City of Newcastle

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

City of Newcastle
New South Wales
Newcastle, Australia aerial.jpg
Aerial view of Newcastle
City of Newcastle is located in Local government areas of New South Wales
City of Newcastle
City of Newcastle
Coordinates32°55.7′S 151°46.9′E / 32.9283°S 151.7817°E / -32.9283; 151.7817Coordinates: 32°55.7′S 151°46.9′E / 32.9283°S 151.7817°E / -32.9283; 151.7817
Population
 • Density862.2/km2 (2,233/sq mi)
Area187 km2 (72.2 sq mi)[3]
Time zoneAEST (UTC+10)
 • Summer (DST)AEDT (UTC+11)
Lord MayorNuatali Nelmes (Labor)[4]
Location162 km (101 mi) NNE of Sydney
Council seat282 King Street, Newcastle
RegionHunter[5]
CountyNorthumberland
State electorate(s)
Federal Division(s)
City of Newcastle Logo.jpg
WebsiteCity of Newcastle
LGAs around City of Newcastle:
Maitland Port Stephens Port Stephens
Cessnock City of Newcastle Tasman Sea
Lake Macquarie Lake Macquarie Tasman Sea

The City of Newcastle is a local government area in the Hunter region of New South Wales, Australia. The City of Newcastle incorporates much of the area of the Newcastle metropolitan area.

The Lord Mayor of City of Newcastle Council is Councillor Nuatali Nelmes, a Labor politician.[4] Nelmes was elected at a by-election on 15 November 2014 following the resignation of Jeff McCloy, the former Lord Mayor.[11]

History[edit]

Following the passing of the Municipalities Act 1858 by the New South Wales parliament, the Municipality of Newcastle was proclaimed on 7 June 1859. The new Municipality was divided into three wards - City, Macquarie, and Honeysuckle.[12] Eight years later, the Municipalities Act 1867 classified the Newcastle Municipality as a "Borough".[13]

The Greater Newcastle Act 1937 merged the City of Newcastle with 10 of its suburban municipalities to form the City of Greater Newcastle. The Act also transferred parts of the Lake Macquarie Shire and Tarro Shire to the new city.[14] The amalgamations and transfers took effect from 2 April 1938.[15]

The newly created City of Greater Newcastle was subsequently renamed to City of Newcastle on 23 March 1949.[16]

Municipality Date established Population[17]
1891 1901 1911 1921
Adamstown 31 December 1885 2,030 2,420 2,660 3,959
Carrington 28 March 1887 2,137 2,547 2,685 3,115
Hamilton 11 December 1871 4,844 6,124 7,908 14,196
Lambton 26 June 1871 3,436 3,159 2,796 3,691
Merewether 20 August 1885 4,399 4,547 4,151 5,908
New Lambton 1 August 1889 1,548 1,578 1,827 3,550
Stockton 12 October 1889 2,417 2,549 2,106 4,598
Wallsend 27 February 1874 6,945 6,997 6,007 6,446
Waratah 23 February 1871 2,718 3,080 4,419 12,192
Wickham 25 February 1871 6,582 7,752 8,434 12,151

Proposed amalgamation[edit]

After a 2015 review of local government boundaries by the NSW Government Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal found that Newcastle City Council was not "fit for the future", it was recommended that the City of Newcastle merge with Lake Macquarie City Council.[18] However, the Minister for Local Government subsequently proposed that Newcastle City Council instead merge with Port Stephens Council to form a new council with an area of 1,045 km2 (403 sq mi) and support a population of approximately 230,000.[19] The outcome of an independent review was completed by mid–2016. On 14 February 2017, the NSW Government announced it would not be proceeding with further regional council mergers, including the Newcastle City Council and Port Stephens Council merger.[20]

Demographics[edit]

At the 2011 census, there were 148,535 people in the City of Newcastle local government area, of these 49.2 per cent were male and 50.8 per cent were female. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people made up 2.6 per cent of the population, which was marginally higher than the national and state averages of 2.5 per cent. The median age of people in the City of Newcastle was 37 years, equal to the national median. Children aged 0 – 14 years made up 17.0 per cent of the population and people aged 65 years and over made up 15.4 per cent of the population. Of people in the area aged 15 years and over, 41.6 per cent were married and 12.6 per cent were either divorced or separated.[3]

Population growth in the City of Newcastle between the 2001 census and the 2006 census was 3.91 per cent; and in the subsequent five years to the 2011 census, population growth was 4.78 per cent. When compared with total population growth of Australia for the same periods, being 5.78 per cent and 8.32 per cent respectively, population growth in the City of Newcastle local government area was significantly lower than the national average.[21][22] The median weekly income for residents within the City of Newcastle was marginally lower than the national average.[3]

At the 2011 census, the proportion of residents in the City of Newcastle local government area who stated their ancestry as Australian or Anglo-Saxon exceeded 76 per cent of all residents (national average was 65.2 per cent). In excess of 56% of all residents in the City of Newcastle nominated a religious affiliation with Christianity at the 2011 census, which was slightly higher than the national average of 50.2 per cent. Meanwhile, as at the census date, compared to the national average, households in the City of Newcastle local government area had a significantly lower than average proportion (10.1 per cent) where two or more languages are spoken (national average was 20.4 per cent); and a significantly higher proportion (87.3 per cent) where English only was spoken at home (national average was 76.8 per cent).[3]

Selected historical census data for the City of Newcastle local government area
Census year 2001[21] 2006[22] 2011[3] 2016[1]
Population Estimated residents on Census night 136,413 141,753 148,535 155,411
LGA rank in terms of size within New South Wales 18th
% of New South Wales population 2.15% Decrease 2.08%
% of Australian population 0.73% Decrease 0.71% Decrease 0.69% Decrease 0.66%
Cultural and language diversity
Ancestry,
top responses
Australian 30.4%
English 29.2%
Irish 8.9%
Scottish 8.0%
German 2.9%
Language,
top responses
(other than English)
Macedonian 1.1% Decrease 0.9% Decrease 0.8%
Italian 0.9% Decrease 0.7% Steady 0.7%
Mandarin n/c Increase 0.4% Increase 0.6%
Greek 0.7% Steady 0.7% Decrease 0.6%
Arabic n/c Steady n/c Increase 0.4%
Religious affiliation
Religious affiliation,
top responses
Catholic 26.6% Decrease 26.1% Decrease 25.3%
No Religion 12.7% Increase 16.3% Increase 22.6%
Anglican 27.0% Decrease 25.0% Decrease 22.3%
Uniting Church 8.2% Decrease 7.0% Decrease 5.9%
Presbyterian and Reformed 4.1% Decrease 3.5% Decrease 3.2%
Median weekly incomes
Personal income Median weekly personal income A$409 A$563
% of Australian median income 87.8% Increase 97.6%
Family income Median weekly family income A$1,132 A$1,530
% of Australian median income 96.7% Increase 103.3%
Household income Median weekly household income A$885 A$1,165
% of Australian median income 86.2% Increase 94.4%

Council[edit]

Current composition and election method[edit]

Newcastle City Council is composed of thirteen Councillors, including the Lord Mayor, for a fixed four-year term of office. The Lord Mayor is directly elected while the twelve other Councillors are elected proportionally as four separate wards, each electing three Councillors. The most recent election was held on 8 September 2012.[11][23][24][25][26] The Lord Mayor elected at that time, Jeff McCloy, resigned in 2014, and a by-election for Lord Mayor was held on 15 November 2014. The current makeup of the Council, including the Lord Mayor, is as follows:

Party Councillors
  Labor Party 7
  Liberal Party 1
  Independents 4
  The Greens 1
Total 13

The current Council, elected in September 2017 in order of election by ward is:

Ward Councillor Party Notes
Lord Mayor   Nuatali Nelmes Labor [4]
Ward One[23]   Emma White Labor
  John MacKenzie Greens
  John Church Independent
Ward Two[24]   Carol Duncan Labor
  Kath Elliott Independent
  Brad Luke Liberal
Ward Three[25]   Declan Clausen Labor Deputy Lord Mayor of Newcastle from September 2017
  Andrea Rufo Independent
  Peta Winney-Baartz Labor
Ward Four[26]   Jason Dunn Labor
  Matthew Byrne Labor
  Allan Robinson Independent

Sister cities[edit]

Newcastle Council has sister city relations with the following cities:

City Prefecture/State Country Year
Ube  Yamaguchi  Japan 1980
Dubbo  New South Wales  Australia 1995
Arcadia  California  United States

References[edit]

  • Docherty, James (1977). The Second City: Social and Urban Change in Newcastle, New South Wales 1900 - c. 1929 (PDF) (Thesis). Australian National University. Retrieved 30 November 2018.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Newcastle (C)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 16 November 2017. Edit this at Wikidata
  2. ^ "3218.0 – Regional Population Growth, Australia, 2017-18". Australian Bureau of Statistics. 27 March 2019. Retrieved 27 March 2019. Estimated resident population (ERP) at 30 June 2018.
  3. ^ a b c d e Australian Bureau of Statistics (31 October 2012). "Newcastle (Local Government Area)". 2011 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 10 September 2012. Edit this at Wikidata
  4. ^ a b c "New mayor Labor's Nuatali Nelmes cruises to victory". Newcastle Herald. 15 November 2014. Retrieved 16 November 2014.
  5. ^ "Suburb Search – Local Council Boundaries – Hunter (HT) – Newcastle City Council". New South Wales Division of Local Government. Archived from the original on 26 March 2011. Retrieved 10 October 2012.
  6. ^ "Newcastle". New South Wales Electoral Commission. 24 September 2012. Retrieved 10 October 2012.
  7. ^ "Wallsend". New South Wales Electoral Commission. 24 September 2012. Retrieved 10 October 2012.
  8. ^ "Charlestown". New South Wales Electoral Commission. 24 September 2012. Retrieved 10 October 2012.
  9. ^ "Port Stephens". New South Wales Electoral Commission. 24 September 2012. Retrieved 10 October 2012.
  10. ^ "Newcastle". Australian Electoral Commission. 26 July 2012. Archived from the original on 21 May 2011. Retrieved 10 October 2012.
  11. ^ a b "Mayor Tally Sheet" (PDF). Newcastle City Council Election 2012. Australian Election Company. September 2012. Retrieved 3 October 2012.
  12. ^ "Municipality of Newcastle - Proclamation (105)". Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales. 8 June 1859. p. 1293. Retrieved 2 December 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  13. ^ Municipalities Act 1867 (NSW)
  14. ^ Greater Newcastle Act 1937 (NSW)
  15. ^ "Greater Newcastle Act 1937 - Proclamation (5)". Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales. 14 January 1938. p. 82. Retrieved 29 November 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  16. ^ "Local Government Act 1919 - Proclamation (55)". Government Gazette of the State of New South Wales. 1 April 1949. p. 990. Retrieved 29 November 2018 – via National Library of Australia.
  17. ^ Docherty, p. 299
  18. ^ "Four Hunter councils deemed 'unfit for future'". ABC News. 20 October 2015. Retrieved 13 March 2016.
  19. ^ "Merger proposal: Newcastle City Council, Port Stephens Council" (PDF). Government of New South Wales. January 2016. p. 8. Retrieved 13 March 2016.
  20. ^ "Stronger Councils Stronger Communities". Government of New South Wales. 14 February 2017. Retrieved 22 February 2017.
  21. ^ a b Australian Bureau of Statistics (9 March 2006). "Newcastle (C)". 2001 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 23 December 2013.
  22. ^ a b Australian Bureau of Statistics (25 October 2007). "Newcastle (C)". 2006 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 23 December 2013.
  23. ^ a b "Final Result in Order of Standing: Ward One" (PDF). Newcastle City Council Election 2012. Australian Election Company. 21 September 2012. p. 24. Retrieved 3 October 2012.
  24. ^ a b "Final Result in Order of Standing: Ward Two" (PDF). Newcastle City Council Election 2012. Australian Election Company. 21 September 2012. p. 24. Retrieved 3 October 2012.
  25. ^ a b "Final Result in Order of Standing: Ward Three" (PDF). Newcastle City Council Election 2012. Australian Election Company. 20 September 2012. p. 22. Retrieved 3 October 2012.
  26. ^ a b "Final Result in Order of Standing: Ward Four" (PDF). Newcastle City Council Election 2012. Australian Election Company. 21 September 2012. p. 24. Retrieved 3 October 2012.