at Tadcaster, North Yorkshire, England. Another officer was shot and badly wounded.[124][155] IRA volunteers Paul Magee and Michael O'Brien were caught four days later. Magee was charged and convicted of murder,[156] while O'Brien was found guilty of attempted murder.[157][158] On the same day an IRA bomb exploded at the Royal Festival Hall in London.[145]
  • 10 June 1992: a small IRA bomb exploded in Wilcox Place, London.[145]
  • 15 June 1992: an IRA bomb exploded in a hijacked minicab in St. Albans.[145]
  • 21 June 1992: an IRA semtex blast bomb was thrown to an RUC patrol during a festival in Benburb, County Tyrone.[159]
  • 22 June 1992: a British army patrol was fired upon by an IRA sniper in Cookstown, County Tyrone.[160]
  • 25 June 1992: an IRA briefcase-bomb exploded under a car in Coleman Street, London; a police officer had to be treated for shock.[145]
  • 27 June 1992: an IRA bomb injured 21 people in the center of Belfast.[161]

July–August[edit]

  • 30 July 1992: two incendiary devices exploded in Milton Keynes causing minimal damage.[145]
  • 2 August 1992: a British soldier was injured in a gun battle with the IRA in Pomeroy, County Tyrone.[162]
  • 3 August 1992: a British soldier (Damian Shackleton) was shot dead by an IRA sniper team at Duncairn Avenue, New Lodge, Belfast. Shackleton was in the back of an army Land Rover when an IRA sniper fired from a block of flats, hitting him in the chest and causing a fatal wound.[124][163]
  • 20 August 1992: two British soldiers were wounded in an IRA attack at Grosvenor road, Belfast.[164]
  • 21 August 1992: a civilian (Isobel Leyland), a Belfast native visiting from England, was shot dead in a crossfire by the IRA during a gun battle in Ardoyne with the RUC. The IRA issued a statement after the attack apologising for the killing.[124][165]
  • 25 August 1992: an IRA firebomb exploded in the Shropshire Regimental museum in Shrewsbury Castle, Shropshire, England and two incendiary devices exploded in two furniture shops in Shrewsbury Town Centre.[145]
  • 27 August 1992: an unsuccessful attack was launched by a sniper on a British Army patrol at Carran Road, Crossmaglen, County Armagh.[166]
  • 28 August 1992: a British soldier (Paul Turner) was shot dead by a sniper in the main square of Crossmaglen, County Armagh. He was taking up position in the main square of the town when he was hit in the chest by a single bullet fired by an IRA sniper some 250 yards away.[124][167]

September–October[edit]

  • 6 September 1992: a small IRA bomb exploded at a Hilton Hotel in London.[145]
  • 17 September 1992: One bomb and four firebombs exploded at various locations around London.[145]
  • 23 September 1992: A massive 3,500 lb (1,600 kg) IRA truck-bomb exploded outside the Forensic Science Laboratory at Newtownbreda, South Belfast. The device almost completely demolished the Laboratory and damaged more than 1,000 homes in the surrounding area. The tremors from the blast were felt over 12 miles (19 km) away and the bomb was later assessed as probably the largest device ever detonated in Northern Ireland. There were no injuries in the attack as the IRA had given a 40-minute warning to evacuate the area,[168] although hundreds of residents had to be treated for shock. It was described as being as powerful as a "mini-nuke". The army bomb disposal team attempting to defuse it all lost their hearing, and several military vehicles were damaged.[169]
  • 30 September 1992: a UDA member (Harry Black) was shot dead by the IRA at a friend's home, Annadale Flats, Ballynafeigh, Belfast.[124]
  • 1 October 1992: a 15-men strong IRA unit, armed with rifles and machine guns, set up several checkpoints around the village of Meigh, County Armagh.[170]
  • 7 October 1992: five people were injured when an IRA bomb exploded in Piccadilly, London. Another bomb exploded on Flitcroft Street, London.[145]
  • 8 October 1992: one person was injured when an IRA bomb exploded underneath a car in Tooley Street, London. Another bomb exploded on Malcombe Street.[171]
  • 9 October 1992: an IRA bomb exploded in the carpark of the Royal British Legion building in Southgate, London.[171]
  • 9 October 1992: two explosive devices blew up outside two shops at Dungannon, County Tyrone, destroying both buildings. That same day, a bomb exploded outside a Belfast bank, causing minor damage.[172]
  • 10 October 1992: an RUC officer (James Douglas) was shot dead by the IRA in the Monico Bar, Lombard Street, Belfast.[124][173] In England, the IRA bombed Paddington Green police station, injuring one person.[171]
  • 12 October 1992: an explosive device exploded in a toilet of the Sussex Arms public house in Covent Garden, killing one person (David Heffer) and injuring four others.[26]
  • 19 October 1992: an IRA bomb explodes in Oxenden Street London, leaving two people requiring treatment for shock.[171]
  • 20 October 1992: a British soldier (Robert Irvine) was shot dead by the IRA at his home in Rasharkin, County Antrim.[124][174]
  • 21 October 1992: three people were injured when an IRA bomb was detonated at the Princess Louise Territorial Army Centre, Hammersmith Road, London. Two more people were wounded when the IRA bombed a railway line in Edmonton, England.[171]
  • 21 October 1992: the IRA detonated a 200 lb (91 kg) carbomb on the Main Street of Bangor, County Down.[175]
  • 22 October 1992: a sewage pipe is damaged by an IRA explosive device at Wick Lane, London.[176]
  • 25 October 1992: a small IRA bomb explodes in London damaging one building and a number of vehicles.[171]
  • 30 October 1992: a small IRA bomb explodes outside 10 Downing Street, the residence of the British Prime Minister.[171]
  • 31 October 1992: the IRA wiped out the IPLO in Belfast after a vicious internal IPLO feud and allegations that it was dealing drugs. The leader of the IPLO's breakaway Belfast Brigade, Sammy Ward, was shot dead in the Short Strand and several other high-ranking members were kneecapped. Their lives were spared on condition that the IPLO surrender and disband immediately. Within a few days both IPLO factions surrendered and disbanded. IPLO units in Newry and Armagh were not attacked and absolved of any involvement in criminality or drug dealing by the IRA.[124][177]

November–December[edit]

  • 13 November 1992: the IRA detonated a van-bomb in the centre of Coleraine, County Londonderry, causing extensive damage to the town centre.[175][178]
  • 14 November 1992: a British police officer was shot and injured by the IRA in London after confronting two men he had spotted acting suspiciously. The two men fled the seen and in a follow up search a truck-bomb was discovered and defused.[171]
  • 15 November 1992: an RUC officer (Alan Corbett) was shot dead by an IRA sniper while manning a vehicle checkpoint in Belcoo, County Fermanagh. It emerged that the sniper used an AK-47 assault rifle equipped with a night-sight and fired a single shot from high ground on the Donegal side of the border.[124][179]
  • 19 November 1992: an off-duty British soldier (Ian Warnock) was shot dead in Portadown, County Armagh. He was shot at least 12 times by an IRA volunteer who fired at close range. The soldier managed to return fire but is not believed to have hit any of his assailants.[124][179]
  • 21 November 1992: an alleged informer was shot dead by the IRA at Creggan, County Londonderry.[180]
  • 24 November 1992: an IRA unit exchanged fire with a combined British Army/RUC patrol at Castlederg, County Tyrone. The unit had been surprised outside the house of a Royal Irish Regiment soldier. More than 70 shots were fired.[181]
  • 24 November 1992: Four RUC members were injured in Belfast by an IRA jar-bomb.[182]
  • 25 November 1992: an IRA volunteer (Pearse Jordan) was shot dead by the RUC after his car was rammed by an undercover RUC vehicle in Belfast. After stumbling out of the car unarmed, Jordan was shot three times in the back by an RUC sergeant.[124][183]
  • 1 December 1992: an IRA van-bomb was made safe by the British Army in London after a telephoned warning.[184] In Belfast, two IRA bombs exploded injuring 27 people,[175] and an IRA unit fired a rocket at a British Army outpost on a Belfast's high-rise.[185]
  • 2 December 1992: British Police managed to disarm an IRA van bomb which was left in the West End of London.[186]
  • 4 December 1992: the IRA detonated two small bombs in Manchester, England; 64 people were injured.[184][186]
  • 7 December 1992: the first barrack buster mortar was launched against an RUC base in Ballygawley, County Tyrone.[187]
  • 9 December 1992: the IRA detonated two car-bombs on King Street, Belfast City centre.[188] In London, an IRA truck-bomb partially explodes in Woodside Park.[189]
  • 10 December 1992: two IRA bombs explode at Wood Green shopping centre in London injuring 11 people.[189]
  • 13 December 1992: an IRA unit fired at British troops in Annaghmartin, County Fermanagh; the RUC base there was also mortared.[190]
  • 13 December 1992: a British Army observation tower was hit by an IRA mortar round in Crossmaglen.[190][191]
  • 13 December 1992: the IRA attacked Oldpark RUC station in Belfast.[191]
  • 18 December 1992: the RUC base at Markethill, County Armagh, was damaged by an IRA mortar attack.[192]
  • 21 December 1992: a small IRA bomb exploded at Hampstead underground station in England. There were no injuries.[189][193]
  • 22 December 1992: a soldier was given a box of chocolates by a female motorist at a checkpoint in Cookstown, County Tyrone. Later, British Army experts found and defused a 1 kg Semtex device inside. The IRA is suspected.[193][194][195]
  • 24 December 1992: the IRA called a three-day ceasefire.[175]
  • 28 December 1992: the IRA ceasefire ended.
  • 30 December 1992: a British soldier was shot dead at his home in Cavehill Road, Belfast. Two IRA volunteers burst into the house armed with AK-47 assault rifles and shot the soldier at least 13 times at close range. The soldier's wife claimed that IRA volunteer Thomas Begley was one of the gunmen.[124][196]

1993[edit]

January–February[edit]

  • 5 January 1993: three soldiers were injured by a bomb in Belfast while evacuating Belfast's City Hall area after a warning was issued by an IRA telephone call.[197]
  • 6 January 1993: parts of London were cordoned off after IRA firebombs exploded in a number of stores.[198]
  • 6 January 1993: a 25 lb explosive device detonated in Dungannon,[where?] causing minor damage and no victims.[199]
  • 7 January 1993: the IRA attempted to detonate a bomb at an oil and gas storage depot in East Belfast. Another IRA bomb was defused in a bookshop in London.[189][198]
  • 8 January 1993: a British Army post was mortared and a helicopter attacked with machine-gun fire at Kinawley, County Fermanagh.[200]
  • 11 January 1993: the victim of an IRA punishment attack in Dungannon had to have one of his legs amputated.[198]
  • 11 January 1993: an IRA unit launched a rocket at an RUC base in south Belfast.[198]
  • 11 January 1993: a Protestant man (Matthew Boyd) was shot dead while driving his car along Donaghmore Road, Dungannon, County Tyrone. The IRA claimed the man was a UVF commander, responsible for the killings of Catholic civilians. This was denied by the dead man's family. CAIN lists Boyd as a civilian.[201]
  • 14 January 1993: the IRA fired a rocket at an RUC patrol in Derry.[198]
  • 14 January 1993: the IRA fired a mortar at an RUC base in Andersonstown, Belfast.[202]
  • 15 January 1993: the IRA exploded two bombs in Belfast, one of which ignited a fire that destroyed a car showroom.[203][204]
  • 15 January 1993: an IRA bomb blast targeted an Army and RUC patrol in Main Street, Carrickmore, County Tyrone, resulting in a number of injuries.[203]
  • 19 January 1993: the IRA's East Tyrone Brigade claimed that their volunteers uncovered and destroyed a British army observation post concealed in a derelict house in Drumcairne Forest, near Stewartstown. The same source claimed a British helicopter, a military ambulance and ground troops arrived to the scene shortly after, and that local residents believed that two soldiers had been wounded.[205][better source needed]
  • 20 January 1993: the IRA mortared Clogher RUC base in County Tyrone, causing considerable damage to the building.[198]
  • 23 January 1993: Michael Ferguson, an officer with the RUC, was shot dead by the IRA while on foot patrol on Shipquay Street, Derry. He was shot twice in the back of the head at close range by a lone gunman.[206][207]
  • 23 January 1993: an off-duty British soldier and a gunman were injured in a shoot-out at Newtownstewart, County Tyrone. The IRA claimed that a 600 lb bomb failed to explode at Cappagh, County Tyrone.[208]
  • 23 January 1993: republican sources claimed an IRA unit had fired 200 machine gun rounds on a British army outpost at Newtownbutler, County Fermanagh. A similar attack was carried out the next day on another observation post in Killyvilly, County Fermanagh.[209][better source needed]
  • 27 January 1993: an IRA bomb exploded outside Harrods, London, injuring four people.[198]
  • 3 February 1993: two small IRA bombs exploded in England. One at South Kensington underground station in London and the other at Kent House railway station.[210]
  • 6 February 1993: the IRA fired a Mark-16 grenade at a British Army patrol on Ross Street, Belfast.[211]
  • 9 February 1993: a British soldier (Michael Beswick) was killed and four others badly wounded when an IRA remote-controlled bomb, affixed to a nearby wall, detonated as a foot patrol passed on Cathedral Road, Armagh town.[198][207][212]
  • 10 February 1993: a small IRA bomb exploded in a residential area of London.[198]
  • 12 February 1993: a bomb is thrown at British troops by an IRA unit near Cookstown, County Tyrone, but the device failed to explode.[213]
  • 15 February 1993: Mervyn Johnson, a Royal Irish Regiment (RIR) soldier, was shot dead by the IRA outside his home, Highfern Gardens, Highfield, Belfast. He was walking down the street when a car drew alongside and fired a burst of shots from an AK-47 assault rifle, hitting the soldier four times. As he lay wounded a second gunman stepped out of the car and shot the victim three times in the head with a handgun.[207][214]
  • 20 February 1993: a rocket injured four British soldiers when it hit their patrol vehicle in the Woodburn area of Belfast.[211]
  • 20 February 1993: three Protestant male civilians were shot and injured at a bar in Belfast; the IRA claimed one was a soldier in the Royal Irish Regiment (RIR).[198]
  • 21 February 1993: Dunnes Stores in the Park Centre, Belfast, was firebombed by the IRA.[215]
  • 22 February 1993: two RUC officers were injured in an IRA bomb attack on a base in Derry.[198]
  • 24 February 1993: an RUC officer (Reginald Williamson) was killed by an IRA booby-trap bomb attached to his car, which exploded while he travelled along Lislasley Road, near Loughgall, County Armagh.[207][214]
  • 25 February 1993: a RUC officer (Jonathan Reid) was shot dead by a sniper while on joint British Army and RUC foot patrol in Crossmaglen, County Armagh. He was taking cover at the side of a road. When he stood up he was hit by a single bullet which struck him in the chest.[214]
  • 26 February 1993: a British police officer was shot and injured by the IRA in Warrington, England after stopping a suspect car. Three bombs later exploded at the nearby gasworks causing extensive damage.[210]
  • 27 February 1993: the IRA detonated a bomb at Camden Market in London; 18 people were injured.[198]

March–April[edit]

  • 1 March 1993: an IRA unit launched two mortar bombs at a security base in Bessbrook, County Armagh; at least three people were injured and 30 houses suffered damage.[216]
  • 6 March 1993: the IRA ambushed a car carrying two loyalist paramilitary figures. One was shot and wounded in the attack which took place in the Shankill area of Belfast.[citation needed]
  • 7 March 1993: four RUC officers were badly injured when the IRA detonated a car-bomb on the Main Street of Bangor, County Down.[217]
  • 7 March 1993: an IRA unit fired several shots on a former UDR soldier at his home in Dungannon, County Tyrone, injuring his nine-year-old son.[217]
  • 8 March 1993: two RUC officers and three civilians were wounded by an IRA bomb blast in Belfast. Another RUC officer was shot and wounded at a Belfast checkpoint.[218]
  • 8 March 1993: the IRA launched a mortar attack on Keady British Army base, County Armagh. A civilian (Nigel McCollum) who was working as a contractor for the British Army was killed when three barrack buster mortars were fired into the base. He had been operating a crane when it was struck by one of the mortars. McCollum's brother (Reginald McCollum), an off-duty RIR soldier, would be killed a year later, in 1994, by the IRA; their grandmother (Lilly McCollum) had been killed in 1983 in a republican attack on her brother, a member of the UDR.[207][219]
  • 9 March 1993: the IRA took over two houses in the Woodburn area of Belfast and fired a rocket from a window at a British foot patrol.[220]
  • 9 March 1993: a British soldier was shot and wounded by the IRA in east Belfast.[198]
  • 10 March 1993: Norman Truesdale was shot dead by two IRA volunteers who entered his shop in Oldpark, Belfast. The first volunteer shot Truesdale a number of times in the chest at close range and the second shot him with an AK-47 assault rifle as he lay wounded on the floor. Truesdale's family denied he was a member of any paramilitary group, but he is listed in CAIN as a member of the Ulster Defence Association (UDA).[198][207][221]
  • 13 March 1993: the IRA mortared a British Army observation post at Glasdrumman, County Armagh.[198]
  • 17 March 1993: a British soldier (Lawrence Dickson) was shot dead by a sniper in Forkill, County Armagh. The patrol were in pursuit of a man who had been acting suspiciously when a single high velocity shot was fired by a sniper who is believed to have been in a nearby vehicle. The bullet hit the soldier in the side and he died a short time later. Another British soldier returned fire at the vehicle but scored no hits.[207][222]
  • 20 March 1993: two IRA bombs exploded in Warrington, England, killing two children (Johnathan Ball and Tim Parry) and injuring more than 50 people. A coded but inaccurate warning was issued to the Samaritans, which, police said, placed the bomb outside a Boots chemist shop in Liverpool, 16 miles (26 km) away from Boots in Warrington, where the detonation occurred.[223]
  • 25 March 1993: there was a multiple weapons attack by the IRA on a British Army watchtower, the Borucki sangar, in Crossmaglen, County Armagh.[80]
  • 3 April 1993: a British soldier was shot and injured by the IRA near Crossmaglen, South Armagh.[80]
  • 7 April 1993: three British soldiers were wounded when the IRA mortared their base in Crossmaglen. The IRA also detonated a bomb at a Conservative Party club in London.[198]
  • 22 April 1993: the small South Armagh village of Cullaville, along the border with the Republic, was taken over by an IRA unit for two hours (see Occupation of Cullaville).[224][225]
  • 23 April 1993: a small IRA bomb detonated at an Esso oil refinery in North Shields, England, causing moderate damage.[210]
  • 24 April 1993: the IRA detonated a huge truck bomb at Bishopsgate in the City of London, which killed one person and injured 44 more. The explosion caused damage estimated at £350 million.[citation needed] The police confirmed the IRA had phoned in 18 accurate warnings before the explosion. The man who was killed (Eddie Henty) was a press photographer who appears to have slipped through the security cordon to obtain footage of the explosion.[226] The device delivered the equivalent to 1,200 kg. of TNT, and was compared with the power of a tactical nuclear device.[227][228] Two bombs exploded in hijacked minicabs in London, but there were no injuries.[26][229]
  • 25 April 1993: a former UDR soldier (David Martin) was killed when an IRA booby trap exploded underneath his car while travelling along Flo Road, Kildress, near Cookstown, County Tyrone.[226]

May–June[edit]

  • 6 May 1993: a British soldier was badly injured in an IRA car-bomb attack in Lurgan.[198]
  • 9 May 1993: two IRA incendiary devices ignited in the Galleries shopping centre in Bristol, causing damage but no injuries.[210]
  • 12 May 1993: an IRA incendiary device partially detonated in the Cornmarket area of Oxford.
  • 20 May 1993: a 1,000 lb (450 kg) IRA bomb exploded in Glengall Street, Belfast, causing over 5 million pounds worth of damage.[198]
  • 22 May 1993: a 1,000 lb (450 kg) IRA bomb devastated Portadown's town centre.[198]
  • 23 May 1993: a 200 lb (91 kg) IRA bomb wrecked a hotel in south Belfast.[198]
  • 23 May 1993: an IRA bomb containing over 1,500 lb (680 kg) of explosives was detonated in the centre of Magherafelt, County Londonderry, causing millions of pounds worth of damage.[198][230]
  • 26 May 1993: a British soldier was wounded in an IRA attack in East Belfast.[198]
  • 31 May 1993: a British soldier (Christopher Wren) was killed by an IRA booby trap bomb attached to his car while on duty in Moneymore, County Londonderry.[207][231]
  • 6 June 1993: two RUC officers were injured in an IRA bomb attack in West Belfast.[198]
  • 6 June 1993: the IRA mortared the RUC base in Carrickmore, County Tyrone.[198]
  • 7 June 1993: the IRA detonated a bomb at a gasworks in Tyneside, England.[198]
  • 9 June 1993: an IRA bomb exploded at a petrol storage depot in Tyneside, England. Two small IRA bombs exploded at an Esso oil refinery in North Shields.[198][210]
  • 11 June 1993: the IRA mortared Crossmaglen British Army base, County Armagh.[80]
  • 22 June 1993: the IRA detonated a bomb at a hotel in Newry.[198]
  • 23 June 1993: an IRA volunteer (Joseph Mulhern) was found shot by side of road, Ballymongan, near Castlederg, County Tyrone, as an alleged informer.[207]
  • 24 June 1993: a former UDR soldier (John Lyness) died after being shot several times at close range by the IRA outside his home, Lime Grove, Lurgan, County Armagh. He had seen his killers approaching and was armed with his personal protection weapon drawn but did not have time to use it.[207][232]
  • 26 June 1993: a British soldier (John Randall) was shot dead by an IRA sniper near Newtownhamilton, County Armagh. He had been patrolling a field when the sniper fired a single high-velocity shot from the back of a stationary vehicle which hit Randall in the stomach.[207][233]

July–August[edit]

  • 3 July 1993: Strabane courthouse was bombed by the IRA.[198]
  • 5 July 1993: a 1,500 lb bomb caused extensive damaged in the centre of Newtownards, County Down.[234]
  • 10 July 1993: a barn near Dungannon was hit by an IRA mortar bomb that appeared to have detonated prematurely. A suspected IRA volunteer was later arrested at Newtownstewart while heading towards the border. He was apparently injured in the mishap and admitted to a Belfast hospital under armed guard.[235]
  • 15 July 1993: an IRA car-bomb exploded at central station in Belfast causing extensive damage.[198]
  • 17 July 1993: a British soldier (Kevin Pullin) was shot dead by a sniper while on foot patrol, Carran Road, Crossmaglen, County Armagh.[207]
  • 18 July 1993: a large IRA car bomb was defused in the town of Banbridge, County Down, by a British Army disposal team which carried out a controlled explosion; 50 houses were evacuated for a lapse of five hours.[236]
  • 25 July 1993: riots erupted in Dungannon, County Tyrone, after a combined Army/RUC patrol came under attack by the IRA.[237]
  • 31 July 1993: a British Army mobile checkpoint is fired at by an IRA sniper at Newtownhamilton, County Armagh. The British patrol manning the checkpoint returned fire.[238]
  • 12 August 1993: five RUC officers and four civilians were wounded in an IRA attack in South Belfast.[198]
  • 13 August 1993: the IRA firebombed six premises in Bournemouth, England and also detonated a bomb on the pier.[198]
  • 14 August 1993: a 21 lb (9.5 kg) IRA bomb exploded outside a restaurant in Derry.[198]
  • 14 August 1993: an IRA bomb exploded in along the route of the Apprentice boys march in Derry.[239]
  • 16 August 1993: the IRA carried out a bomb attack in downtown Strabane, County Tyrone.[240]
  • 18 August 1993: the IRA detonated a car-bomb in Dublin Road, in the centre of Belfast city. The blast caused over 750,000 pounds worth of damage.[198]
  • 20 August 1993: an IRA mortar attack on Newry's courthouse wounded ten people, among them a 10-year boy and two RUC officers. The courthouse had been closed since 1985, following a previous IRA attack.[241]
  • 22 August 1993: the IRA detonated a bomb on Gloucester Street, Belfast, causing considerable damage.[198]
  • 23 August 1993: the IRA detonated a car-bomb outside a bank on the Ormeau Road causing extensive damage.[198]
  • 27 August 1993: the IRA mortared Lisnaskea RUC barracks in Fermanagh. Over 60 nearby homes were damaged in the attack; the IRA also carried out a bomb attack against a British patrol in the Markets area of Belfast.[198]
  • 28 August 1993: British police defused an IRA bomb in London; the device was left within London's brand new high-tech security barrier dubbed the "Ring of Steel" built after the Bishopsgate bombing.[198]
  • 29 August 1993: gunshots were exchanged between the Provisional and the Official IRA in the Markets area of Belfast.[198]
  • 31 August 1993: the IRA detonated a car-bomb at a shopping centre in South Belfast, causing over 1 million pounds worth of damage. In a separate attack in Ardoyne, two British soldiers were wounded when the IRA detonated a car-bomb near their patrol.[198]

September–October[edit]

  • 1 September 1993: two IRA bombs were defused by the British Army in Cullyhanna, County Armagh.[198]
  • 1 September 1993: an IRA bomb hit a supermarket at Derriaghy, north of Belfast, and injured two RUC officers.[242]
  • 3 September 1993: a massive IRA car-bomb devastated the centre of Armagh City.[198]
  • 10 September 1993: Belfast's transport links were disrupted by a number of IRA hoax alerts.[198]
  • 13 September 1993: the IRA bombed Stormont hotel, injuring an RUC officer and two civilians.[198]
  • 14 September 1993: the IRA detonated a bomb at a hotel in Strabane, causing serious damage.[198]
  • 15 September 1993: the IRA shot dead a Catholic man (Adrian McGovern) outside his home, Stoneyford Road, Lisburn, County Antrim. He was a contractor to the BA/RUC. The IRA claimed he had been supplying the RUC with information on republicans.[198][243]
  • 16 September 1993: three IRA incendiary devices were made safe in two separate cinemas in London.[244]
  • 21 September 1993: a British soldier was wounded when an IRA unit threw a blast-bomb at his patrol in the Ardoyne area of Belfast.[198]
  • 23 September 1993: a fierce exchange of gunfire occurred between a number IRA armed trucks and British Army helicopters in south County Armagh, east of Crossmaglen. The IRA units used a large number of assault rifles and at least one heavy-machine gun. All the IRA volunteers managed to slip away in their vehicles, but a number of weapons were confiscated in the aftermath (see Battle of Newry Road).[80][198]
  • 27 September 1993: a 300 lb (140 kg) IRA car-bomb caused extensive damage to the centre of Belfast; another, larger IRA car-bomb wrecked commercial premises in South Belfast.[198]
  • 30 September 1993: a hotel in Markethill was badly damaged in an IRA bomb attack.[198]
  • 1 October 1993: six IRA firebombs detonated in commercial premises in Belfast, Lisburn and Newtownabbey.[198]
  • 2 October 1993: three IRA bombs exploded in Hampstead, North London, injuring six people.[198]
  • 3 October 1993: the IRA bombed a hotel in Newtownabbey, County Antrim.[198]
  • 4 October 1993: five IRA bombs detonated in North London, injuring four people and destroying a number of businesses.[198]
  • 8 October 1993: two IRA bombs exploded in North London.[198]
  • 9 October 1993: the IRA mortared a British Army base in Kilkeel, County Down. The attack came from a 12-tube Mk-15 multiple mortar.[198][245]
  • 11 October 1993: the IRA firebombed three commercial premises in Belfast and one in Lisburn.[198]
  • 15 October 1993: two bombs inflicted damage on a courthouse at Cookstown, County Tyrone.[246]
  • 18 October 1993: the IRA bombed a restaurant in Castlederg, County Tyrone.[198]
  • 21 October 1993: the manager of a security firm with contracts to the British Army was shot dead by the IRA at his home in Glengormley, County Antrim.[198]
  • 23 October 1993: Shankill Road bombing: eight civilians, one UDA member and one IRA volunteer (Thomas Begley) were killed when an IRA bomb prematurely exploded at a fish shop on Shankill Road, Belfast. The IRA's intended target was a meeting of loyalist paramilitary leaders, which was scheduled to take place in a room above the shop. However, unbeknownst to the IRA, the meeting had been re-scheduled.[247]
  • 24 October 1993: an IRA bomb exploded on a railway line in Berkshire, England. Other devices were defused at Reading and Basingstoke stations.[198]
  • 25 October 1993: the IRA detonated a bomb on a bridge above a railway line in Buckinghamshire, England.[198]
  • 27 October 1993: an IRA unit carried out a gun attack on a British checkpoint in Derriaghy, near Belfast.[198]
  • 29 October 1993: a small IRA bomb exploded in Edwards Square, London.[244]

November–December[edit]

  • 2 November 1993: RUC officer Brian Woods died two days after being shot by an IRA sniper while at an RUC Vehicle Check Point (VCP), Upper Edward Street, Newry, County Down. A single shot hit him in the neck.[207][248]
  • 7 November 1993: a British soldier was shot and wounded by an IRA sniper in New Lodge, Belfast.[198]
  • 7 November 1993: an IRA unit attacked with machine-gun fire and mortars an RUC base in Caledon, County Tyrone. A nearby church and several houses were also damaged.[198][249]
  • 12 November 1993: an IRA unit attacked a British Army watchtower—the Crossmaglen RUC Station and Army Barracks, also known as the Borucki Sanger Golf Five Zero—with an improvised flamethrower towed by a tractor in Crossmaglen, County Armagh. It was named for James Borucki, a British soldier who died in an IRA bombing in Crossmaglen on 8 August 1976. The device consisted of a manure spreader which doused the facility with fuel, ignited few seconds later by a small explosion. A nine meters-high fireball engulfed the tower. Four British soldiers inside were rescued by a Saxon armored vehicle.[250][251]
  • 21 November 1993: an IRA unit attacked with gunfire the house of a former UDR soldier in Cookstown, County Tyrone; no one was injured.[252]
  • 29 November 1993: the IRA carried out a gun and bomb attack on the home of an RUC officer in Armagh town.[198]
  • 30 November 1993: a massive IRA bomb was defused two-miles (3 km) outside Armagh town.[198]
  • 2 December 1993: a British soldier (Paul Garrett) was shot dead by a sniper while on foot-patrol, Victoria Street, Keady, County Armagh. He was hit in the stomach by a single bullet fired from a nearby hill.[207][253]
  • 3 December 1993: a massive IRA bomb was defused in the Poleglass area of Belfast.[198]
  • 7 December 1993: an IRA unit mortared Newtownbutler RUC barracks in Fermanagh.[198]
  • 12 December 1993: two RUC officers (Constables Andrew Beacom and Ernest Smith) were shot dead by the IRA while traveling in their patrol car in Fivemiletown, County Tyrone.[207] The patrol car was on Main Street when it was hit by at least 20 shots from both sides of the street. In a follow up operation a British Army helicopter was fired on by the IRA.[254]
  • 14 December 1993: an IRA bomb exploded on a railway track in Woking, Surrey, England, disrupting commuter services.[198]
  • 14 December 1993: two soldiers were wounded by a bomb blast in Derry.[255]
  • 16 December 1993: two further IRA bombs on the Surrey railway were defused.[198]
  • 19 December 1993: an IRA landmine attack on a British patrol in Derry left six civilians - three adults and two children near the device - in need of hospital treatment.[198]
  • 20 December 1993: a British soldier and a civilian were wounded in an IRA bomb attack in the Suffolk area of Belfast. A number of IRA firebombs exploded in stores and a post-office in London causing minor damage. Seven incendiary devices were made safe.[198][256]
  • 23 December 1993: the IRA announced a three-day Christmas ceasefire.[198]
  • 27 December 1993: the IRA ceasefire ended with a mortar attack on Fintona RUC base, County Tyrone; a car-bomb attack on Springfield Road RUC base in Belfast; and a gun and bomb attack on a British Army base in Portadown, County Armagh.[198]
  • 28 December 1993: a British soldier was injured when the IRA fired a horizontal mortar at a foot-patrol in Belfast.[citation needed]
  • 29 December 1993: an IRA unit fired a missile at a British patrol on Upper Library Street in Belfast.[198] The IRA claimed that this was a new armour-piercing mortar projectile.[257]
  • 30 December 1993: a British soldier (Daniel Blinco) was shot dead by an IRA sniper while on foot-patrol in Crossmaglen, County Armagh.[207][258]

1994[edit]

January–February[edit]

  • 1 January 1994: almost a dozen premises in and around Belfast were firebombed by the IRA including the Linen Hall Library.[259]
  • 6 January 1994: an IRA unit fired a grenade at a British patrol on the Springfield Road Belfast.[259]
  • 11 January 1994: two British soldiers were injured by an IRA booby-trap outside their base in Crossmaglen, County Armagh,[259] right after a mortar attack on the barracks there.[260]
  • 11 January 1994: three RUC officers were injured when their patrol vehicle was hit by an IRA rocket in the Short Strand area of Belfast.[259]
  • 12 January 1994: a female British soldier was shot and wounded by an IRA sniper in the New Lodge area of Belfast.[261] Troops returned fire. An RUC officer and a number of civilians suffered minor injuries when a bomb aimed at a British Army patrol demolished a nearby building 50 minutes later. A loaded rifle was recovered and two men arrested in the aftermath.[262]
  • 15 January 1994: two stores in Belfast and one in Newtownards were damaged by IRA firebombs.[259]
  • 16 January 1994: seven men were arrested after an IRA barrack buster rocket was discovered near Clogher, County Tyrone.[259]
  • 19 January 1994: three stores in Coleraine and Limavady were damaged by IRA firebombs. Devices were also found in four other premises.[259]
  • 22 January 1994: a British Army Land Rover was hit by an IRA rocket while on patrol in Poleglass, West Belfast.[259]
  • 23 January 1994: two civilian were injured by a bomb intended for security forces at the town of Dungannon, County Tyrone.[263]
  • 24 January 1994: a RUC officer escaped injury after an IRA unit opened fire at him in County Fermanagh.[259]
  • 27 January 1994: IRA bombs exploded in three stores in Oxford Street, London.[259]
  • 28 January 1994: an IRA firebomb exploded in Oxford Street, London, and another was discovered.[259]
  • 30 January 1994: an IRA rocket was fired at a British Army post in the New Lodge area of Belfast.[259]
  • 3 February 1994: an IRA unit planted a bomb outside the home of an RUC assistant Chief Constable in Derry.[259]
  • 6 February 1994: three British soldiers were injured when an IRA horizontal mortar hit their patrol vehicle in Poleglass, West Belfast.[259]
  • 16 February 1994: four British soldiers were wounded by an IRA roadside bomb, one seriously, while on patrol at Short Strand, east Belfast. An RUC officer was also injured.[264]
  • 17 February 1994: a RUC officer (William Beacom) was killed and two others seriously injured when the IRA fired a homemade rocket at an RUC patrol vehicle on Friendly Street in the Market Quarter, South Belfast.[259][265]
  • 18 February 1994: an IRA incendiary device was defused in a shop at Charing Cross, London.[256]
  • 19 February 1994: a number of incendiary devices were left in shops in London, including Burton stores in Regent Street and New Oxford Street. One device destroyed a newsagents shop, three caused minor damage, and several others were made safe.[26]
  • 20 February 1994: an IRA unit fired a rocket at a British patrol car in Poleglass, West Belfast.[259]
  • 21 February 1994: an IRA mortar attack destroyed an RUC base and caused widespread damage in Beragh, County Tyrone.[259]

March–April[edit]

  • 2 March 1994: the IRA carried out a horizontal mortar attack on a British patrol in west Belfast.[259]
  • 8 March 1994: four Mark-6 mortar shells[266] were fired from a car towards Heathrow Airport near London. The shells landed on or near the northern runway, but failed to explode.[26]
  • 10 March 1994: the IRA launched a second attack on Heathrow Airport, firing four mortar shells over the perimeter fence which landed near Terminal Four but failed to explode.[26]
  • 10 March 1994: an off-duty RUC officer (John Haggan) was shot dead by the IRA at the Dunmore Greyhound Stadium, off Antrim Road, Belfast. The officer was in the lounge when he was shot in the head by an IRA volunteer and shot again as he lay on the ground. A second IRA volunteer fired into the ceiling to cover their escape.[259][267]
  • 13 March 1994: the IRA defied tightened security to launch a third attack on Heathrow Airport, firing five mortar shells over the perimeter fence which landed near Terminal Four but failed to explode.[26] Later that night both Heathrow and Gatwick airports were closed for two hours after coded telephoned bomb threats were received.[268]
  • 13 March 1994: an IRA arms cache was discovered at a college in Belfast. A grenade, a rifle, a pistol, a homemade bomb, a number of detonators, 2 lb of explosive and over 1,500 rounds of ammunition were captured.[259]
  • 20 March 1994: a shell from a Mark-10 mortar hit a British Army Lynx helicopter attempting to land at a base in Crossmaglen. an RUC officer was pulled out of the blazing helicopter before it exploded.[259][265][269]
  • 31 March 1994: Portadown RUC base came under attack from an IRA unit using rockets and automatic weapons.[259]
  • 1 April 1994: a RUC officer was killed when the IRA fired a horizontal mortar at a British Army patrol in the Waterside area of Derry City. Several other RUC officers were injured.[265][270]
  • 5 April 1994: the IRA began a three-day ceasefire in an attempt to show it was serious about bringing about an end to the conflict.[259]
  • 8 April 1994: the three-day IRA ceasefire ended at midnight.
  • 9 April 1994: an IRA unit attacked two checkpoints near Newtownbutler, Fermanagh with automatic weapons.[259] One of the attacks on an outpost manned by the British Army lasted five minutes.[271] A British patrol in Stewartstown, Belfast, came under IRA rocket attack. A border checkpoint was mortared by an IRA unit at Aughnacloy, County Tyrone.[259]
  • 15 April 1994: a RUC patrol came under IRA rocket attack in Armagh town.[259]
  • 20 April 1994: a IRA unit launched a horizontal mortar bomb at an RUC patrol on Spencer Road, Derry. An RUC officer was killed.[259]
  • 24 April 1994: the IRA shot dead two men (John McCloy and Alan Smith) as they sat in a stationary car, at Main Street, Garvagh, County Londonderry. The IRA alleged that Smith was a member of the Ulster Defence Association (UDA) but this was denied by family and friends. Both men are listed as civilians at CAIN.
  • 25 April 1994: a British soldier was injured when a mortar hit Crossmaglen British Army base, County Armagh.[272][273]
  • 25 April 1994: Sixteen alleged drug-dealers were kneecapped by the IRA across Belfast.[259]
  • 26 April 1994: an alleged drug dealer (Francis Rice) was shot five times in the head and his body dumped on a grass verge beside Half Moon Lake, off Suffolk Road, Belfast. Earlier in the day a three-man IRA unit burst into his home and he had escaped by jumping out a first story window.[259][274]
  • 28 April 1994: a former UDR soldier (Eric Smyth) was shot dead by the IRA outside his home, Salters Grange Road, near Armagh town.[265]
  • 29 April 1994: Michael Brown, a native of County Leitrim, was found shot dead by the PIRA by the side of Omeath Road, near Newry, County Down. He was killed as an alleged informer.[265]

May–June[edit]

  • 1 May 1994: two alleged drug dealers were kneecapped by the IRA.[265]
  • 6 May 1994: an IRA unit fired a rocket at a British Army patrol in the Lenadoon area of Belfast. A woman who was standing nearby was wounded by shrapnel.[265]
  • 11 May 1994: an IRA unit launched an attack against a British observation post in west Belfast.[265]
  • 12 May 1994: the homes of two RUC officers were bombed by the IRA. An IRA unit also launched a mortar at an RUC base in Newry and a rocket was fired at a British patrol in Poleglass, West Belfast.[265]
  • 13 May 1994: Fred Anthony, a civilian employed by the RUC, was killed by the IRA after a booby trap bomb exploded beneath his car as he drove along Hill Street, Lurgan, County Armagh.[265][275]
  • 14 May 1994: a British soldier (David Wilson) was killed when the IRA detonated a bomb next to a British Army permanent vehicle checkpoint at Castleblaney Road, Keady, County Armagh. Another soldier was injured.[265][276]
  • 21 May 1994: a Royal Irish Regiment (RIR) soldier from Cookstown, County Tyrone, was kidnapped by the IRA and later found shot dead in a field near Mullaghcreevie housing estate in Armagh town. His brother Nigel (a British Army employee) was killed by the IRA the previous year, and their grandmother (Lilly McCollum) was killed in 1983 in an attack on her brother, a member of the UDR.[265][277]
  • 21 May 1994: an IRA volunteer (Martin Doherty) manning the doors of The Widow Scallan's pub in Dublin was shot dead while the UVF attempted a bomb and gun attack on IRA and Sinn Féin republicans gathered inside at an event.[265]
  • 23 May 1994: the IRA shot dead a man in central Belfast. The man had been training with the British Army but had been discharged on medical grounds.[278]
  • 23 May 1994: the IRA bombed Fort George British Army base in Derry, injuring one soldier.[261]
  • 27 May 1994: an IRA unit raked a British Army checkpoint with gunfire from a van at Aughnacloy, County Tyrone, then crossed the border into the Republic.[279]
  • 30 May 1994: an IRA unit mortared a British Army base in Tempo, County Fermanagh.[265]
  • 4 June 1994: a leading loyalist paramilitary was injured in an IRA bomb attack in Portadown.[265]
  • 10 June 1994: three British soldiers were wounded when an IRA unit mortared a military checkpoint in Crossmaglen, South Armagh.[265]
  • 13 June 1994: an IRA bomb exploded at a railroad station in Hertfordshire, England.[265]
  • 17 June 1994: the IRA launched a horizontal mortar at an RUC patrol in West Belfast, but missed their target.[261]
  • 21 June 1994: an IRA unit fired a rocket at an RUC patrol in west Belfast.[265]
  • 23 June 1994: two civilians were injured when an IRA bomb exploded in a farmhouse at Cabra, near Dungannon, County Tyrone.[259]
  • 26 June 1994: the IRA mortared Pomeroy RUC base, County Tyrone.[259]
  • 26 June 1994: an IRA unit fired an horizontal mortar at a British Army Land Rover in West Belfast.[259]

July–August[edit]

  • 2 July 1994: three IRA Mk-15 mortar rounds hit the Royal Irish Regiment barracks at Malone Road, Belfast. A number of people attending a wedding in a nearby church were treated from shock.[280]
  • 4 July 1994: seven people were injured when an IRA mortar overshot its target (a British Army patrol) and landed in the carpark of a church in south Belfast.[265]
  • 8 July 1994: two British soldiers were injured when their patrol vehicle was hit by an IRA rocket in the Suffolk area of Belfast.[265]
  • 10 July 1994: the IRA launched a gun attack on the home of DUP politician Willie McCrea, in Magherafelt, County Londonderry; there was some damage but no injuries.[281]
  • 11 July 1994: a member of the Ulster Democratic Party, Ray Smallwoods, was shot dead by the IRA in Lisburn. A five-member IRA unit consisting of four men and one woman took over a nearby house the night before. As he left his home the next morning one IRA volunteer ran down the street and blasted him several times with a shotgun. Smallwoods was a leading member of the UDA and was one of those involved in the unsuccessful assassination attempts on the lives of Bernadette and Michael McAliskey.[265][282]
  • 12 July 1994: a two-ton IRA lorry bomb was discovered in Heysham, England.[265]
  • 12 July 1994: a RAF Puma helicopter was hit by an IRA mortar over Newtownhamilton and forced to crash land on a soccer field.[259][283]
  • 15 July 1994: two constables, an arrested Sinn Féin councillor and an elderly woman motorist were wounded in an IRA gun attack on an RUC vehicle in Killeshil, near Dungannon, County Tyrone.[259]
  • 17 July 1994: a female Catholic civilian from Belfast (Caroline Moreland) was shot dead by the IRA as an alleged informer. Her body was dumped at Clogh, near Rosslea, County Fermanagh.[284]
  • 20 July 1994: an RUC officer was injured in Cookstown, County Tyrone, when an IRA bomb struck an RUC vehicle.[265]
  • 21 July 1994: an IRA suitcase-bomb was discovered at Reading Railway Station.[285]
  • 24 July 1994: the IRA launched a landmine attack on a RUC patrol in Castlewellan, County Down.[265]
  • 25 July 1994: a British soldier was shot and wounded by the IRA in Crossmaglen, County Armagh.[259]
  • 29 July 1994: more than 40 people were injured when the IRA fired three mortar bombs into Newry RUC base.[265]
  • 31 July 1994: two UDA members, Raymond Elder and Joe Bratty, were shot dead by the IRA on the Ormeau Road in Belfast.[265] The pair were ambushed by two IRA gunmen armed with AK-47 assault rifles. Up to 50 shots were fired and Bratty was hit at least 18 times. As the UDA men lay wounded on the ground one of the IRA volunteers leaned over them shooting at close range. As the IRA unit made their escape in a getaway car they were pursued by the RUC, shots were exchanged before the IRA car was brought to a halt but the gunmen escaped on foot.[286]
  • 3 August 1994: three British soldiers were injured when the IRA mortared Newtownhamilton British Army base.[265]
  • 6 August 1994: an RUC officer and a civilian were hurt in an IRA grenade attack at a Belfast court house.[261]
  • 8 August 1994: an off-duty British soldier (Trelford Withers, aged 46) was shot dead by the IRA in Crossgar, County Down.[265] The soldier was shot twice in the side of the head by a lone IRA gunman. He was the last British soldier to be killed before the IRA's 1994 ceasefire.[287]
  • 13 August 1994: an explosive device left in a bicycle detonated in a shopping centre in the beach town of Bognor Regis, West Sussex, damaging 15 shops but causing no injuries. A similar device found on Brighton Pier was made safe using a controlled explosion.[26]
  • 17 August 1994: the IRA bombed two loyalist pubs in Belfast: the Grove Tavern and the Berlin Arms. There were no injuries.[261]
  • 18 August 1994: an IRA firebomb exploded in a bar on the Ormeau Road, Belfast.[259]
  • 18 August 1994: Martin Cahill (AKA The General), a Dublin criminal, was shot dead by the IRA outside his home in Rathmines.[265] He was shot four times at close range with a .357 Magnum through the window of his car. The IRA claimed he was closely associated with the UVF and had aided them in the attack on the Widow Scallans Pub in Dublin in which an IRA volunteer was shot dead.[288]
  • 21 August 1994: the IRA mortared a British Army base in Rosslea, County Fermanagh.[259]
  • 21 August 1994: an IRA bomb destroyed the empty car of a British soldier in Maghera, County Londonderry.[259][289]
  • 22 August 1994: a high explosive device was defused outside a Laura Ashley shop in Regent Street, London.[26]
  • 26 August 1994: an IRA mortar bomb missed the RUC base at Donemana, County Tyrone.[259]
  • 27 August 1994: an IRA mortar bomb fired from a farm trailer exploded 200 yards short of Cloghoge checkpoint, County Armagh.[290]
  • 28 August 1994: an IRA mortar bomb exploded prematurely in its launch tube at a car-park in Downpatrick, County Down.[261]
  • 29 August 1994: the IRA fired a rocket at the RUC base in Toome, County Antrim.[261]
  • 30 August 1994: the IRA carried out a bomb attack on an RUC base at Springfield Road, Belfast.[290]
  • 30 August 1994: the IRA launched a mortar bomb at Fort Whiterock British Army base at Springfield Road, Belfast.[290]
  • 31 August 1994: the IRA declared the first of two ceasefires in the 1990s.[291]

September–December[edit]

  • 6 September 1994: six IRA volunteers attempted to escape from Whitemoor Jail in Cambridgeshire, England.[259]
  • 22 September 1994: a Derry man sustained a broken leg in an IRA punishment beating.[259]
  • 10 November 1994: a Post Office worker (Frank Kerr) was shot dead when IRA members raided a Royal Mail sorting office in Newry.[265] The IRA admitted they had carried out the attack but claimed it was not sanctioned by the Army Council and that the ceasefire still stood.[292]

1995[edit]

  • 29 April 1995: a drug dealer suspected of importing ecstasy tablets into Northern Ireland was shot dead by two gunmen in a bar in central Belfast. The IRA did not claim responsibility but security forces stated that they were responsible. This killing was the first planned assassination by the IRA since the 1994 ceasefire.[293]
  • 5 September 1995: Tony Kane (aged 29) was shot dead by the IRA as he sat in his car in Andersonstown, Belfast. Kane had been named as a drug dealer on posters placed around West Belfast.[294]
  • 8 December 1995: an alleged drug-dealer was killed by an IRA unit. He shot seven times in the back and head in south Belfast. The victim had previously served time in prison for handling stolen goods.[295]
  • 18 December 1995: an ex-IRA volunteer was shot in the knees and then the chest by IRA volunteers in north Belfast. It was stated during the inquest that he was killed as a result of a personal vendetta by individuals from within the Republican Movement.[296]

1996[edit]

February–April[edit]

  • 2 February 1996: the house of a part-time member of the RUC was riddled with gunfire in Moy, County Tyrone. A 'senior security source' claimed that the IRA was responsible, although the IRA later denied responsibility.[297]
  • 9 February 1996: the IRA ended its 1994 ceasefire with a massive lorry-bombing in East London adjacent to the South Quay DLR station in London Docklands. Two civilians (Inan Ul-Haq Bashir and John Jefferies) were killed in the bombing. The initial estimate of the damage caused was £85m.[298]
  • 15 February 1996: a bomb placed in a phone booth on the Charing Cross Road in London made safe using a controlled explosion.[26]
  • 18 February 1996: an improvised high explosive device detonated prematurely on a bus in Aldwych, in central London, killing Edward O'Brien, the IRA operative transporting the device and injuring 8 others.[299]
  • 9 March 1996: the IRA claimed responsibility for a small bomb which exploded on the Old Brompton Road in London.[300]
  • 31 March 1996: the IRA handed over £20,000 pounds of captured cannabis to a priest in Newry who then handed it over to the RUC. The IRA said they had captured it from a drug-dealer.[301]

June–December[edit]

1997[edit]

January–February[edit]

  • 1 January 1997: Two bombs containing approximately 500 lb (230 kg) of explosive were defused at Belfast Castle. It is believed that the IRA were responsible.[310][311]
  • 5 January 1997: A 250 lb (110 kg) bomb was defused near Cullyhanna, County Armagh. The IRA is believed to have been responsible.[310]
  • 6 January 1997: An RUC officer was injured when an IRA rocket hit a security hut at the Royal Courts of Justice in Belfast.[310][312]
  • 11 January 1997: RUC base in Tempo, County Fermanagh was mortared by the IRA.[310] Two mortar shells landed inside the base, one crashing through the building's roof, but both failed to detonate.[313]
  • 11 January 1997: a British Army post in Belfast was attacked by gunfire. The IRA is suspected.[313]
  • 13 January 1997: an IRA unit fired a horizontal mortar at a joint British Army/RUC patrol on Kennedy Way in Belfast. There were no injuries.[310][311]
  • 18 January 1997: an IRA unit fired two horizontal mortars at an armoured RUC patrol in Downpatrick, County Down. There were no injuries.[310][311]
  • 20 January 1997: an IRA unit hurled two explosive devices at a British armoured vehicle as it left Mountpottinger RUC barracks, County Antrim. There were no injuries.[311]
  • 27 January 1997: an IRA unit fired a rocket at an RUC Landrover in Toome, County Antrim.[310]
  • 29 January 1997: an IRA unit fired a rocket at a British Army patrol in West Belfast. The soldiers survived the attack.[314]
  • 5 February 1997: a grenade was thrown at an RUC Landrover at Kilwilkie estate, Lurgan. An IRA unit was spotted priming a mortar. About 100 families were evacuated from the nearby area.[315][316]
  • 6 February 1997: A rocket attack was carried out against an RUC patrol at Dungannon, County Tyrone. More than 40 families were evacuated in the aftermath.[316] The IRA later claimed responsibility.[317]
  • 7 February 1997: a gun attack took place on an unmarked van carrying British soldiers to Belfast airport.[315]
  • 10 February 1997: a massive landmine was discovered on the A5 motorway between Strabane and Omagh. The IRA said it was intended for a British patrol but the presence of civilians in the area forced them to disarm the device.[318]
  • 10 February 1997: a horizontal mortar fired by an IRA unit hit an RUC armoured vehicle leaving a security base. The ambush took place outside Pomeroy, County Tyrone. One RUC officer was injured.[318]
  • 12 February 1997: a British soldier was shot dead by a sniper near the British Army base in Bessbrook, County Armagh. Lance Bombardier Stephen Restorick was the last British soldier to be killed in Northern Ireland during Operation Banner.[319][320]
  • 22 February 1997: an IRA mortar unit was intercepted by the RUC in Caledon, County Tyrone, on its way to carry out an attack on a British security facility.[321] IRA sources claimed that a five-mile (8 km) chase followed before the IRA volunteers managed to escape on foot.[322]

March–April[edit]

  • 2 March 1997: a primed IRA mortar was discovered near Warrenpoint, County Down.[323]
  • 6 March 1997: the IRA detonated a large bomb on Glenalina Road, Belfast as a joint British Army/RUC patrol passed.[324]
  • 13 March 1997: a British soldier was injured by an IRA grenade in Ardoyne, Belfast. Several people was arrested in the aftermath.[325]
  • 13 March 1997: a British soldier and an RUC officer were injured in an IRA bomb attack in the Short Strand area of Belfast.[310][326]
  • 18 March 1997: The IRA launched a twin-tube mortar attack on an RUC mobile patrol at Downpatrick, County Down.[327]
  • 26 March 1997: the IRA carried out a double bomb attack on a mainline railway and signal box in Wilmslow, England. There was also a hoax bomb alert on the main Doncaster line. The attacks caused major and widespread railway and traffic disruption.[328]
  • 26 March 1997: a 1 kg home-made bomb was thrown by IRA volunteers to the Army/RUC base at Coalisland, County Tyrone. The device blew a hole in the perimeter fence. Undercover British soldiers shot and seriously injured 19 year-old republican Gareth Doris seconds later. The soldiers left the scene under the protection of the RUC after being cornered by a crowd and after firing shots in the air. Two women were wounded by plastic bullets fired by RUC officers (see 1997 Coalisland attack).[329]
  • 29 March 1997: an RUC officer was badly wounded when he was shot by a sniper outside Forkill joint security base, County Armagh.[330]
  • 3 April 1997: the discovery of two bombs on main motorways in England following coded warnings by the IRA resulted in widespread disruption.[331]
  • 6 April 1997: The British Grand National horse race at Aintree Racecourse was abandoned after the IRA warned that bombs had been planted in the area. No explosive devices were found.[331]
  • 9 April 1997: the IRA attacked two British border checkpoints near Rosslea, County Fermanagh. Both checkpoints were raked with automatic gunfire.[332]
  • 10 April 1996: a group of sixteen undercover SAS members restrained four IRA volunteers, part of one of the two sniper teams which operated in South Armagh and handed them over to the RUC, after tracking the IRA men to a farm complex. The owner of the farm was also arrested.[333]
  • 10 April 1997: a female RUC officer was shot and badly wounded by an IRA sniper in Derry City.[334]
  • 14 April 1997: a civilian went into hiding after he was badly beaten in an IRA punishment attack in Derry.[334]
  • 18 April 1997: a series of bombs and bomb alerts brought Britain's transport system to a halt and effectively cut all the main routes connecting England to Scotland. Bomb alerts closed large sections of the M6 motorway. a bomb exploded closing Leeds railway station while another bomb explosion at a rail bridge in Doncaster halted both rail and motorway traffic.[citation needed]
  • 21 April 1997: IRA bomb hoaxes almost entirely closed down London's transport links. King's Cross, St. Pancras, Charing Cross, Paddington, Baker Street and all three railway stations at Watford junction were evacuated due to bomb alerts. Soon after alerts closed Gatwick, Stansted and parts of Heathrow airports. By 9:00 am, at the height of the rush hour, London was 'gridlocked' with a ten-mile (16 km) jam on the M25.[citation needed]
  • 25 April 1997: two bombs planted by the IRA blew up next to M6 motorway in central England. A 132,000 volt electricity pylon was damaged.[335]
  • 29 April 1997: Britain's transport industry claimed minimum losses of £30 million after a series of IRA bomb alerts in southern England brought traffic to a standstill.[citation needed]

May–July[edit]

  • 31 May 1997: a massive IRA landmine was discovered in Poleglass, West Belfast. The IRA said the device was intended for a British patrol but claimed the attack was abandoned due to the proximity of civilians to the ambush site. The firing mechanism was disabled and a warning phoned in.[336]
  • 5 June 1997: the IRA carried out a gun attack on a British Army unit in Derry.[337]
  • 16 June 1997: two RUC officers (John Graham and David Johnston) were shot dead in an IRA ambush while on foot patrol in Lurgan, County Armagh. Both officers were shot at point blank range in the back of the head.[338][339]
  • 26 June 1997: an IRA unit fired a rocket propelled grenade at an RUC armoured patrol in north Belfast. The rocket bounced off the vehicle and exploded in an empty building.[340]
  • 5 July 1997: an IRA volunteer shot at an RUC armoured vehicle besides the local RUC base in Coalisland, County Tyrone, seriously wounding a female RUC officer.[341]
  • 6 July 1997: the IRA carried out a number of blast-bomb and gun attacks on the RUC across Belfast City in the course of fierce riots which erupted in nationalist areas after the Orange Order was allowed to march on Drumcree (see 1997 nationalist riots in Northern Ireland).[324]
  • 6 July 1997: a military base in West Belfast came under gun and grenade attack from an IRA unit. A Protestant teenager was shot in the shoulder.[341] Another Army base at the end of Lenadoon Avenue suffered a similar attack.[citation needed]
  • 7 July 1997: RUC forces received small arms fire at Armagh town amid widespread unrest, which included damage to local businesses and the beating of a Protestant teenager.[325]
  • 7 July 1997: a train near Lurgan, County Armagh, was boarded by seven IRA masked men and set on fire, destroying five carriages. In a crossing just 50 yards from the spot, eight men wearing combat jackets and balaklavas directed traffic for several hours.[342]
  • 8 July 1997: IRA gunmen beat off an attempt by British soldiers and RUC officers to regain control of the streets around a Catholic housing in North Belfast where rioters had erected barricades.[343]
  • 8 July 1997: a landmine was planted by the IRA near Dungannon, County Tyrone, where there was a bomb alert.[344]
  • 9 July 1997: IRA gunmen hijacked and burned a number of vehicles at Dungannon, County Tyrone.[345]
  • 11 July 1997: three British soldiers and two RUC officers were injured when the IRA launched a gun and bomb attack on their checkpoint in Oldpark, North Belfast.[346]
  • 12 July 1997: a Mark-15 mortar bomb was fired at Newtownhamilton British Army barracks, South Armagh. The shell exploded just outside the perimeter fence.[347]
  • 13 July 1997: the IRA claimed responsibility for shooting two men in the knees in Newry. They claimed the men were criminals who had been responsible for assaulting two members of Sinn Féin as well as stealing from local businesses.[348]
  • 19 July 1997: the IRA declared a second ceasefire. They state that: "We have ordered the unequivocal restoration of the ceasefire of August 1994. All IRA units have been instructed accordingly".[349][350]

September–December[edit]

  • 12 September 1997: four IRA volunteers stopped a member of the Continuity IRA (CIRA) in Ardoyne and confiscated his gun.[310]
  • October 1997: The Continuity IRA accused the IRA of destroying one of their bombs south of the border before it could be transported north.[351]
  • October 1997: an IRA volunteer assaulted and injured a Continuity IRA volunteer as he attempted to place a bomb in a bank in Derry City.[352]
  • 10 December 1997: Liam Averill, an IRA volunteer, escaped from the Maze Prison by dressing up as a woman and boarding a coach which was transporting prisoners' families.[310]

1998[edit]

  • 9 February 1998: a convicted drug-dealer (Brendan Campbell) was shot dead by the IRA on Lisburn Road, Belfast.[353][354]
  • 10 February 1998: The IRA was believed to be responsible for killing UDA member Bobby Dougan. Sinn Féin was temporarily excluded from peace talks as a result.[citation needed]
  • 19 July 1998: a civilian from New Lodge, Belfast (Andrew Kearney) was shot in the legs and died of his injuries. His family claimed he was killed by the IRA after he got the better of an IRA volunteer in a physical confrontation in North Belfast.[353][354]
  • 8 October 1998: the USA removed the Provisional IRA from its list of foreign terrorist organizations.[355]
  • 21 November 1998: Gerard Moran, an alleged drug dealer was shot dead by the IRA in Dublin.[356]

1999[edit]

  • 27 January 1999: a former IRA volunteer and RUC informant (Eamon Collins) was found dead near Newry, shortly after testifying against Thomas "Slab" Murphy, leader of the South Armagh Brigade in a libel case with the Sunday Times. Collins was badly beaten and had a spike pushed through his face.[357][358]
  • 9 May 1999: Brendan Fegan, a convicted drug dealer,[359] was shot dead by the IRA in Newry.[354][360]
  • 13 June 1999: Paul Downey, a drug dealer,[361] was kidnapped from a hotel in Newry by an IRA unit. He was shot in the head and his lifeless body dumped near Beleek.[354][360]
  • 17 June 1999: Double agent/former informant Martin McGartland was shot six times in a PIRA assassination attempt at his home in Tyneside, England. He survived despite serious injuries.[362][363]
  • 30 July 1999: Charles Bennett was shot in a punishment attack outside a GAA club in West Belfast. He died of his injuries a short time later. The IRA is believed to have been responsible.[354][360] It is believed he was suspected of stealing IRA weapons.[361]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Malcolm Sutton's Index of Deaths from the Conflict in Ireland: 1990. Conflict Archive on the Internet (CAIN).
  2. ^ a b McKittrick, David (1999). Lost lives. Mainstream, p. 1190; ISBN 1-84018-227-X
  3. ^ a b CIA document on events of 2 January 1990
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w "A Chronology of the Conflict - 1990". CAIN. 
  5. ^ a b c d e f Oppenheimer p. 87
  6. ^ a b c d O'Brien, Brendan (1999). The Long War: The IRA and Sinn Féin, Syracuse University Press, p. 207; ISBN 0-8156-0597-8
  7. ^ McKittrick, pp. 1191–92
  8. ^ McKittrick, p. 1192
  9. ^ "Ógra Shinn Féin Lead Commemoration for Charlie 'Cha' Love". Derrysinnfein.ie. 2010-01-26. 
  10. ^ Staff (12 February 1990). "Copter Forced Down in Ulster". NYTimes.com. 
  11. ^ Harnden, pp. 395-396
  12. ^ McKittrick, p. 1193
  13. ^ Jackson, Mike (2006).Operation Banner: An Analysis of Military Operations in Northern Ireland. MoD, Army Code 71842. Chapter 2, p. 16, item 247
  14. ^ Harnden, Toby (2001). Bandit Country. Hodder & Stoughton. p. 392. ISBN 0-340-71736-X. 
  15. ^ Cappagh (Incident) Parliamentary debate, 3 May 1990
  16. ^ Glasgow Evening Times, 26 March 1990.
  17. ^ "CAIN - Database of deaths - 1990". Retrieved 22 November 2014. 
  18. ^ McKittrick, p. 1194
  19. ^ CIA document
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  21. ^ McKittrick, pp. 1196–97
  22. ^ McKittrick, pp. 1197–1198
  23. ^ Wave of Bomb Attacks Hit Northern Ireland, Reuters, 29 April 1990
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  28. ^ McKittrick, p. 1200
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