Cibolo Creek Ranch

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El Fortin del Cibolo Historic District
Cibolo Creek Ranch, Presidio County, Texas (2009).jpg
Nightfall at Cibolo Creek Ranch
El Fortin del Cibolo Historic District is located in Texas
El Fortin del Cibolo Historic District
El Fortin del Cibolo Historic District
El Fortin del Cibolo Historic District is located in the United States
El Fortin del Cibolo Historic District
El Fortin del Cibolo Historic District
Nearest cityShafter, Texas
Coordinates29°51′43″N 104°20′1″W / 29.86194°N 104.33361°W / 29.86194; -104.33361Coordinates: 29°51′43″N 104°20′1″W / 29.86194°N 104.33361°W / 29.86194; -104.33361
Area606.6 acres (245.5 ha)
Built1865 (1865)
Built byMilton Faver
MPSHistoric Resources Associated with Milton Faver, Agriculturist, MPS
NRHP reference #95000366[1]
Added to NRHPApril 6, 1995

Cibolo Creek Ranch is a historic place in Presidio County, Texas, United States. Established as a cattle ranch prior to the Civil War, it has been used in modern times for hunting and a shooting location for the movie industry. It includes a fort called El Fortin del Cibolo which has been renovated as a luxury hotel featuring watchtowers and three-foot-thick adobe walls.[2]

Location[edit]

The ranch is situated in the Chinati Mountains of the Chihuahuan Desert, near Shafter, Texas, approximately 15 miles (24 km) east of the Mexico–United States border.[3][4] It spans 30,000 acres (12,000 ha), and U.S. Route 67 passes through the property.[3]

The Cibolo Creek Ranch Airport is located 3.5 mi (5.6 km) northeast of the hotel.[5]

History[edit]

Fortin de la Cienega
Fortin de la Cienega is located in Texas
Fortin de la Cienega
Fortin de la Cienega
Fortin de la Cienega is located in the United States
Fortin de la Cienega
Fortin de la Cienega
Nearest cityShafter, Texas
Coordinates29°48′13″N 104°12′41″W / 29.80361°N 104.21139°W / 29.80361; -104.21139
Area9 acres (3.6 ha)
Built1854 (1854)
Built byMilton Faver
NRHP reference #76002059[1]
Added to NRHPOctober 8, 1976
La Morita Historic District
La Morita Historic District is located in Texas
La Morita Historic District
La Morita Historic District
La Morita Historic District is located in the United States
La Morita Historic District
La Morita Historic District
Nearest cityShafter, Texas
Coordinates29°46′51″N 104°15′16″W / 29.78083°N 104.25444°W / 29.78083; -104.25444
Area116.2 acres (47.0 ha)
Built1865 (1865)
Built byMilton Faver
MPSHistoric Resources Associated with Milton Faver, Agriculturist, MPS
NRHP reference #95000367[1]
Added to NRHPApril 6, 1995

Milton Faver established the ranch in the 1850s and built three adobe forts, called El Cibolo, La Cienega, and La Morita, for defense against the Apache people who refused to leave the land.[6][7] He raised 200,000 Texas Longhorn cattle.[3]

The ranch has been used by the movie industry since the 1950s. For example, Giant was shot on the ranch in 1956.[3] More recently, it was used as a shooting location for The Three Burials of Melquiades Estrada in 2005,[7] followed by There Will Be Blood and No Country for Old Men in 2007.[3]

The ranch was purchased by John B. Poindexter, the founder and chief executive officer of Houston-based manufacturing firm J.B. Poindexter & Co.[4][8] Poindexter turned the historic forts into luxury hotel rooms.[4] The grounds are used for big game and bird hunting. It hosted a gathering of members of the International Order of St. Hubertus in 2010.[9]

A wildfire spread across 1,700 acres of the ranch in 1994.[10]

The wedding of country music singer Charlie Robison and Dixie Chicks member Emily Robison was held at the ranch in May 1999.[11] Over the years, other notable guests have included Jerry Hall, Mick Jagger, Tommy Lee Jones, Randy Quaid, Julia Roberts, and Bruce Willis.[12]

U.S. Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia died at the ranch in 2016. Among his fellow guests at the ranch were members of the International Order of St. Hubertus, a male-only fraternity of hunters and wildlife conservationists.[13]

Cibolo Creek Ranch in 2008
Cibolo Creek Ranch in 2008

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c National Park Service (2010-07-09). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.
  2. ^ Parent, Laurence; Patoski, Joe Nick (2001). Texas Mountains. University of Texas Press. p. 69. ISBN 9780292765924.
  3. ^ a b c d e Abramson, Ben; Bacon, John (February 14, 2016). "Cibolo Creek Ranch: Wildlife, movie sets, luxury". USA Today. Retrieved February 14, 2016.
  4. ^ a b c Blinder, Alan; Fernandez, Manny (February 13, 2016). "Texas Ranch Where Scalia Died Is Rugged Oasis for the Famous". The New York Times. Retrieved February 14, 2016.
  5. ^ "Cibolo Creek Ranch Airport". Geographic Names Information System. United States Geological Survey.
  6. ^ Witynski, Karen; Carr, Joe P. (2001). Casa Adobe. Gibbs Smith. p. 140. ISBN 9781586850319.
  7. ^ a b Barnett, Tracy (November 19, 2006). "Cibolo Creek Ranch: A world-class ranch getaway, Cibolo Creek lives up to its reputation". San Antonio Express-News. Retrieved February 17, 2016.
  8. ^ "Company Overview of J.B. Poindexter & Co., Inc.: John B. Poindexter". Bloomberg Business. Retrieved February 15, 2016.
  9. ^ Viebeck, Elise (February 13, 2016). "Inside Cibolo Creek Ranch, the luxury resort where Scalia died". The Washington Post. Retrieved February 14, 2016.
  10. ^ "Fires under control in Presidio County". The Facts. Clute, Texas. July 10, 1994. p. 7. Retrieved February 16, 2016 – via Newspapers.com. (Registration required (help)).
  11. ^ "Dixie Chicks member weds in West Texas". The Kerrville Times. Kerrville, Texas. p. 16. Retrieved February 16, 2016 – via Newspapers.com. (Registration required (help)). Emily Erwin of the Texas-born group married fellow Texan and musician Charlie Robison on Saturday at Cibolo Creek Ranch in the Big Bend.
  12. ^ Edwards, Valerie (February 14, 2016). "Inside the luxury West Texas ranch where Scalia died, which is beloved by A-list celebrities (and Randy Quaid who ran up a $25,000 unpaid bill)". Daily Mail.
  13. ^ Brittain, Amy; Horwitz, Sari (February 24, 2016). "Justice Scalia Spent His Last Hours With Members of This Secretive Society of Elite Hunters". The Washington Post.

External links[edit]