Church of Our Savior, Worcester

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Church of Our Saviour
Armenian Apostolic Church of Our Saviour
Armenian Church of Our Savior, Worcester.jpg
The current church building dates to 1952
42°16′00″N 71°48′00″W / 42.266667°N 71.8°W / 42.266667; -71.8Coordinates: 42°16′00″N 71°48′00″W / 42.266667°N 71.8°W / 42.266667; -71.8
LocationWorcester, Massachusetts
CountryUnited States
DenominationArmenian Apostolic
Websitewww.acoos.org
History
DedicatedJanuary 18, 1891 (1891-01-18)[1]

Church of Our Saviour (Armenian: Ուսթըրի Սուրբ Փրկիչ եկեղեցի) is an Armenian Apostolic church in Worcester, Massachusetts, known for being the first Armenian church in the Western hemisphere.

History[edit]

An early view of the church

The first Armenian church in the Western Hemisphere was built in Worcester in 1891.[2][3] Armenians from throughout the Northeastern United States contributed money to erect the first Armenian church in the area and in the country.[4][5][6] This original building was designed by Stephen C. Earle, a leading regional architect.[7]

The Armenian diocese of America was established in 1898. The first Armenian Evangelical Church was also built in Worcester in 1901.[8]

The original 1891 building was abandoned due to "various ongoing problems."[2] The current church building was constructed in a new location on Salisbury and Dean street in 1952.[2] The church was renovated extensively in 2005.[2]

The church in 1909

The 2002 book Memory fragments from the Armenian genocide claimed that "the construction of the small church gave the Armenians of Worcester a measure of respect from the larger community not previously given. One man recalled that his father was no longer beaten at the wire mill after the church was built."

The old church on Laurel Street was sold and is now the Russian Orthodox Church of the Holy Resurrection.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Blake, William D. (2011). This day in Christian history. Ulrichsville, Ohio: Barbour Pub. p. 18. ISBN 9781602606463.
  2. ^ a b c d McAfee, Andrew Bryce (December 2015). "Digital History Display: A Legacy for TheWorcester Armenian Community". Worcester Polytechnic Institute Digital WPI. Worcester Polytechnic Institute. Retrieved 10 July 2020.
  3. ^ "Diocesan History". The Armenian Church Eastern Diocese of America. The Armenian Church Eastern Diocese of America. Retrieved 10 July 2020.
  4. ^ "Holy Cross Cathedral I: History". Francesco Curá. Archived from the original on 1 October 2013. Retrieved 29 December 2012.
  5. ^ Laderman, Gary (2003). Religion and American cultures. Santa Barbara, California: ABC- CLIO. p. 302. ISBN 9781576072387.
  6. ^ Papazian, Dennis (2000). "Armenians in America". Journal of Eastern Christian Studies. University of Michigan-Dearborn. 52 (3–4): 311–347. doi:10.2143/JECS.52.3.565605. Archived from the original on 31 December 2007. Retrieved 25 November 2012.
  7. ^ Engineering and Building Record 2 Aug. 1890: 144. New York.
  8. ^ DiCanio, Margaret (2002). Memory fragments from the Armenian genocide: a mosaic of shared heritage. New York: Mystery and Suspense Press. p. 85. ISBN 9780595238651.