Chrysler 300 non-letter series

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Chrysler 300
'71 Chrysler 300 (Orange Julep '10).jpg
1971 Chrysler 300
Overview
ManufacturerChrysler Corporation
Production1962–1971
AssemblyDetroit, Michigan, United States
Body and chassis
ClassFullsize car
Body style4-door sedan
4-door hardtop
2-door hardtop
2-door convertible
LayoutFR layout
RelatedImperial
Chrysler New Yorker
Chrysler Newport
Chronology
PredecessorChrysler 300 letter series
SuccessorChrysler Cordoba

The Chrysler 300 (Chrysler 300 Non-Letter Series) was a full-size automobile produced by Chrysler from 1962 until 1971. It was the replacement for the 1961 Chrysler Windsor, which itself filled the place in Chrysler's line previously occupied by the Saratoga just the year before that (1960). At the time, it was considered a luxurious "muscle car", with all the performance of the Dodge and Plymouth products of the time, but with the luxury features expected of the Chrysler name.

The 300 was positioned as a replacement of the 300 "letter series", adding 4-door versions and running alongside that model until its discontinuation in 1966. It became the sole 300 model until 1971, when production ended. The 300 name returned to the Chrysler line in 1979 as an option package on the Cordoba coupe.

1962–1964[edit]

Chrysler 300 1962–1964
63 Chrysler 300 Conv.jpg
1963 Chrysler 300
Overview
Production1962–1964
Body and chassis
Body style4-door sedan
4-door hardtop
2-door hardtop
2-door convertible
PlatformC-body
Powertrain
Engine383 cu in (6.3 L) B V8
413 cu in (6.8 L) RB V8[1][2]
Transmission3-speed automatic
3-speed manual
Dimensions
Wheelbase122 inches (3,100 mm)
Length215.3 inches (5,470 mm)
Width79 inches (2,000 mm)
Height55 inches (1,400 mm)
Curb weight3,970 pounds (1,800 kg) (4-door hardtop)[3]

The non-letter series was introduced in 1962; it expanded the letter series on the 4-door hardtop and 4-door sedan, adding 383 V8 as a choice (letter cars had 413 V8 as standard).[4]

1965–1968[edit]

Chrysler 300 1965–1968
'65 Chrysler 300 Non-Letter Convertible (Destination Décarie '12).JPG
1965 Chrysler 300 Convertible
Overview
Production1965–1968
Body and chassis
Body style4-door sedan
4-door hardtop
2-door hardtop
2-door convertible
PlatformC-body
Powertrain
Engine383 cu in (6.3 L) B V8
413 cu in (6.8 L) RB V8
440 cu in (7.2 L) RB V8[5]
Transmission3-speed automatic
4-speed manual
Dimensions
Wheelbase124 inches (3,100 mm)
Length218.2 inches (5,540 mm)
Width79.5 inches (2,020 mm)
Height54.9 inches (1,390 mm)
Curb weight4,390 pounds (1,990 kg) (4-door hardtop)[6]

In 1966, the Chrysler 300 letter series was discontinued, the 440 V8 replaced the 413 V8, and there was a mild facelift.[7]

1967 brought makeovers which changed front and rear styling extensively. The 4-door sedan was dropped from lineup (leaving the 4-door hardtop), the 440 V8 became standard and only available powerplant in two guises: base and more powerful TNT. 1968 facelifting brought concealed headlamps which were to be 300 trademark until 1971.[8]

1969–1971[edit]

Chrysler 300 1969–1971
1971 Chrysler Three Hundred - Flickr - denizen24 (1).jpg
1971 Chrysler 300
Overview
Production1969–1971
Body and chassis
Body style4-door hardtop
2-door hardtop
2-door convertible
PlatformC-body
Powertrain
Engine440 cu in (7.2 L) RB V8
440 cu in (7.2 L) TNT V8[9]
Transmission3-speed automatic
Dimensions
Wheelbase124 inches (3,100 mm)
Length224.7 inches (5,710 mm)
Width79.1 inches (2,010 mm)
Height55.6 inches (1,410 mm)
Curb weight4,320 pounds (1,960 kg) (4-door hardtop)[10]

1969 was first year for "fuselage styling", there were two engine options; 440 and 440 TNT.[11][12]

For 1970, taking a cue from Oldsmobile, a Hurst 300 was offered in Spinnaker White trimmed in Satin Tan with leather interior (pilfered from the Imperial), powered by a 375 hp (280 kW) 440 cu in (7.2 l) TNT V8, as a limited edition of 485.[13] The single convertible built used a standard Chrysler 300 white interior.

In 1971, the convertible was no longer offered, as Chrysler halted production of convertibles across the entire lineup in 1971.[14]

Engines[edit]

engine displacement, type, carburetor type max. motive power at rpm max. torque at rpm
440 cu in (7.2 L) RB V8 (1971) 4-barrel 335 bhp (250 kW; 340 PS) [220 bhp (164 kW; 223 PS)] @ 4,400 [4,000] 460 lb⋅ft (624 N⋅m) [350 lb⋅ft (475 N⋅m)] @ 3,200
440 cu in (7.2 L) RB V8 (1969–1970) 4-barrel 350 bhp (261 kW; 355 PS) @ 4,400 480 lb⋅ft (651 N⋅m) @ 2,800
440 cu in (7.2 L) TNT V8 (1971) 4-barrel 370 bhp (276 kW; 375 PS) [305 bhp (227 kW; 309 PS)] @ 4,600 480 lb⋅ft (651 N⋅m) [400 lb⋅ft (542 N⋅m)] @ 3,200
440 cu in (7.2 L) TNT V8 (1968–1970) 4-barrel 375 bhp (280 kW; 380 PS) @ 4,600 480 lb⋅ft (651 N⋅m) @ 3,200
[ ] denoting net figures [9][15]

1979[edit]

1979 Chrysler Cordoba with "300" option package

The 300 name returned to the Chrysler line in the spring of 1979; this time based on the Cordoba coupe. The 300 was a $2,040 option package featuring special emblems and traditional "cross-hair" 300-style grille.[16] It was available in Spinnaker White (perhaps 30 were painted Rallye Red) with a red-leather interior and red pin stripes. The model came with the code E58 195 hp (145 kW; 198 PS) 360 cu in (5.9 L) V8, featuring a four-barrel carburetor, a performance camshaft, and dual exhausts. Other features included police-spec suspension with 15"x7" wheels, heavy duty torsion bars/leaf springs/shocks, front and rear sway bars, and a 3.23 rear gear ratio. The deteriorating U.S. domestic economic conditions that led to the early 1980s recession reflected in low demand and less than 2,900 were built. The 300 model was planned for the 1980 model year using the new 2nd-generation Cordoba (based on the downsized Chrysler J platform), but was instead called the "LS".

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ History Of the Chrysler Three Hundred Series – 1962. Chrysler300site.com (2000-05-31). Retrieved on 2013-05-11.
  2. ^ History Of the Chrysler Three Hundred Series – 1964. Chrysler300site.com (1999-09-16). Retrieved on 2013-05-11.
  3. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2013-01-17. Retrieved 2012-06-10.CS1 maint: Archived copy as title (link)
  4. ^ Chrysler 300 History and Gallery. Chrysler300site.com (2000-05-31). Retrieved on 2013-05-11.
  5. ^ Chrysler 300 History and Gallery. Chrysler300site.com (2000-01-18). Retrieved on 2013-05-11.
  6. ^ "1965 Chrysler 300 4-Door Hardtop Firepower-315". Archived from the original on January 17, 2013. Retrieved June 10, 2012.
  7. ^ Chrysler C Bodies: The Big Guys. Allpar.com. Retrieved on 2013-05-11.
  8. ^ Chrysler 300 History and Gallery. Chrysler300site.com (1998-12-12). Retrieved on 2013-05-11.
  9. ^ a b "1971 Chrysler Features". Oldcarbrochures.com. p. 28. Retrieved 20 January 2014.
  10. ^ "1969 Chrysler Data Book". Oldcarbrochures.com. Retrieved 20 January 2014.
  11. ^ 1969 Chrysler. Fuselage.de. Retrieved on 2013-05-11.
  12. ^ Chrysler 300 History and Gallery. Chrysler300site.com (2001-02-18). Retrieved on 2013-05-11.
  13. ^ Flory, J. "Kelly", Jr. American Cars 1960–1972 (Jefferson, NC: McFarland & Coy, 2004), p.734.
  14. ^ Chrysler 300 History and Gallery. Chrysler300site.com (1998-12-12). Retrieved on 2013-05-11.
  15. ^ "1969 Chrysler Data Book". Oldcarbrochures.com. Retrieved 20 January 2014.
  16. ^ Auto Editors of Consumer Guide (16 July 2007). "1979-1982 Chrysler Cordoba 300/Cordoba LS". HowStuffWorks.com. Retrieved 20 January 2014.

External links[edit]