Church Commissioners

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Church Commissioners for England
PredecessorEcclesiastical Commissioners
Queen Anne's Bounty
Formation2 April 1948; 70 years ago (1948-04-02)
Legal statusRegistered charity
PurposeInvestment
HeadquartersChurch House, Westminster, London
Region served
England
Membership
33
Secretary and Chief Executive
Andrew Brown
First Church Estates Commissioner
Loretta Minghella
Second Church Estates Commissioner
Caroline Spelman MP
Third Church Estates Commissioner
Eve Poole
Parent organization
General Synod of the Church of England
Budget (2017)
GB£285,802,166
Staff
66
Websitewww.churchofengland.org/about/leadership-and-governance/church-commissioners
No. 1 Millbank, built for the Church Commissioners by W. D. Caroe (1903)

The Church Commissioners is a body managing the historic property assets of the Church of England. It was set up in 1948 combining the assets of Queen Anne's Bounty, a fund dating from 1704 for the relief of poor clergy, and of the Ecclesiastical Commissioners formed in 1836. The Church Commissioners are a registered charity regulated by the Charity Commission for England and Wales, and are liable for the payment of pensions to retired clergy whose pensions were accrued before 1998 (subsequent pensions are the responsibility of the Church of England Pensions Board.

The Secretary (and chief executive) of the Church Commissioners is Andrew Brown.

History[edit]

The Church Building Act 1818 granted money and established the Church Building Commission to build churches in the cities of the Industrial Revolution. These churches became known variously as Commissioners' churches, Waterloo churches or Million Act churches. The Church Building Commission became the Ecclesiastical Commissioners in 1836.

An earlier Ecclesiastical Duties and Revenues Commission had been set up under the first brief administration of Sir Robert Peel in 1835 with a wide remit, "to consider the State of the Established Church in England and Wales, with reference to Ecclesiastical Duties and Revenues" (Minutes of the Commission, 9/2/1835); this body redistributed wealth between the dioceses and changed diocesan boundaries, and the permanent Ecclesiastical Commission was formed the following year.

The Church Commissioners were established in 1948 following the passage, by National Assembly of the Church of England, of the Church Commissioners Measure 1947.[1]

The value of the commissioners' assets was around £5.5 billion as at the end of 2012.[2] By September 2016, it was valued at £7 billion.[3] The income is used for the payment of pensions to retired clergy whose pensions were accrued before 1998 (subsequent pensions are the responsibility of the Church of England Pensions Board.[4]

The commissioners also oversee pastoral reorganisation, the consent of the commissioners being required for establishing or dissolving team and group ministries, uniting, creating, or dissolving benefices and parishes, and the closing of consecrated church buildings and graveyards.

The Church Commissioners are now based at Church House, Westminster, London, having long occupied No. 1 Millbank.[5] However, the Millbank building was sold in 2005 to the House of Lords for accommodation of members and staff; the commissioners completed the move to Church House in 2007.[6] They used to be an exempt charity under English law, and is now a registered charity regulated by the Charity Commission for England and Wales.[7][8]

The Secretary (and chief executive) of the Church Commissioners is Andrew Brown.[9]

Responsibilities[edit]

The Church Commissioners have the following responsibilities:[10]

List of Church Commissioners[edit]

There are 33 Church Commissioners, of whom 27 make up the Board of Governors as the main policy-making body, with a further 6 who are Officers of State or Government ministers. Board Members are either elected by the General Synod of the Church of England, or appointed by either the Archbishop of Canterbury or the Crown.[4] The Board of Governors is composed of all of the commissioners apart from the First Lord of the Treasury, the Lord President of the Council, the Lord Chancellor, the Secretary of State for Culture, Media and Sport, the Speaker of the House of Commons, and the Lord Speaker.[1]

The 33 commissioners are as follows:[1][13]

Church Estates Commissioners[edit]

Church Estates Commissioners are three lay people who represent the Church Commissioners in the General Synod of the Church of England. The first and second commissioners are appointed by the British monarch, and the third commissioner is appointed by the Archbishop of Canterbury.[18] They are based at Church House, Westminster, having previously had offices at No. 1 Millbank, London.[19]

First Church Estates Commissioners[edit]

The First Church Estates Commissioner is appointed by the British Monarch.

Second Church Estates Commissioners[edit]

The Second Church Estates Commissioner is always a Member of Parliament appointed by the Monarch, and has additional duties as a link between the British Parliament and the Church.[27]

Third Church Estates Commissioners[edit]

The Third Church Estates Commissioner is appointed by the Archbishop of Canterbury.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Church Commissioners Measure 1947". www.legislation.gov.uk.
  2. ^ "Church Commissioners - The Church of England". www.cofe.anglican.org.
  3. ^ "Sir Andreas Whittam Smith to step down from Church Commissioners". Media Centre. Church of England. 29 September 2016. Retrieved 21 May 2017.
  4. ^ a b "How we are governed | The Church of England". The Church of England. Retrieved 2018-10-24.
  5. ^ Historic England. "Details from image database (418227)". Images of England. Retrieved 20 April 2015.
  6. ^ "Church Commissioners complete sale of Millbank site". www.churchofengland.org. The Church of England. 29 March 2005. Retrieved 17 August 2015.
  7. ^ "Exempt charities". GOV.UK.
  8. ^ Charity Commission. Church Commissioners for England, registered charity no. 1140097.
  9. ^ "About the Church Commissioners: Staff". Church of England. Retrieved 26 March 2018.
  10. ^ "Support | The Church of England". The Church of England. Retrieved 2018-10-24.
  11. ^ "What we fund | The Church of England". The Church of England. Retrieved 2018-10-24.
  12. ^ "Parish reorganisation | The Church of England". The Church of England. Retrieved 2018-10-24.
  13. ^ "About the Church Commissioners: Trustees". Church of England. Retrieved 26 March 2018.
  14. ^ "Archived copy". Archived from the original on 2014-02-02. Retrieved 2014-01-28.
  15. ^ "Church Commissioner Appointment: Loretta Minghella". GOV.UK. Retrieved 2018-10-27.
  16. ^ "Green Park supports appointment of First Church Estates Commissioner". Green Park. 2017-07-04. Retrieved 2018-10-27.
  17. ^ "Dr Eve Poole to be the next Third Church Estates Commissioner". www.churchtimes.co.uk. Retrieved 2018-10-27.
  18. ^ "Commissioners". Church of England. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  19. ^ "History". Church of England. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  20. ^ "WILBRAHAM, Sir Philip Wilbraham Baker". Who Was Who. Oxford University Press. April 2014. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  21. ^ "HARRIS, Sir Ronald (Montague Joseph)". Who Was Who. Oxford University Press. April 2014. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  22. ^ "LOVELOCK, Sir Douglas (Arthur)". Who Was Who. Oxford University Press. April 2016. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  23. ^ "COLMAN, Sir Michael (Jeremiah)". Who's Who 2017. Oxford University Press. November 2016. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  24. ^ "Warrants Under the Royal Sign Manual". thegazette.co.uk. The London Gazette. 9 January 2018. Retrieved 9 January 2018.
  25. ^ "Sir Andreas Whittam Smith to step down from Church Commissioners". Top News Releases. Xhurch of England. 29 September 2016. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  26. ^ "Church Commissioner Appointment: Loretta Minghella". GOV.UK. Prime Minister's Office, 10 Downing Street. 28 June 2017. Retrieved 28 June 2017.
  27. ^ "Second Church Estates Commissioner". Church of England. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  28. ^ "DENMAN, Hon. Sir Richard Douglas". Who Was Who. Oxford University Press. April 2014. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  29. ^ "MILLS, Col Sir John (Digby)". Who Was Who. Oxford University Press. April 2014. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  30. ^ "BURDEN, 1st Baron". Who Was Who. Oxford University Press. April 2014. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  31. ^ "ACLAND, Sir Richard Thomas Dyke". Who Was Who. Oxford University Press. April 2015. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  32. ^ "WORSLEY, Sir (William) Marcus (John)". Who Was Who. Oxford University Press. April 2016. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  33. ^ "van STRAUBENZEE, Sir William (Radcliffe)". Who Was Who. Oxford University Press. April 2014. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  34. ^ "TOVEY, 1st Baron". Who Was Who. Oxford University Press. April 2014. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  35. ^ "BROWN, Sir James (Raitt)". Who Was Who. Oxford University Press. April 2014. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  36. ^ "ASHTON, Sir Hubert". Who Was Who. Oxford University Press. April 2014. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  37. ^ "LAIRD, Margaret Heather". Who Was Who. Oxford University Press. April 2016. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  38. ^ "BRENTFORD, Viscountess,". Who's Who 2017. Oxford University Press. November 2016. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  39. ^ "WALKER, Timothy Edward Hanson". Who's Who 2017. Oxford University Press. November 2016. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  40. ^ "Appointment of Third Church Estates Commissioner". Top News Releases. Church of England. 27 December 2012. Retrieved 3 March 2017.
  41. ^ "Appointment of Third Church Estates Commissioner". The Church of England. 6 March 2018. Retrieved 15 March 2018.

External links[edit]