Church by the Bridge

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Church by the Bridge
Cbtblogo.png
33°50′47.74″S 151°12′46.59″E / 33.8465944°S 151.2129417°E / -33.8465944; 151.2129417Coordinates: 33°50′47.74″S 151°12′46.59″E / 33.8465944°S 151.2129417°E / -33.8465944; 151.2129417
Location Broughton Street (cnr Bligh Street), Kirribilli, Sydney, New South Wales
Country  Australia
Denomination Anglican Church of Australia
Churchmanship Evangelical
Website www.cbtb.org.au
History
Founded February 2005
Clergy
Pastor(s) Paul Dale (Senior Pastor)[1]

Church by the Bridge, Kirribilli and Lavender Bay is an Anglican Church on Sydney's Lower North Shore. Church by the Bridge meets at St John’s Anglican Church, Kirribilli and at McMahons Point.

A church plant of St Thomas' Anglican Church, North Sydney, North Sydney in February 2005,[1] the church offers six Bible-based services each Sunday 8am, 9:45am, 3.30pm, 5:30pm, 6.15pm and 7pm.

The purpose of Church by the Bridge is to both reunite people who have put their trust in God but haven't been attending church, and provide an opportunity for people who live in the area to listen to the Good News (Gospel).[2]

The congregation consists of around 400 people[1] from a wide variety of backgrounds, married, single and young families.

History[edit]

The Church of St John the Baptist was founded in 1884 within the Parish of Christ Church, Lavender Bay.[3] It subsequently became a parish in 1902.[3] The population of Milsons Point declined following commercial development of the area in the 1970s.

In 1983 a Chinese/Cantonese speaking congregation based in the Cathedral decided to join the congregation of St John's. The finances improved and arrears of assessments were paid.

The church was amalgamated with the Parish of Neutral Bay (St Augustine's) on 1 December 1989, and together they went by the name St John the Baptist Kirribilli.[3] The size of the Chinese congregation grew sufficiently to regain the church's status as an independent provisional parish.[3] In 1993 the congregation comprises approximately 10% local European residents and 90% Chinese from many parts of the Diocese.

In 2007 the Chinese (Cantonese) congregation moved to Artarmon, New South Wales. Bishop Glenn Davies invited Paul Dale to consider becoming curate in charge of St John’s.[3]

In March 2011 a new evening congregation was planted at Christ Church, Lavender Bay and in 2016 this congregation moved to St Peter's Presbyterian Church Hall at McMahons Point.

Buildings[edit]

St John the Baptist, Kirribilli

St John the Baptist, Kirribilli was designed by Edmund Blacket as a church school, in the Romanesque Revival style, and built in 1884.[4] A vestry and sanctuary were added in 1900.[4] The nearby kindergarten was built as a church hall in 1909.[4]

Ministry[edit]

The church runs "Carols Under The Bridge", located in Bradfield Park under the northern end of Sydney Harbour Bridge.[5][6]

Service Times[edit]

Kirribilli:
Sundays at 8am (Classic Anglican), 9:45am (families with Kids Church), 3.30pm (families with Kids Church), 5.30pm & 7pm

St Peter's Presbyterian Church hall (McMahons Point):
Sundays at 6.15pm

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Grimmond, Paul (1 September 2009). "Laying the foundations at Church by the Bridge". The Briefing. Matthias Media. Retrieved 13 March 2013. 
  2. ^ "Statement of faith", Church by the Bridge our belief.
  3. ^ a b c d e Davies, Glenn (24 August 2011). "Proposal to change the status of the provisional parish of Kirribilli to a parish" (PDF). Report of Standing Committee & Other Reports & Papers. Sydney Diocesan Synod. Retrieved 13 March 2013. 
  4. ^ a b c "St John’s Anglican Church, Kirribilli, Sydney, New South Wales". Medievalism in Australian Cultural Memory. Retrieved 13 March 2013. 
  5. ^ Allan, Rebecca (5 December 2012). "Come to the bridge for carols with Alicia". Mosman Daily. Retrieved 13 March 2013. 
  6. ^ Cowley, Rowan (1 December 2012). "Fun for kids at Church Under the Bridge's Christmas Carols". Mosman Daily. Retrieved 14 March 2013. 

External links[edit]