City of Broken Hill

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

City of Broken Hill
New South Wales
Australia-Map-NSW-LGA-BrokenHill.png
Coordinates31°57′S 141°27′E / 31.950°S 141.450°E / -31.950; 141.450Coordinates: 31°57′S 141°27′E / 31.950°S 141.450°E / -31.950; 141.450
Population17,708 (2016 census)[1]
 • Density104.2/km2 (270/sq mi)
Established22 September 1888
Area170 km2 (65.6 sq mi)
Time zoneAEST (UTC+9:30)
 • Summer (DST)AEDT (UTC+10:30)
MayorDarriea Turley
Council seatCouncil Chambers, Broken Hill
RegionFar West
CountyYancowinna
State electorate(s)Barwon
Federal Division(s)Parkes[2]
WebsiteCity of Broken Hill
LGAs around City of Broken Hill:
Unincorporated Far West
Unincorporated Far West City of Broken Hill Unincorporated Far West
Unincorporated Far West

The City of Broken Hill is a local government area in the Far West region of New South Wales, Australia. The area contains an isolated mining city, Broken Hill, located in the outback of New South Wales and is surrounded by the Unincorporated Far West Region. The City is located adjacent to the Silver City and Barrier Highways and the Broken Hill railway line.

The Mayor of the City of Broken Hill Council is Cr. Darriea Turley, a Country Labor politician.

Council history[edit]

The Broken Hill Town Hall, completed in 1890, was the council seat until 1968.

Following a petition submitted by residents to the Colonial Secretary on 2 May 1888, the Municipal District of Broken Hill was first incorporated on 22 September 1888.[3][4] The incorporation occurred during a typhoid epidemic, which killed 128 people, and the need for public health and water supply provisions was one of the main driving forces behind incorporation, and one of the biggest issues for the new municipality.[5][6] One contemporary report commented that "The town is in a terrible state owing to defective sanitary arrangements. People continue to leave by trains daily in hundreds in view of the impending drought."[7] As a consequence, in 1892 the private Broken Hill Water Supply Company completed construction on the Stephens Creek Reservoir, which provided the first reliable clean water supply to the town.[8][9]

The first council was divided into four wards: Burke, Wills, Sturt and King, each returning three aldermen, and the first election, conducted by Charles George Gibson as Returning Officer, was held at the Broken Hill Court House on 24 November 1888.[10][11] The ward system remained in place until early 1909 when the council requested that the state government abolish the wards and elect the aldermen proportionally, which was proclaimed on 24 May 1909.[12][13] By 1891 the population had passed 23,000, making Broken Hill the third largest town in New South Wales, and that number continued to grow, reaching 25,000 by 1897.[14][15] Civic improvements, spurred on by silver mining profits, continued during the 1890s with the construction of schools, a technical college, town hall, post offices and gaol. Timber and temporary structures gave way to brick and stone, the town's streets were paved and recreation reserves were planted with trees.[16][17][18] The council commissioned the Town Hall, designed in the Italianate style by Whittall & Wells of Adelaide, with the foundation stone laid by Sir Henry Parkes on 3 April 1890.[19][20][21] The hall was officially opened by the Governor of New South Wales, Lord Jersey, with the Governor of South Australia, Lord Kintore, in attendance, on 6 August 1891.[22][23]

The council was renamed the Municipality of Broken Hill following the passage of the Municipalities Act, 1897 on 6 December 1897. The council's population continue to grow in this period and by 1906, the council resolved to apply for City status, being able to fulfil the city conditions set in Local Government Act, 1906, and the City of Broken Hill was proclaimed on 17 July 1907, the only municipality to do so under the 1906 act.[24]

Later history[edit]

Following the release of the report of public inquiry that detailed ongoing infighting among councillors and their conflicts with staff and councillor interference in operational matters, on 10 January 2007 the council was dismissed by the Minister for Local Government, Kerry Hickey.[25] The elected council was replaced by a single Administrator, with the former Broken Hill General Manager, Ken Boyle, appointed.[26] Elections originally scheduled for September 2008 were deferred and the council remained under administration until a special election held on 5 December 2009.[27]

In 2015, Broken Hill became the first city in Australia to be included on the National Heritage List.[28][29][30]

Demography[edit]

Selected historical census data for Broken Hill local government area
Census year 2011[31] 2016[1]
Population Estimated residents on census night 18,517 Decrease 17,708
LGA rank in terms of size within New South Wales 72nd Steady 72nd
% of New South Wales population
% of Australian population
Cultural and language diversity
Ancestry,
top responses
English
Australian
Italian
Chinese
Irish
Language,
top responses
(other than English)
Italian
Mandarin
Cantonese
Korean
Greek
Religious affiliation
Religious affiliation,
top responses
Catholic
No religion
Anglican
Eastern Orthodox
Buddhism
Median weekly incomes
Personal income Median weekly personal income A$
% of Australian median income
Family income Median weekly family income
% of Australian median income
Household income Median weekly household income
% of Australian median income

Council[edit]

Broken Hill Administration Centre and Council Chambers has been the council seat since 1968.

Current composition and election method[edit]

Broken Hill City Council is composed of nine Councillors elected proportionally as a single ward. All Councillors are elected for a fixed four-year term of office. The Mayor is elected directly by a popular vote. The most recent election was held on 10 September 2016 and the makeup of the council is as follows:[32][33]

Party Councillors
  Independents and Unaligned 5
  Country Labor 5
Total 10

The current Council, elected in 2016, in order of election, is:[32][33]

Mayor Party Notes
  Darriea Turley AM Country Labor Mayor 2016–date, Deputy Mayor 1997–1998, 2001–2002, 2012–2014[34][35]
Councillor Party Notes
  Marion Browne Country Labor Deputy Mayor 2017–date
  Dave Gallagher APM Independent Deputy Mayor 2014–2017
  Tom Kennedy Independent
  Jim Nolan Country Labor
  Christine Adams Independent
  Bob Algate Independent
  Branko Licul Country Labor
  Ron Page Independent
  Maureen Clark Country Labor

Mayors[edit]

Mayor Party Term Notes
  Richard Piper Independent 3 December 1888 – 11 February 1889 [36][37][38]
  Zebina Lane Independent 11 February 1889 – 12 February 1890 [39][40][41]
  Thomas Coombe Independent 12 February 1890 – 10 February 1891 [42][43][44]
  George John Morgan Independent 10 February 1891 – 18 February 1892 [45][46]
  August Carl Töpperwien Independent 18 February 1892 – 16 February 1893 [47][48]
  Arthur Evans Martin Independent 16 February 1893 – 21 December 1893 [49][50][51]
  Dennis Creedon Independent 22 December 1893 – 16 February 1894 [52][53]
  Patrick McMahon Independent 16 February 1894 – 13 February 1895 [54][55]
  George Thomas Lambert Independent 13 February 1895 – 10 February 1896 [56]
  John Souter Independent 10 February 1896 – 10 February 1897 [57][58]
  Robert F. Holdsworth Independent 10 February 1897 – 14 February 1898 [59][60]
  George Strachan Independent 14 February 1898 – 21 February 1899 [61][62]
  John Dunstan Independent 21 February 1899 – 16 February 1900 [63][64]
  Jabez Wright Labor 16 February 1900 – 14 February 1901 [65][66]
William John Retallick 14 February 1901 – 13 February 1902 [67]
Thomas Jackson 13 February 1902 – 12 February 1903 [68]
  Alexander Hendry Independent 12 February 1903 – 12 February 1904 [69]
  John Henry Ivey Labor 12 February 1904 – 16 February 1905 [70]
Francis Richard Harvey 16 February 1905 – 16 February 1906 [71]
Thomas Ivey 16 February 1906 – 12 February 1907 [72]
Calvin Chester 12 February 1907 – 6 February 1908 [73]
John Henry Ivey 6 February 1908 – 9 February 1909 [74][75]
John Long 9 February 1909 – 14 February 1910 [76]
Francis Richard Harvey 14 February 1910 – 3 February 1911 [77]
Thomas Glover Marks 3 February 1911 – 5 March 1912 [78][79]
Bernard Brady 5 March 1912 – 1 March 1913 [80][81]
Thomas Francis Hynes 1 March 1913 – 5 February 1914 [82]
William Bernard Driscoll 5 February 1914 – 11 February 1915 [83]
George Wilson Carroll 11 February 1915 – 14 February 1916 [84]
William Bernard Driscoll 14 February 1916 – 12 July 1917 [85]
Thomas Francis Hynes 12 July 1917 – 28 February 1919 [86][87][88]
  John H. Wicks Independent 1 March 1919 – 23 December 1920 [89][90][91][92]
  S. R. Gray Independent 23 December 1920 – 22 December 1921 [93]
  John H. Wicks Independent 22 December 1921 – 18 December 1922 [94]
  Samuel Townsend Independent 18 December 1922 – December 1924 [95]
  Alfred Stanley Rawling Independent December 1924 – December 1925 [96]
  Richard Dennis Labor December 1925 – December 1928 [97][98]
  William Shoobridge Independent December 1928 – December 1929 [99][100][101]
  Richard Dennis Labor December 1929 – 17 December 1931 [102][103]
H. C. Cleeland 17 December 1931 – 21 December 1933 [104][105]
E. J. Barnes 21 December 1933 – 5 December 1937 [106][107][108]
George Lambert 16 December 1937 – 5 July 1939 [109][110][111]
Percy John Francis Rowe 18 July 1939 – 20 July 1948 [112][113][114]
Walter Riddiford 3 August 1948[115] – December 1962 [116][117]
George Dial December 1962 – September 1974
  Noel Hicks Independent September 1974 – September 1975 [118]
  Raymond Sawyers Independent September 1975 – September 1976
  Noel Hicks Independent September 1976 – September 1977
  Kevin Clarke Labor September 1977 – September 1980 [118]
Peter Black September 1980 – September 1999 [118]
  Ron Page Broken Hill First September 1999 – 10 January 2007 [119][120]
Ken Boyle (Administrator) 10 January 2007 – 5 December 2009 [121]
  Wincen Cuy Independent 5 December 2009 – 10 September 2016 [122][123]
  Darriea Turley AM Country Labor 10 September 2016 – date [124]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Broken Hill (C)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 7 July 2017. Edit this at Wikidata
  2. ^ "Profile of the electoral division of Parkes (NSW)". Australian Electoral Commission. 25 February 2016. Archived from the original on 1 July 2016. Retrieved 12 July 2016.
  3. ^ "BROKEN HILL.—PETITION FOR A MUNICIPALITY". New South Wales Government Gazette (279). New South Wales, Australia. 2 May 1888. p. 3123. Retrieved 30 May 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  4. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation". New South Wales Government Gazette (607). New South Wales, Australia. 24 September 1888. p. 6729. Retrieved 30 May 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  5. ^ "BROKEN HILL". South Australian Register. LIII (12, 918). South Australia. 9 April 1888. p. 5. Retrieved 30 May 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  6. ^ "Indignation at Broken Hill". Australian Town and Country Journal. XXXVIII (977). New South Wales, Australia. 29 September 1888. p. 14. Retrieved 30 May 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  7. ^ "Typhoid at Broken Hill". Evening News (6741). New South Wales, Australia. 28 December 1888. p. 5. Retrieved 30 May 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  8. ^ "BROKEN HILL". South Australian Register. LIII (13, 053). South Australia. 13 September 1888. p. 5. Retrieved 30 May 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  9. ^ "BROKEN HILL WATER SUPPLY UMBERUMBERKA WATERWORKS" (PDF). Engineers Australia. October 2008. Archived (PDF) from the original on 12 June 2018. Retrieved 30 May 2018.
  10. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation". New South Wales Government Gazette (668). New South Wales, Australia. 26 October 1888. p. 7507. Retrieved 30 May 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  11. ^ "Government Gazette Proclamations and Legislation". New South Wales Government Gazette (673). New South Wales, Australia. 26 October 1888. p. 7583. Retrieved 30 May 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  12. ^ "THE MUNICIPALITY. Proposed Abolition of Wards". Barrier Miner. XX (6385). New South Wales, Australia. 8 January 1909. p. 4. Retrieved 30 May 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  13. ^ "PROCLAMATION". Government Gazette Of The State Of New South Wales (66). New South Wales, Australia. 26 May 1909. p. 2795. Retrieved 30 May 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  14. ^ "The Population of Broken Hill". Barrier Miner. 3 (908). New South Wales, Australia. 14 February 1891. p. 2. Retrieved 30 May 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  15. ^ "THE BROKEN HILL REVIVAL". The Argus (15, 778). Victoria, Australia. 25 January 1897. p. 5. Retrieved 30 May 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  16. ^ "BROKEN HILL". Illustrated Australian News and Musical Times (419). Victoria, Australia. 1 April 1890. p. 19. Retrieved 30 May 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  17. ^ "The Silver Country". Australian Town And Country Journal. XLI (1093). New South Wales, Australia. 27 December 1890. p. 15. Retrieved 30 May 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  18. ^ "BROKEN HILL". The Express and Telegraph. XXVIII (8, 263). South Australia. 16 June 1891. p. 3. Retrieved 30 May 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  19. ^ "Broken Hill Town Hall". The Australian Star (683). New South Wales, Australia. 10 February 1890. p. 5. Retrieved 30 May 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  20. ^ "THE NEW TOWN HALL". The Sydney Morning Herald (16, 233). New South Wales, Australia. 4 April 1890. p. 8. Retrieved 30 May 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  21. ^ "The Broken Hill Town Hall". Barrier Miner. 3 (851). New South Wales, Australia. 8 December 1890. p. 2. Retrieved 30 May 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  22. ^ "The Governor at Broken Hill". Evening News (7548). New South Wales, Australia. 7 August 1891. p. 5. Retrieved 30 May 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  23. ^ "LORD JERSEY AT BROKEN HILL". South Australian Register. LVI (13, 957). South Australia. 7 August 1891. p. 5. Retrieved 30 May 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  24. ^ "Broken Hill Municipal District Council (1888-1897) / Municipality of Broken Hill (1897-1907) / City of Broken Hill (1907-1993 ) / Broken Hill City Council (1993- )". NSW State Archives and Records. NSW Government. Archived from the original on 29 May 2018. Retrieved 29 May 2018.
  25. ^ AAP (10 January 2007). "Broken Hill council sacked amid infighting". The Australian. Retrieved 29 May 2018.
  26. ^ "Administrator takes control of Broken Hill council meeting". ABC News. 1 February 2007. Archived from the original on 29 October 2016. Retrieved 29 May 2018.
  27. ^ "Broken Hill City Council election: 5 December 2009". New South Wales Electorial District. Archived from the original on 30 May 2018. Retrieved 29 May 2018.
  28. ^ Wainwright, Sofie (12 June 2017). "Broken Hill Council pushes for Australia's first world heritage city listing in outback NSW". ABC News. Archived from the original on 8 May 2018. Retrieved 29 May 2018.
  29. ^ Back, Alexandra; Coote, Gavin (20 January 2015). "Broken Hill becomes first Australian city to join National Heritage List after decade-long campaign". ABC News. Archived from the original on 25 January 2016. Retrieved 29 May 2018.
  30. ^ "National Heritage Places – City of Broken Hill". Department of the Environment. Archived from the original on 20 January 2015. Retrieved 20 January 2015.
  31. ^ Australian Bureau of Statistics (31 October 2012). "Broken Hill (C)". 2011 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 23 October 2012. Edit this at Wikidata
  32. ^ a b "The Council of the City of Broken Hill: Mayoral contest". Local Government Elections 2016. New South Wales Electoral Commission. 10 September 2016. Archived from the original on 29 May 2018. Retrieved 29 May 2018.
  33. ^ a b "The Council of the City of Broken Hill: Councillor contest". Local Government Elections 2016. New South Wales Electoral Commission. 10 September 2016. Archived from the original on 29 May 2018. Retrieved 29 May 2018.
  34. ^ Media notes Archived 22 March 2018 at the Wayback Machine., Member (AM) in the General Division of the Order of Australia (A-L), Australia Day 2018 Honours List, www.gg.gov.au
  35. ^ Boisvert, Eugene (27 September 2012). "Darriea Turley elected dep Mayor of Broken Hill". ABC News. Archived from the original on 31 October 2016. Retrieved 29 May 2018.
  36. ^ "A Leading Mining Manager". Australian Town and Country Journal. XXXVII (945). New South Wales, Australia. 18 February 1888. p. 24. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  37. ^ "ELECTION OF MAYOR FOR THE MUNICIPAL DISTRICT OF BROKEN HILL". New South Wales Government Gazette (781). New South Wales, Australia. 18 December 1888. p. 8983. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  38. ^ "THE WONDERS OF THE BARRIER". The Advertiser. XLV, (13, 820). South Australia. 3 February 1903. p. 5. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  39. ^ "BROKEN HILL". Evening Journal. XXI (5760). South Australia. 13 February 1889. p. 3. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  40. ^ Anne Porter, 'Lane, Zebina (1829–1906)', Australian Dictionary of Biography, National Centre of Biography, Australian National University, http://adb.anu.edu.au/biography/lane-zebina-7025/text12219 Archived 15 September 2018 at the Wayback Machine., published first in hardcopy 1983, accessed online 15 September 2018.
  41. ^ "MUNICIPALITY OF BROKEN HILL". New South Wales Government Gazette (114). New South Wales, Australia. 22 February 1889. p. 1444. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  42. ^ "MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS". The Australian Star (687). New South Wales, Australia. 14 February 1890. p. 2. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  43. ^ "MUNICIPALITY OF BROKEN HILL". New South Wales Government Gazette (97). New South Wales, Australia. 21 February 1890. p. 1582. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  44. ^ "The New Mayor". Barrier Miner. 2 (598). New South Wales, Australia. 14 February 1890. p. 2. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  45. ^ "MAYORS OF BROKEN HILL". The Advertiser. XXXIII (10085). South Australia. 13 February 1891. p. 6. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  46. ^ "MUNICIPALITY OF BROKEN HILL". New South Wales Government Gazette (113). New South Wales, Australia. 17 February 1891. p. 1393. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  47. ^ "MUNICIPALITY OF BROKEN HILL". New South Wales Government Gazette (137). New South Wales, Australia. 26 February 1892. p. 1680. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  48. ^ "ELECTION OF MAYOR AT BROKEN HILL". Yorke's Peninsula Advertiser. XX (1706). South Australia. 19 February 1892. p. 4. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  49. ^ "MUNICIPALITY OF BROKEN HILL". New South Wales Government Gazette (125). New South Wales, Australia. 24 February 1893. p. 1668. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  50. ^ "THE MAYOR'S POSITION". Barrier Miner. 6 (1788). New South Wales, Australia. 21 December 1893. p. 1. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  51. ^ "BROKEN HILL AFFAIRS". The Advertiser. XXXV (10713). South Australia. 17 February 1893. p. 5. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  52. ^ "THE MUNICIPAL COUNCIL". Barrier Miner. 6 (1790). New South Wales, Australia. 23 December 1893. p. 2. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  53. ^ "MUNICIPALITY OF BROKEN HILL". New South Wales Government Gazette (30). New South Wales, Australia. 12 January 1894. p. 280. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  54. ^ "THE MUNICIPAL COUNCIL". Barrier Miner. 6 (1836). New South Wales, Australia. 17 February 1894. p. 2. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  55. ^ "MUNICIPALITY OF BROKEN HILL". New South Wales Government Gazette (115). New South Wales, Australia. 23 February 1894. p. 1283. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  56. ^ "MUNICIPALITY OF BROKEN HILL". New South Wales Government Gazette (156). New South Wales, Australia. 5 March 1895. p. 1530. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  57. ^ "THE ELECTION OF MAYOR". Barrier Miner. 8 (2442). New South Wales, Australia. 11 February 1896. p. 2. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  58. ^ "MUNICIPALITY OF BROKEN HILL". New South Wales Government Gazette (136). New South Wales, Australia. 21 February 1896. p. 1336. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  59. ^ "MUNICIPALITY OF BROKEN HILL". New South Wales Government Gazette (154). New South Wales, Australia. 23 February 1897. p. 1381. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  60. ^ "THE ELECTION OF MAYOR". Barrier Miner. 9 (2750). New South Wales, Australia. 11 February 1897. p. 2. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  61. ^ "MUNICIPALITY OF BROKEN HILL". New South Wales Government Gazette (205). New South Wales, Australia. 8 March 1898. p. 1951. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  62. ^ "MAYORALTY OF BROKEN HILL". Evening Journal. XXX (8497). South Australia. 15 February 1898. p. 3 (ONE O'CLOCK EDITION). Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  63. ^ "MUNICIPALITY OF BROKEN HILL". New South Wales Government Gazette (175). New South Wales, Australia. 28 February 1899. p. 1729. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  64. ^ "BROKEN HILL COUNCIL". Evening News (9895). New South Wales, Australia. 22 February 1899. p. 3. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  65. ^ "MUNICIPALITY OF BROKEN HILL". New South Wales Government Gazette (200). New South Wales, Australia. 6 March 1900. p. 1900. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  66. ^ "Broken-hearted spurn Labor for a rebel with a cause". The Sydney Morning Herald. 29 March 2004. Archived from the original on 15 September 2018. Retrieved 15 September 2018.
  67. ^ "MUNICIPAL DISTRICT OF BROKEN HILL". Government Gazette Of The State Of New South Wales (145). New South Wales, Australia. 22 February 1901. p. 1427. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  68. ^ "MUNICIPALITY OF BROKEN HILL". Government Gazette Of The State Of New South Wales (153). New South Wales, Australia. 21 February 1902. p. 1502. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  69. ^ "MUNICIPAL DISTRICT OF BROKEN HILL". Government Gazette Of The State Of New South Wales (94). New South Wales, Australia. 20 February 1903. p. 1530. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  70. ^ "MUNICIPAL DISTRICT OF BROKEN HILL". Government Gazette Of The State Of New South Wales (99). New South Wales, Australia. 19 February 1904. p. 1505. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  71. ^ "MUNICIPAL DISTRICT OF BROKEN HILL". Government Gazette Of The State Of New South Wales (102). New South Wales, Australia. 24 February 1905. p. 1369. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  72. ^ "MUNICIPAL DISTRICT OF BROKEN HILL". Government Gazette Of The State Of New South Wales (103). New South Wales, Australia. 23 February 1906. p. 1323. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  73. ^ "MUNICIPALITY OF BROKEN HILL". Government Gazette Of The State Of New South Wales (25). New South Wales, Australia. 27 February 1907. p. 1437. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  74. ^ "MAYORAL ELECTIONS". The Daily Telegraph (8951). New South Wales, Australia. 7 February 1908. p. 8. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  75. ^ "MUNICIPALITY OF BROKEN HILL". Government Gazette Of The State Of New South Wales (22). New South Wales, Australia. 19 February 1908. p. 1146. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  76. ^ "BROKEN HILL'S MAYOR". The Sydney Morning Herald (22, 175). New South Wales, Australia. 10 February 1909. p. 10. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  77. ^ "BROKEN HILL MAYOR". The Age (17, 136). Victoria, Australia. 15 February 1910. p. 8. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  78. ^ "MUNICIPALITY OF BROKEN HILL". Government Gazette Of The State Of New South Wales (24). New South Wales, Australia. 22 February 1911. p. 1230. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  79. ^ "MAYOR OF BROKEN HILL". Newcastle Morning Herald and Miners' Advocate (11, 312). New South Wales, Australia. 6 February 1911. p. 5. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  80. ^ "NO MAYOR". The Sydney Morning Herald (23, 119). New South Wales, Australia. 16 February 1912. p. 7. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  81. ^ "BROKEN HILL MAYORALTY". Barrier Miner. XXV (7362). New South Wales, Australia. 6 March 1912. p. 8. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  82. ^ "THE NEW MAYOR". Barrier Miner. XXVI (7665). New South Wales, Australia. 1 March 1913. p. 4. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  83. ^ "BROKEN HILL'S NEW MAYOR". Barrier Miner. XXVI (7952). New South Wales, Australia. 6 February 1914. p. 3. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  84. ^ "THE NEW MAYOR". Barrier Miner. XXVII (8266). New South Wales, Australia. 12 February 1915. p. 3. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  85. ^ "ELECTION OF MAYOR". Barrier Miner. XXVIII (8577). New South Wales, Australia. 15 February 1916. p. 3. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  86. ^ "ELECTION OF MAYOR". Barrier Miner. XXX (9008). New South Wales, Australia. 10 July 1917. p. 2. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  87. ^ "MUNICIPAL COUNCIL". Barrier Miner. XXX (9011). New South Wales, Australia. 13 July 1917. p. 3. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  88. ^ "THE MAYORALTY". Barrier Miner. XXX (9191). New South Wales, Australia. 12 February 1918. p. 2. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  89. ^ "NEW MAYOR OF BROKEN HILL ELECTED WITHOUT OPPOSITION". Barrier Miner. XXXI (9500). New South Wales, Australia. 12 February 1919. p. 2. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  90. ^ "Broken Hill Mayor". The Land. IX (424). New South Wales, Australia. 7 March 1919. p. 6. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  91. ^ "BROKEN HILL COUNCIL". The Advertiser. LXI (18, 825). South Australia. 13 February 1919. p. 6. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  92. ^ "BROKEN HILL MAYORALTY". The Age (20247). Victoria, Australia. 18 February 1920. p. 9. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  93. ^ "BROKEN HILL COUNCIL". The Advertiser. LXIII (19408). South Australia. 25 December 1920. p. 6. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  94. ^ "AID. WICKS AGAIN CHOSEN AS MAYOR OF BROKEN HILL". Barrier Miner. XXXIV (10, 334). New South Wales, Australia. 23 December 1921. p. 2. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  95. ^ "ALD. TOWNSEND ELECTED MAYOR". Barrier Miner. XXXV (10, 638). New South Wales, Australia. 19 December 1922. p. 3. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  96. ^ "ALDERMAN A. S. RAWLING MAYOR FOR 1925". Barrier Miner. XXXVII (11, 258). New South Wales, Australia. 27 December 1924. p. 5. Retrieved 15 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  97. ^ "NEW MAYER SELECTED BY A.L.P.ASSEMBLY CHOICE FALLS ON ALD DENNIS SKETCH OF HIS CAREER". Barrier Miner. XXXVIII (11, 552). New South Wales, Australia. 10 December 1925. p. 3. Retrieved 2 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  98. ^ "ALDERMAN RICHARD DENNIS J.P." Sport. XVIII (917). South Australia. 13 April 1928. p. 28. Retrieved 2 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  99. ^ "LABOUR BEATEN". Observer. LXXXV (4, 459). South Australia. 8 December 1928. p. 48. Retrieved 2 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  100. ^ "No Title". News. XII (1, 722). South Australia. 21 January 1929. p. 6 (HOME EDITION). Retrieved 2 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  101. ^ "LABOUR WINS BROKEN HILL MUNICIPAL BY=ELECTION". Observer. LXXXVI (4, 489). South Australia. 6 July 1929. p. 34. Retrieved 2 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  102. ^ "FIFTH TERM AS MAYOR". News. XV (2, 301). South Australia. 1 December 1930. p. 7 (HOME EDITION). Retrieved 2 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  103. ^ "Municipal & Shire Elections Heavy Polling in Broken Hill". Barrier Miner. XLIV (13, 264). New South Wales, Australia. 7 December 1931. p. 1. Retrieved 2 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  104. ^ "NEW MAYOR TAKES OVER". Barrier Miner. XLIV (13, 274). New South Wales, Australia. 18 December 1931. p. 3. Retrieved 2 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  105. ^ "ELECTION OF MAYOR Ald. Cleeland is Re-elected". Barrier Miner. XLV (13, 586). New South Wales, Australia. 23 December 1932. p. 3. Retrieved 2 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  106. ^ "ALD. BARNES MAYOR Elected Last Night". Barrier Miner. XLVI (13, 862). New South Wales, Australia. 22 December 1933. p. 1. Retrieved 2 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  107. ^ "BROKEN HILL'S NEW MAYOR". Recorder (10, 839). South Australia. 26 December 1933. p. 4. Retrieved 2 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  108. ^ "LABOR SWEEPS POLL FOR BROKEN HILL CITY COUNCIL". Recorder (12, 062). South Australia. 6 December 1937. p. 1. Retrieved 2 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  109. ^ "ALD. LAMBERT NEW MAYOR". Barrier Miner. L (15, 064). New South Wales, Australia. 13 December 1937. p. 1. Retrieved 2 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  110. ^ "ALD. LAMBERT IS NEW MAYOR". Barrier Miner. L (15, 068). New South Wales, Australia. 17 December 1937. p. 4. Retrieved 2 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  111. ^ "MAYOR OF BROKEN HILL DIES". Daily News. 1 (186). New South Wales, Australia. 6 July 1939. p. 3. Retrieved 2 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  112. ^ "ALD. ROWE NEW MAYOR OF BROKEN HILL". Port Pirie Recorder (12, 567). South Australia. 22 July 1939. p. 3. Retrieved 2 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  113. ^ "DEATH OF ALD. ROWE, WHO SERVED 9 TERMS AS MAYOR". Barrier Miner. LXI (17, 601). New South Wales, Australia. 20 July 1948. p. 1. Retrieved 2 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  114. ^ "Death Of Mayor, Alderman P.J.F. Rowe". Barrier Daily Truth. XL (12, 612). New South Wales, Australia. 21 July 1948. p. 2. Retrieved 2 September 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  115. ^ Acting Mayor as Deputy Mayor since 20 July 1948.
  116. ^ "Ald. Riddiford To Be Mayor Of Broken Hill". Barrier Miner. LXI (17, 612). New South Wales, Australia. 2 August 1948. p. 6. Retrieved 29 May 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  117. ^ "Mayoral Ballot". Barrier Daily Truth. XL (12, 622). New South Wales, Australia. 2 August 1948. p. 3. Retrieved 29 May 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  118. ^ a b c Hagan, Jim (2006). People and Politics in Regional New South Wales: 1856 to the 1950s. New South Wales: Federation Press. pp. 300–301.
  119. ^ "Page names Broken Hill election team". ABC News. 21 January 2004. Archived from the original on 27 October 2016. Retrieved 29 May 2018.
  120. ^ Lewis, Daniel (29 March 2004). "Broken-hearted spurn Labor for a rebel with a cause". The Sydney Morning Herald. Archived from the original on 2 September 2006. Retrieved 5 June 2018.
  121. ^ "Former council leader dies in Canberra". ABC News. 18 August 2010. Archived from the original on 30 October 2016. Retrieved 29 May 2018.
  122. ^ Fraser, Daniel (10 December 2009). "New Mayor Elected". ABC Broken Hill. Retrieved 29 May 2018.
  123. ^ Green, Antony. "Broken Hill City Council". 2012 NSW Local Council Elections. ABC News. Archived from the original on 22 August 2014. Retrieved 29 May 2018.
  124. ^ Gooch, Declan (15 September 2016). "Outback NSW city of Broken Hill elects first female mayor after tight race". ABC Broken Hill. Archived from the original on 20 September 2016. Retrieved 29 May 2018.

External links[edit]