City of Parramatta Council

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This article is about the local government area. For the locality, see Parramatta, New South Wales.
City of Parramatta Council
New South Wales
Coordinates 33°49′S 151°00′E / 33.817°S 151.000°E / -33.817; 151.000Coordinates: 33°49′S 151°00′E / 33.817°S 151.000°E / -33.817; 151.000
Population 215,725 (2011 census)[1]
 • Density 2,631/km2 (6,810/sq mi)
Established 12 May 2016 (2016-05-12)
Area 82 km2 (31.7 sq mi)
Time zone AEST (UTC+10)
 • Summer (DST) AEDT (UTC+11)
Administrator Amanda Chadwick
Council seat Parramatta
Region Metropolitan Sydney
State electorate(s)
Federal Division(s)
Website City of Parramatta Council
LGAs around City of Parramatta Council:
Blacktown The Hills Hornsby
Cumberland City of Parramatta Council Ryde
Cumberland Cumberland Canada Bay & Strathfield

The City of Parramatta Council, formerly known as Parramatta City Council, is a local government area in the western suburbs of Sydney, situated on the Cumberland Plain, approximately 25 kilometres (16 mi) west of the Sydney central business district, in the state of New South Wales, Australia.

The City occupies an area of 82 square kilometres (32 sq mi) with a population of 215,725 as at the 2011 Census. The City houses the Parramatta central business district, the second largest employment destination for the metropolitan area after the Sydney central business district.

The area was formed in 1861 as the Municipality of Parramatta, became The Borough of Parramatta in 1867, the City of Parramatta in 1938, and was reconsititued on 12 May 2016 as the City of Parramatta Council. In 1948 Ermington-Rydalmere, Dundas, Granville and Parramatta councils were amalgamated; and in 2016 parts of The Hills Shire, Auburn City, Holroyd City and Hornsby Shire were amalgamated with the former City of Parramatta to form the new City of Parramatta Council.[1]

The Administrator of the City of Parramatta Council is Amanda Chadwick, until the elections for councillors to take place on 9 September 2017.[1]

Suburbs in the local government area[edit]

Suburbs in the City of Parramatta Council are:[1]

Demographics[edit]

At the 2011 Census, there were 166,858 people in the former Parramatta local government area that comprised 61 square kilometres (24 sq mi), of these 50.1% were male and 49.9% were female. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people made up 0.8% of the population. The median age of people in the City of Parramatta was 33 years; notably below the national median of 37 years. Children aged 0 – 14 years made up 18.9% of the population and people aged 65 years and over made up 11.8% of the population. Of people in the area aged 15 years and over, 52.3% were married and 9.9% were either divorced or separated.[2]

Population growth in the City of Parramatta between the 2001 Census and the 2006 Census was 3.62% and in the subsequent five years to the 2011 Census, population growth was 12.50%. When compared with total population growth of Australia for the same periods, being 5.78% and 8.32% respectively, population growth in the Parramatta local government area was significantly higher than the national average.[3] The median weekly income for residents within the City of Parramatta was on with par with the national average.

At the 2011 Census, the Parramatta local government area was linguistically diverse, with a significantly higher than average proportion (52.5%) where two or more languages are spoken (national average was 20.4%); and a significantly lower proportion (43.4%) where English only was spoken at home (national average was 76.8%). The proportion of residents who stated a religious affiliation with Islam and Hinduism was in excess of four times and six times the national average respectively.[2][4]

Selected historical census data for Parramatta local government area
Census year 2001[3] 2006[4] 2011[2]
Population Estimated residents on Census night 143,143 148,323 166,858
LGA rank in terms of size within New South Wales 11th 11th
% of New South Wales population 2.41%
% of Australian population 0.76% Decrease 0.75% Increase 0.78%
Cultural and language diversity
Ancestry,
top responses
Australian 23.9% Decrease 22.9% Decrease 18.1%
English 21.8% Decrease 17.8% Decrease 16.8%
Chinese 9.4% Increase 11.2% Increase 13.0%
Lebanese 9.5% Increase 9.7% Decrease 9.5%
Indian 3.4% Increase 5.9% Increase 9.1%
Language,
top responses
(other than English)
Arabic 10.1% Increase 10.7% Decrease 10.3%
Mandarin 3.0% Increase 4.7% Increase 5.9%
Cantonese 4.6% Increase 5.0% Steady 5.0%
Korean 2.0% Increase 2.1% Increase 2.7%
Hindi 1.3% Increase 2.0% Increase 2.6%
Religious affiliation
Religious affiliation,
top responses
Catholic 27.1% Decrease 26.0% Decrease 23.4%
No religion 10.7% Increase 12.8% Increase 15.0%
Anglican 15.8% Decrease 12.9% Decrease 10.3%
Islam 7.0% Increase 8.2% Increase 9.7%
Hinduism 2.8% Increase 5.3% Increase 8.8%
Median weekly incomes
Personal income Median weekly personal income A$443 A$544
% of Australian median income 95.1% 94.3%
Family income Median weekly family income A$1,043 A$1,451
% of Australian median income 101.6% 98.0%
Household income Median weekly household income A$1,172 A$1,288
% of Australian median income 100.0% 104.4%

Council[edit]

Parramatta's historic Town Hall
City of Parramatta Sign, Pennant Hills Road, Carlingford

Since May 2016, the Council is managed by an Administrator, appointed by the Government of New South Wales. Once elected, the City of Parramatta Council will comprise fifteen Councillors elected proportionally in five wards with three Councillors in each ward. All Councillors are expected to be elected for a fixed four-year term of office with effect from 9 September 2017.[1]

Former composition and election method[edit]

The former Parramatta City Council was composed of fifteen Councillors elected proportionally as five separate wards, each electing three Councillors. All Councillors were elected for a fixed four-year term of office. The Lord Mayor was elected by the Councillors at the first meeting of the Council. The most recent and last election of the former Parramatta City Council was held on 8 September 2012, and the makeup of the former Council was as follows:[5][6][7][8][9]

Party Councillors
  Liberal Party of Australia 7
  Australian Labor Party 5
  Lorraine Wearne Independents 2
  Woodville Independents 1
Total 15

The last Council, elected in 2012 and abolished on 12 May 2016, in order of election by ward, was:

Ward Councillor Party Notes
Arthur Phillip Ward[5]   Bakous Makari Liberal Deputy Mayor
  Julia Finn Labor
  Andrew Wilson Lorraine Wearne Independents
Caroline Chisholm Ward[6]   Scott Lloyd Liberal
  Shahadat Chowdhury Labor
  Bob Dwyer Liberal
Elizabeth McArthur Ward[7]   John Chedid Liberal
  James Shaw Labor
  John Hugh Liberal
Lachlan Macquarie Ward[8]   Jean Pierre Abood Liberal
  Lorraine Wearne Lorraine Wearne Independents
  Pierre Esber Labor
Woodville Ward[9]   Steven Issa Liberal
  Paul Garrard Woodville Independents Mayor
  Glenn Elmore Labor

Amalgamation[edit]

A 2015 review of local government boundaries by the NSW Government Independent Pricing and Regulatory Tribunal recommended that the City of Parramatta merge with adjoining councils. The government considered two proposals. The first proposed a merger of parts of Auburn, Holroyd and Parramatta to form a new council with an area of 72 square kilometres (28 sq mi) and support a population of approximately 219,000.[10] The second proposed a merger of parts of Parramatta, Auburn, The Hills Shire, Hornsby Shire, and Holroyd to form a new council with an area of 82 square kilometres (32 sq mi) and support a population of approximately 215,725.[11] Following an independent review, on 12 May 2016 the Minister for Local Government announced that the merger of the former Parramatta City Council with the parts of The Hills Shire, Auburn City, Holroyd City and Hornsby Shire councils would proceed with immediate effect.[1] There are five wards within the City of Parramatta Council – Dundas, Epping, North Rocks, Parramatta and Rosehill.[12]

Sister cities[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "City of Parramatta Council". Stronger Councils. Government of New South Wales. 12 May 2016. Retrieved 15 May 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c Australian Bureau of Statistics (31 October 2012). "Parramatta (C)". 2011 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 8 December 2012. 
  3. ^ a b Australian Bureau of Statistics (9 March 2006). "Parramatta (C)". 2001 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 8 December 2012. 
  4. ^ a b Australian Bureau of Statistics (25 October 2007). "Parramatta (C)". 2006 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 8 December 2012. 
  5. ^ a b "Parramatta City Council - Arthur Phillip Ward". Local Government Elections 2012. Electoral Commission of New South Wales. 16 September 2012. Retrieved 22 September 2012. 
  6. ^ a b "Parramatta City Council - Caroline Chisholm Ward". Local Government Elections 2012. Electoral Commission of New South Wales. 16 September 2012. Retrieved 22 September 2012. 
  7. ^ a b "Parramatta City Council - Elizabeth McArthur Ward". Local Government Elections 2012. Electoral Commission of New South Wales. 16 September 2012. Retrieved 22 September 2012. 
  8. ^ a b "Parramatta City Council - Lachlan Macquarie Ward". Local Government Elections 2012. Electoral Commission of New South Wales. 16 September 2012. Retrieved 22 September 2012. 
  9. ^ a b "Parramatta City Council - Woodville Ward". Local Government Elections 2012. Electoral Commission of New South Wales. 16 September 2012. Retrieved 22 September 2012. 
  10. ^ "Merger proposal: Auburn City Council (part), Holroyd City Council (part), Parramatta City Council (part)" (PDF). Government of New South Wales. January 2016. p. 7. Retrieved 22 February 2016. 
  11. ^ "Merger proposal: Parramatta City Council (part), Auburn City Council (part), The Hills Shire Council (part), Hornsby Shire Council (part), Holroyd City Council (part)" (PDF). Government of New South Wales. January 2016. p. 8. Retrieved 22 February 2016. 
  12. ^ "Stronger Councils". Retrieved 23 June 2016. 
  13. ^ "Rama renews ties with Xiamen City". philstar.com. Retrieved 12 July 2014. 

External links[edit]