Church of All Hallows, Allerton

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Church of All Hallows, Allerton
Church of All Hallows, Allerton, from the west
Coordinates: 53°22′51″N 2°54′13″W / 53.3807°N 2.9035°W / 53.3807; -2.9035
OS grid reference SJ 400 875
Location Allerton, Liverpool
Country England
Denomination Anglican
Dedication All Hallows
Consecrated 1876
Associated people John Bibby
Status Parish church
Functional status Active
Heritage designation Grade I
Designated 28 June 1952
Architect(s) G. E. Grayson
Architectural type Church
Style Gothic Revival
Groundbreaking 1872
Completed 1876
Construction cost £20,000
Materials Red sandstone exterior
White Storeton stone interior
Deanery Liverpool South – Childwall
Archdeaconry Liverpool
Diocese Liverpool
Province York
Rector The Revd Alan Kennedy
Vicar(s) The Revd Nicola Milford

The Church of All Hallows is in Allerton, Liverpool, England. It is recorded in the National Heritage List for England as a designated Grade I listed building,[1] and is an active Anglican parish church in the diocese of Liverpool, the archdeaconry of Liverpool and the deanery of Liverpool South – Childwall.[2]


The church was built at the expense of John Bibby of the Bibby Line in memory of his first wife, at a cost of £20,000 (equivalent to £1,700,000 in 2015).[3] It was designed by G. E. Grayson. The foundation stone was laid on 31 October 1872, and the church was consecrated on 10 August 1876 by the Bishop of Chester.[4] During the Second World War the stained glass was removed to Slaidburn for safety and replaced by plain glass. This was destroyed in an air raid and the stained glass was returned in 1946.[5]



The church is built with red sandstone on its exterior and white stone from Storeton on the interior. The chancel is lined with square of red and green jasper, and the chancel steps and the base of the pulpit are in black Vaulsort marble. Its architectural style is Gothic Revival, with a mixture of Decorated and Perpendicular styles.[5] The tower is described as being a "mighty Perpendicular tower of the Somerset type".[6]


The finest feature of the church is its stained glass. Of the 15 windows, 14 were designed by Edward Burne-Jones, with some input from William Morris, and were made by Morris & Co.[5] Pollard and Pevsner consider that the west and east windows are the best.[6] The east window was made in 1875–86 and depicts the Adoration of the Lamb.[6] Burne-Jones also claimed that this was his finest piece of work.[5] The west window depicts the Four Evangelists. The window in the south transept was built in 1879 and depicts four holy men; Noah, Moses, Daniel and St Paul. In the north transept dating from 1880 are four holy women: Mary, the sister of Aaron, Ruth the Moabitess, Queen Esther and the Blessed Virgin. The north chancel windows followed in 1881; they depict angels and are memorials windows to John Bibby's children. The eight windows in the aisles were made between 1882 and 1886 and depict incidents from the life of Jesus.[5][6] The other window is at the east end of the north transept and was made by Heaton, Butler and Bayne.[6]

Also in the church are memorials to members of the Bibby family. One represents an earlier John Bibby who died in 1811. It is by William Spence and contains a standing figure of Hope. This memorial was moved from St Thomas' Church, Seaforth in 1978. Another memorial is to Mrs Bibby by Frederigo Fabiani.[6]

See also[edit]


  1. ^ Historic England, "Church of All Hallows, Liverpool (1068414)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 19 August 2012 
  2. ^ Deanery of Liverpool South – Childwall, The Diocese of Liverpool, retrieved 6 October 2008 
  3. ^ UK CPI inflation numbers based on data available from Gregory Clark (2016), "The Annual RPI and Average Earnings for Britain, 1209 to Present (New Series)" MeasuringWorth.
  4. ^ History, Parish of All Hallows, Allerton, retrieved 6 October 2008 
  5. ^ a b c d e The Building, The Parish of All Hallows, Allerton, retrieved 17 October 2008 
  6. ^ a b c d e f Pollard, Richard; Pevsner, Nikolaus (2006), The Buildings of England: Lancashire: Liverpool and the South-West, New Haven & London: Yale University Press, pp. 386–387, ISBN 0-300-10910-5