City of Bankstown

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City of Bankstown
New South Wales
A map showing the location of the city of Bankstown local government area in metropolitan Sydney
Coordinates33°55′S 151°02′E / 33.917°S 151.033°E / -33.917; 151.033Coordinates: 33°55′S 151°02′E / 33.917°S 151.033°E / -33.917; 151.033
Population193,398 (2011 census)[1] (15th)
 • Density2,374/km2 (6,150/sq mi)
Established7 September 1895
Abolished12 May 2016 (2016-05-12)
Area76.8 km2 (29.7 sq mi)
Time zoneAEST (UTC+10)
 • Summer (DST)AEDT (UTC+11)
MayorKhal Asfour
Council seatBankstown
RegionInner West
South West
City of Bankstown Logo.jpg
WebsiteCity of Bankstown
LGAs around City of Bankstown:
Parramatta Auburn Strathfield
Fairfield City of Bankstown Canterbury
Liverpool Sutherland Hurstville

The City of Bankstown was a local government area in the south-west region of Sydney, Australia, centred on the suburb of Bankstown, from 1895 to 2016. The last Mayor of the City of Bankstown Council was Clr Khal Asfour, a member of the Labor Party.

A 2015 review of local government boundaries by the NSW Government Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal recommended that the City of Bankstown merge with the City of Canterbury to form a new council with an area of 110 square kilometres (42 sq mi) and support a population of approximately 351,000.[2] On 12 May 2016, the NSW Government announced that Bankstown would merge with the City of Canterbury to be known as the City of Canterbury-Bankstown.

Suburbs of the City of Bankstown[edit]

Suburbs and localities in the former local government area were:

Notes
  1. ^ with parts within the City of Parramatta
  2. ^ with parts within the City of Canterbury
  3. ^ with parts within the City of Auburn

History[edit]

The water tower, known as Bankstown Reservoir, is a heritage item managed by Sydney Water. In 1826, bushrangers were hanged on the site where the water tower now stands.

Early history and development[edit]

The traditional Aboriginal inhabitants of the land now known as the Canterbury-Bankstown were the Dharug (Darag, Daruk, Dharuk) and Eora peoples. Early indigenous groups relied upon the riparian network of the Georges River and Cooks River catchments towards Botany Bay, with extant reminders of this lifestyle dating back 3,000 years including rock and overhang paintings, stone scrapers, middens and axe grinding grooves.[3][4]

Following the arrival of Europeans in 1788, the new British settlers in the area burned oyster shells from the middens along Cooks River to produce lime for use in building mortar. The first incursions and eventual land grants in the area by Europeans led to increasing tensions, culminating in a confrontation between Europeans and a group of Aboriginal people led by Tedbury, the son of Pemulwuy, in what is now Punchbowl in 1809. However, following Tedbury's death in 1810, resistance to European settlement generally ended.[5]

The District of Bankstown was named by Governor Hunter in 1797 in honour of botanist Sir Joseph Banks. The area remained very rural until residential and suburban development followed the development of the Bankstown Railway Line with the passing of the Marrickville to Burwood Road Railway Act by the NSW Parliament in 1890, extending the rail line from Marrickville Station (later Sydenham Station) to Burwood Road (later Belmore Station) by 1895.[6] With the passing of the Belmore to Chapel Road Railway Act in 1906, the line was extended further to Lakemba, Punchbowl and Bankstown by 1909.[6] The railway formed an important part of the development of Bankstown, with rapid development following its construction – so much so that the commercial centre of Bankstown moved from its former position in Irish Town (Now Yagoona) on Liverpool Road to the vicinity of Bankstown railway station.

Establishment of Bankstown Council[edit]

In March 1895 a petition was submitted to the NSW Colonial Government by 109 residents of the Bankstown area, requesting the establishment of the "Municipal District of Bankstown" under the Municipalities Act, 1867.[7] The petition was subsequently accepted and the Municipal District of Bankstown was proclaimed by Lieutenant Governor Sir Frederick Darley on 7 September 1895.[8] The first six-member council, standing in one at-large constituency, was elected on 4 November 1895.[9] With the passing of the Local Government Act 1906, the council area became known as the Municipality of Bankstown.

Administration[edit]

On 13 December 1933, the Minister for Local Government Eric Spooner dismissed Bankstown council for the first time, which was also the first time the minister's power to dismiss a council was exercised under the Local Government Act, 1919. Spooner dismissed the council as a result of an inquiry into the council's awarding of a sanitary contract, which had recommended that the council seek further tenders for the contract as a result of an irregular and deficient original tender process, and that there was aclear implication that there had been undue influence involved in the awarding of the contract.[10] After the council refused to accept these findings, and resolved to award the contract as originally intended, Spooner dismissed the council the next day and appointed the inquiry commissioner, William Robert Wylie, Inspector of Local Government Accounts, as administrator until fresh elections could be held in December 1934.[11][12]

On 3 March 1954, the Minister for Local Government Jack Renshaw dismissed Bankstown council and appointed the Chief Inspector of Local Government, Henry William Dane, as administrator. Renshaw announced that the dismissal was due to the council being "not competent to discharge its responsibilities" after failing to act upon a report by the Department of Local Government that identified serious allegations of corruption and inappropriate acquisition methods for council materials by Council's assistant electrical engineer, who was later dismissed in July 1954 following an official inquiry.[13][14][15][16][17]

On 8 November 1963, Bankstown council was dismissed for the third time by the Minister for Local Government (Pat Hills), with Dane appointed for a second term as administrator, when five aldermen were charged with conspiracy to demand and receive payment in consideration of doing acts pertaining to aldermanic office.[18] It was alleged the aldermen William Thomas Delauney, Charles Henry Little, Georgen Allardice Johnstone, Alfred Frederick McGuren and Murt O'Brien, were involved in a conspiracy to seek £5,000 each for ensuring that a Lend Lease proposal for a shopping centre in Bankstown was approved.[19][20] On 7 April 1965, Delauney and another accused who was not an alderman, Martin Goode, pled guilty to the charges, while the remaining four went to trial at the District Court of New South Wales (prosecuted by John Slattery QC and presided over by Justice Christopher Monahan).[21] The Crown's case relied upon tape recordings of the accused, which the judge ruled as admissible despite an admission from the Crown that they had been illegally obtained.[22] On 13 April 1965, Justice Monahan acquitted McGuren and O'Brien on the basis that there was insufficient evidence to connect them to the conspiracy.[23] On 15 April 1965, Johnstone was acquitted and Little was found guilty, with Judge Monahan sentencing him, along with Delauney and Goode (who had pled guilty), to 12-months in prison.[24]

City status and later history[edit]

Bankstown's city status was proclaimed in 1980 in the presence of Queen Elizabeth II, becoming the "City of Bankstown".[25] On 12 May 2016, the City of Bankstown was merged with the City of Canterbury to form the Canterbury-Bankstown Council.

Council seats[edit]

Council Chambers (1918)[edit]

The second Council Chambers on South Terrace, Bankstown, was the council seat from 1918 to 1963.

On 29 June 1918 the new Council Chambers building located on South Terrace south of the Bankstown railway station (now No. 9 Bankstown City Plaza) was officially opened by the mayor, A. Townsend. Completed to a cost of £4,000, the new Council Chambers building was designed by prominent architect and mayor of Kogarah, Charles Herbert Halstead, and built by A. G. Swane. At the time of opening the street frontage included a post office, and a branch of the Australian Bank of Commerce.[26][27] This remained the Council's primary meeting place and offices until new offices in the Civic Centre to the north were completed in 1963.[28]

Civic Centre and Council Chambers (1963)[edit]

By the early 1960s, Bankstown Council sought a new headquarters that would be able to accommodate a growing organisation as well as provide a new 'civic centre' for the Council area. In 1961, the council commissioned a modernist design by architect Kevin Curtin, which envisaged a complex of an Administration Building, a Council Chamber roundhouse, and a Town Hall with the capacity for 1,500 people, to be located on a large block north of the Bankstown railway station between Chapel Road, Rickard Road, Appian Way and The Mall.[29][30][31] The Council Chambers was the first building completed and took the form of a roundhouse and was built by Monier Builders Pty Ltd, with the interior fittings and furniture designed by Maison Paul Pty Ltd of Greenacre, featuring timberwork in Queensland walnut timber (Endiandra palmerstonii).[29] The consulting engineers for the project were M. G. Bull (structural) and John R. Wallis, Spratt & Associates (electrical and mechanical).[29]

Administration Building[edit]

The Administration Building was officially opened on 2 December 1963.[28] It was built to house the majority of Council's staff and departments, and was a two-storey square block with an external colonnade and basement level for parking.[29] The rates, health & building, and Town Clerk's departments were located on the ground floor, while the upper floor contained the engineering and planning departments. The building's main lobby featured a mosaic mural by Michael Santry depicting the history of Bankstown, in addition to marble-clad columns, timber panelling, and terrazzo floors.[29] In 1964, the exterior lighting of the Civic Centre received an award for meritorious lighting from the Australian Illuminating Engineering Society.[28] In 1966 a new fountain, the "Dane Fountain", was unveiled outside the building to commemorate the service of H. W. Dane as administrator of the council.[28]

The 'Spirit of Botany' in its second location in front of Bankstown Town Hall.

On Tuesday 1 July 1997, a fire in the building, caused by a spark from maintenance works to bring the building up to modern standards, resulted in the complete destruction of the Administration Building, along with a large number of Council records and historical items.[32][33][34] With the Council offices relocated to the nearby Bankstown Civic Tower, the remains of the Administration Building were cleared and its site became the location for a new central park which was officially named Paul Keating Park on 13 June 2000.[35]

Spirit of Botany[edit]

In 1963, as part of the works to complete the new Bankstown Civic Centre, the council commissioned sculptor Alan Ingham to create a memorial statue to Sir Joseph Banks. Ingham accepted on the basis that he would create a statue that would be to the 'spirit of botany', a more abstract representation of Banks' work in the field, that would blend with the modernist style of the new Civic Centre: "It would be controversial and create far more interest than a statue of the man".[36] The cast aluminium statue was officially unveiled on 7 April 1964 atop a base of rocks.[29][37] When the Town Hall was completed in 1973, the statue was moved to the Town Hall forcourt as part of a fountain.[28] In 2012 as part of the Bankstown Library and Knowledge Centre project the statue was moved again to a more prominent location further south at the south-western corner of Paul Keating Park.[38]

The Bankstown Town Hall, pictured in 2010 before the right section was demolished in 2013 for the new library.

Town Hall[edit]

The final element of the Civic Centre to be completed was the Town Hall, designed as a theatre for 1,500 people, at the north-western end of the site. It was officially opened on 30 June 1973 by Prime Minister Gough Whitlam.[28] The Town Hall project was overseen by Civil and Civic (a Lendlease subsidiary).[39] In 2013, the Town Hall was upgraded and redeveloped as part of the Bankstown Library and Knowledge Centre project to become a 300-seat theatre named the "Bryan Brown Theatre", with the eastern side demolished and replaced by a new Library and "Knowledge Centre".[40][41][42]

Civic Tower[edit]

Bankstown Civic Tower, opened in 1990, was the primary offices of Bankstown council from 1997–2016. It is now the offices of the City of Canterbury Bankstown.

In 1989, Council commissioned a new 14-storey "Civic Tower" office building at 66-72 Rickard Road to accommodate additional Council staff, state government agencies, and rented office space. With construction beginning in 1990, the tower was complete by 1991. The Civic Tower became the primary Council offices from 1997–1999 following the destruction of the Administration Building.[33]

Demographics[edit]

At the 2011 Census, there were 182,352 people in the Bankstown local government area, of these 49.3% were male and 50.7% were female. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people made up 0.8% of the population. The median age of people in the City of Bankstown was 35 years, which is slightly lower than the national median of 37 years. Children aged 0 – 14 years made up 21.7% of the population and people aged 65 years and over made up 13.7% of the population. Of people in the area aged 15 years and over, 52.1% were married and 11.0% were either divorced or separated.[1]

Population growth in the City of Bankstown between the 2001 Census and the 2006 Census was 3.43%; and in the subsequent five years to the 2011 Census, population growth was 6.96%. When compared with total population growth of Australia for the same periods, being 5.78% and 8.32% respectively, population growth in Bankstown local government area was approximately 75% of the national average.[43] The median weekly income for residents within the City of Bankstown was slightly lower than the national average.[1][44]

At the 2011 Census, the proportion of residents in the Bankstown local government area who stated their ancestry as Lebanese, was in excess of eight times the national average. The proportion of residents who stated an affiliation with Islam was in excess of eleven times the national average. Meanwhile, as at the Census date, the area was linguistically diverse, with Arabic or Vietnamese languages spoken in 30% of households, both languages approximately seven times the national averages.[1]

Selected historical census data for Bankstown local government area
Census year 2001[43] 2006[44] 2011[1]
Population Estimated residents on Census night 164,841 170,489 182,352
LGA rank in terms of size within New South Wales 6th
% of New South Wales population 2.64%
% of Australian population 0.88% Decrease 0.86% Decrease 0.85%
Cultural and language diversity
Ancestry,
top responses
Australian 15.2%
Lebanese 14.9%
English 12.5%
Vietnamese 7.2%
Chinese 6.3%
Language,
top responses
(other than English)
Arabic 13.6% Increase 19.3% Increase 21.2%
Vietnamese 7.2% Increase 8.3% Increase 9.1%
Greek 4.1% Decrease 3.8% Decrease 3.6%
Cantonese 3.0% Increase 3.2% Steady 3.2%
Mandarin n/c Increase 1.9% Increase 2.3%
Religious affiliation
Religious affiliation,
top responses
Catholic 31.1% Decrease 29.6% Decrease 28.0%
Islam 11.9% Increase 15.2% Increase 19.1%
Anglican 15.5% Decrease 12.5% Decrease 10.2%
Eastern Orthodox 8.7% Decrease 8.6% Decrease 8.5%
No Religion 6.3% Increase 7.1% Increase 8.3%
Median weekly incomes
Personal income Median weekly personal income A$372 A$428
% of Australian median income 79.8% 74.2%
Family income Median weekly family income A$926 A$1,228
% of Australian median income 90.2% 82.9%
Household income Median weekly household income A$1,069 A$1,091
% of Australian median income 91.3% 88.4%

Council[edit]

Bankstown Council Chambers, designed in 1963 by Kevin J. Curtin & Partners, adjacent to Paul Keating Park in Bankstown, was the Council seat from 1963 to 2016. It is now the seat of the City of Canterbury Bankstown, and was the location of the first council meeting on 24 May 2016.

Final composition and election method[edit]

Bankstown City Council was composed of twelve Councillors elected proportionally as four separate wards, each electing three Councillors. All Councillors were elected for a fixed four-year term of office. The Mayor was elected by the Councillors at the first meeting of the Council. The most recent and last election was held on 8 September 2012, and the makeup of the Council prior to its abolition was as follows:[45][46][47][48]

Ward Councillor Party Notes
East Ward[45]   Khal Asfour Labor Mayor 2011–2014, 2015–2016[49][50][51][52][53] Deputy Mayor 2008–2011.[54][55][56]
  Naji Najjar Liberal
  Dan Nguyen Labor Deputy Mayor 2015–2016.[53]
North Ward[46]   Alex Kuskoff Labor
  Michael Tadros Liberal
  Jenny Golledge Labor
South Ward[47]   Jim Daniel Liberal
  Linda Downey Labor Mayor 2014–2015.[57]
  Scott Parker Independent Deputy Mayor 2012–2014.[51][52][58][59]
West Ward[48]   Glen Waud Liberal
  Ian Stromborg Labor
  Allan Winterbottom Labor Deputy Mayor 2011–2012, 2014–2015.[49][50][57]

Mayors and General Managers[edit]

Mayors[edit]

# Mayor Party Term Notes
1   Joseph James Cooper Independent 7 November 1895 – 11 June 1896 [60]
2   Ines Peter Miller Independent 11 June 1896 – 16 February 1899 [61][62][63]
3   Nicholas Goyen, Jnr Independent 16 February 1899 – 15 February 1900 [64]
4   William Gilliver Independent 15 February 1900 – 12 February 1903 [65]
5   Arthur Bransgrove Independent 12 February 1903 – 16 February 1905 [66]
6   William John Gibson Independent 16 February 1905 – 1 March 1908 [67]
7   William Henry Watson Independent 1 March 1908 – 28 February 1909 [68]
  William Gilliver Independent 1 March 1909 – 28 February 1911 [69]
  Arthur Bransgrove Independent 1 March 1911 – 28 February 1913 [70]
8   Frederick George White Independent 1 March 1913 – August 1913 [71]
9   John Arthur Hoskins Independent August 1913 – 8 February 1915 [72]
  William John Gibson Independent 8 February 1915 – July 1917 [73][74]
10   Alfred Townsend Independent July 1917 – 1917 [75][76]
11   James Hunter Lee Labor 1917 – February 1918 [75][77][78][79]
  Alfred Townsend Independent February 1918 – 4 February 1919 [75]
12   Cornelius Manahan Labor 4 February 1919 – February 1920 [75][80][81][82][83]
13   John George Graf February 1920 – 7 December 1920 [75][84]
14   David Kennedy 7 December 1920 – 6 December 1921 [75][85]
15   John Jensen 6 December 1921 – 5 December 1922 [75][86]
  David Kennedy 5 December 1922 – December 1923 [75][87]
16   Percy James George Coleman December 1923 – December 1924 [75]
17   Charles Edward Hercules Griffiths Independent December 1924 – December 1925 [88][89]
18   Michael Joseph Fitzpatrick Independent December 1925 – December 1926 [75]
19   Patrick John O'Neill Labor December 1926 – December 1927 [75]
20   William Mannell December 1927 – December 1928 [75][90][91]
21   Charles Arthur Welch Independent December 1928 – 3 December 1929 [75][92]
22   Patrick Clancy Labor 3 December 1929 – 8 December 1930 [93][94]
  Michael Joseph Fitzpatrick Independent 8 December 1930 – 7 January 1932 [95]
  Charles Edward Hercules Griffiths Independent 7 January 1932 – 5 December 1932 [96][97]
23   James Cragg Independent 5 December 1932 – 4 December 1933 [98][99]
  Charles Edward Hercules Griffiths Independent 4 December 1933 – 13 December 1933 [100]
William Robert Wylie (Administrator) 13 December 1933 – 1 December 1934 [101][102][103]
  James Cragg Reform 3 December 1934 – 2 December 1935 [104][105]
24   James Gosling 2 December 1935 – 13 December 1937 [106][107][108][109]
  Percy James George Coleman Labor 13 December 1937 – 11 December 1939 [75][110][111]
25   Thomas James Stevens 11 December 1939 – December 1940 [75][112][113]
  Charles Edward Hercules Griffiths Independent December 1940 – December 1941 [75]
26   A. H. Middleton Independent December 1941 – 24 December 1942 [75]
27   William Flood Labor 24 December 1942 – 9 December 1943 [75][114]
28   Stephen Everard Roberts Independent 9 December 1943 – December 1944 [75][115]
  Percy James George Coleman Labor December 1944 – 12 December 1946 [75]
29   Clarence Williams Independent 12 December 1946 – 4 December 1947 [75][116]
30   Arthur Henry Smith Independent 4 December 1947 – December 1949 [75][117][118]
31   Alfred James Johnston Independent December 1949 – 7 December 1950 [75]
32   Blanche Barkl Independent 7 December 1950 – 26 December 1951 [119][120][121][122]
33   Albert Edward Abel Labor 26 December 1951 – 15 December 1953 [75][123]
  Blanche Barkl Independent 15 December 1953 – 3 March 1954 [75][124][125][126]
Henry William Dane (Administrator) 3 March 1954 – 1 December 1956 [127][128][129]
34   Joseph McCann Independent December 1956 – December 1957 [75]
35   Charles Henry Little Independent December 1957 – December 1959 [75]
36   Murt O'Brien Independent December 1959 – December 1960 [75]
37   Douglas Burleigh Carruthers Independent December 1960 – December 1961 [75]
38   Joseph McCann Independent December 1961 – December 1962 [75]
  Douglas Burleigh Carruthers Independent December 1962 – 8 November 1963 [75][130]
Henry William Dane (Administrator) 8 November 1963 – 4 December 1965 [131][132]
39   Ron Lockwood Independent December 1965 – December 1967 [75]
  Douglas Burleigh Carruthers Independent December 1967 – December 1970 [75]
40   Frank McIlveen Independent December 1970 – September 1971 [75]
  Ron Lockwood Independent September 1971 – September 1977 [75]
41   Roger Bowman Labor September 1977 – September 1979 [75][133]
42   Ray McCormack September 1979 – September 1984 [75][134][135][136]
43   Gordon Parker Independent September 1984 – 21 June 1985 [75][137][59]
44   Max Parker Independent June 1985 – September 1985 [138][139][59]
45   Kevin Hill Labor September 1985 – September 1988 [75][140]
46   Ian Stromborg September 1988 – September 1991 [138][141][75]
47   Ray Buchanan September 1991 – September 1992 [138][75]
  Kevin Hill September 1992 – September 1993 [138][140][75]
48   Phil Lopez Independent September 1993 – September 1994 [138][142]
  Max Parker Independent September 1994 – September 1995 [138][143][139]
49   Grant Lee Labor September 1995 – September 1996 [138][144]
  Kevin Hill September 1996 – September 1998 [138][140]
  Ian Stromborg September 1998 – September 2000 [138][141]
  Kevin Hill September 2000 – September 2001 [138][140]
50   David Blake September 2001 – September 2002 [138]
51   Helen Westwood September 2002 – 1 September 2006 [138][145]
51   Tania Mihailuk 1 September 2006 – 27 June 2011 [146][147][138][54][55][56][148]
52   Khal Asfour 27 June 2011 – 16 September 2014 [49][50][51][52][138][57]
53   Linda Downey 16 September 2014 – 21 September 2015 [57][138]
  Khal Asfour 21 September 2015 – 12 May 2016 [53][138]

Town Clerk/General Managers[edit]

Town Clerk/General Manager[149] Term Notes
George Moss 7 November 1895 – 14 November 1895 [150]
Richard Peek 14 November 1895 – December 1906 [151]
Arthur R. Peek 30 March 1907 – 31 October 1912 [152][153][154]
Donald N. Morrison February 1913 – 24 July 1913 [155][156][157]
G. Thompson (acting) 28 January 1913 – 6 August 1913 [150][155]
John Glassop 6 August 1913 – November 1918 [158][159]
Lindsay S. Gibson November 1918 – 2 December 1921 [160][161][162]
W. G. Miller 1 January 1922 – 5 February 1929 [163][164][165]
Henry Emmett Harden 1929 – 23 March 1936 [166][167][168]
H. E. Maiden May 1936 – 1946 [150][169][170][171]
Cosmo Christopher Egan 1946 – 1958 [150]
Colin Gallimore Saunders 1958 – 1978 [150]
Arthur B. Heiler 1978 – 1994 [150][172]
Mark Fitzgibbon 1994 – 1999 [150]
Richard Colley 2000 – 2007 [150]
Wayne Carter 2007 – 2008 [150]
Klaus Kerzinger (acting) 2008 – 25 August 2009 [150]
Luke Nicholls 25 August 2009 – August 2011 [173]
Matthew Stewart August 2011 – 12 May 2016 [174][175][176]

Geography[edit]

The former Bankstown City region was approximately 76 square kilometres (29 sq mi) and had a population density of about 21.46 people per hectare.[177] The boundaries of the former Bankstown City were, clockwise, the Prospect water supply pipeline and Liverpool Road (also known as Hume Highway) along the north, Roberts Road, Juno Parade, Koala Road, Punchbowl Road, Canterbury Road and the Salt Pan Creek along the east, the Georges River in the south and the Georges River, Prospect Creek, the Hume Highway and Woodville Road along the west. Salt Pan Creek is a saltmarsh and mangrove swamp that extends from Canterbury Road to Georges River.

Parks[edit]

Bankstown had 293 parks covering 730 hectares (1,800 acres) within its city limits. There are 41 sports grounds, 12 community parks and 18 natural parklands.[178] In the CBD, major parks include Bankstown Oval, McLeod Reserve, Paul Keating Park and Bankstown City Gardens. Other major parks include Mirambeena Regional Park, The Crest, Middleton Park, O'Neill Park, Terry Lamb Complex, Garrison Point, Jensen Oval and the extensive parklands around Georges River, among others. The entrance to Georges River National Park is also located within the city.

The three-storey complex of Bankstown City Library, opened in 1983 and closed in 2013.

Paul Keating Park, in the centre of Bankstown, stands on the old site of the Council Administration building, which burned down in an accidental fire in 1997, and was named in 2000 for former prime minister and local MP for Blaxland, Paul Keating.[179] The Park is used for a variety of concerts and festivals, and is otherwise a large playing field.

Libraries[edit]

The Bankstown Library and Knowledge Centre next to the Town Hall, designed by Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp, was opened in 2013.

In 1946, Bankstown became the first municipality in Western Sydney to adopt the Library Act, 1939 by opening a Children's Library, located at Restwell Street. A central branch library was established on The Mall in Bankstown in 1954, followed by a mobile library service from 1955.[28] In 1958–1961, three more branch libraries were opened in Chester Hill, Greeacre and Padstow, followed by a branch in Panania in 1968.[28] The original Bankstown City Library was demolished in 1981 to make way for a much larger 2700sqm facility, which officially opened on 28 May 1983.[28][180]

In 2013, the Bankstown City Library was closed when the new "Bankstown Library and Knowledge Centre" next to the Town Hall was officially opened.[181] Designed by architects Francis-Jones Morehen Thorp (FJMT), the new library has been praised by the NSW Government Architect as a "reference for better design quality across the town centre" and as having "expanded the traditional idea of what a public library is, becoming a welcoming and socially engaging community hub".[182][183] In 2015 the design received the Australian Institute of Architects Emil Sodersten Award for Interior Architecture, the Australian Institute of Architects (NSW Chapter) John Verge Award for Interior Architecture and Commendation for Public Architecture.[182]

Sister cities[edit]

Sister Cities of Bankstown include:

  • Australia Broken Hill, a city in remote New South Wales. Bankstown signed its first Sister City Agreement with Broken Hill on 16 September 1986.[184]
  • Japan Suita, Osaka, Japan. Bankstown signed its first international Sister City agreement with Suita City, Japan, in March 1989.[184]
  • United States Colorado Springs, Colorado, United States. Colorado students in Bankstown signed a new Sister City Agreement with Colorado Springs, home of the United States Olympic Committee, on 13 July 2001.[184]
  • South Korea Yangcheon-gu City, Seoul, South Korea. In 1997, Bankstown signed a Friendship Agreement with Yangcheon-gu City in South Korea, resulting in the establishment of youth exchanges and the sharing of information between both local authorities. During a tour in 2001, Bankstown Council delegates met with Korean officials to discuss ways of promoting Bankstown companies with a view to creating new export markets. The Cities exchanged details of Management Planning Processes and inspections of community facilities took place in Yangcheon. A Sister City Agreement was subsequently signed with Yangcheon City in September 2002.[184]
  • China Shijiazhuang, Hebei, China. In February 2000 a friendship agreement was made between Shijiazhuang City and Bankstown. The friendship agreement signifies that the two cities are exploring the possibility of venturing into a sister city agreement.[185]

[edit]

In 1963, to coincide with the official opening of the new Bankstown Civic Centre, Bankstown Council adopted a new civic badge to serve as the primary visual symbol of the council.[186] It took the form of a royal blue and gold heraldic shield quartered into four fields by a white cross charged with a golden lion passant guardant from the Coat of Arms of New South Wales. The top left corner included a Southern Cross to represent Australia; A mace and mayoral chain in the top right corner to represent authority; A stork on an oak stump sprouting new branches in the bottom right corner and a fleur-de-lis in the bottom left corner are both taken from the coat of arms of Sir Joseph Banks, as are the blue and gold colours and white cross. A simple crown on top of the shield represents the monarchy of Queen Elizabeth II. The crest formed the primary logo of the Council until 1995 when a logo featuring the 'Spirit of Botany' statue was adopted, which remained in use until the Council's end in 2016.[186]

Arms of Sir Joseph Banks.jpg Crest of Bankstown City Council 1963.gif Bankstownhallfountain10072005.JPG Spirit of botany.JPG
The coat of arms of Sir Joseph Banks as granted in 1803. The 'crest' of Bankstown Council, as adopted in 1963. The 'Spirit of Botany' statue unveiled in 1964. The 'Spirit of Botany' logo adopted in 1995

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Australian Bureau of Statistics (30 June 2012). "2011 Census QuickStats: Bankstown (C)". Retrieved 26 June 2012.
  2. ^ "Merger proposal: Bankstown City Council, Canterbury City Council" (PDF). Government of New South Wales. January 2016. p. 7. Retrieved 28 February 2016.
  3. ^ "Aboriginal history and places of significance". City of Canterbury Bankstown. Retrieved 10 October 2021.
  4. ^ Muir, Lesley (2013). "Aboriginal people of the Cooks River valley". The Dictionary of Sydney. Retrieved 10 October 2021.
  5. ^ Irish, Paul (2017). "Aboriginal History along the Cooks River" (PDF). Cooks River Alliance. Retrieved 10 October 2021.
  6. ^ a b Larcombe, Frederick A. (1979). Change and Challenge: A History of the Municipality of Canterbury. Canterbury: Canterbury Municipal Council. pp. 194–198.
  7. ^ "BANKSTOWN.—PETITION FOR A MUNICIPALITY". New South Wales Government Gazette. No. 203. 23 March 1895. p. 2021. Retrieved 19 November 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
  8. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation". New South Wales Government Gazette. No. 603. 9 September 1895. p. 5823. Retrieved 19 November 2016 – via National Library of Australia.
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  10. ^ "BANKSTOWN". The Sydney Morning Herald. New South Wales, Australia. 13 September 1933. p. 13. Retrieved 15 October 2021 – via National Library of Australia.
  11. ^ "COUNCIL DISMISSED". The Argus (Melbourne). Victoria, Australia. 14 December 1933. p. 10. Retrieved 15 October 2021 – via National Library of Australia.
  12. ^ "ADMINISTRATOR". The Sydney Morning Herald. New South Wales, Australia. 19 December 1934. p. 13. Retrieved 15 October 2021 – via National Library of Australia.
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External links[edit]