City of Rockhampton

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This article is about a former local government area. For the urban centre of Rockhampton, see Rockhampton, Queensland. For the new local government area, see Rockhampton Region.
City of Rockhampton
Queensland
Rockhampton LGA Qld.png
Location within Queensland
Population 59,943 (2006 census)[1]
 • Density 317.66/km2 (822.74/sq mi)
Established 1860
Area 188.7 km2 (72.9 sq mi)
Council seat Rockhampton
Region Central Queensland
RCCLarge.png
Website City of Rockhampton
LGAs around City of Rockhampton:
Livingstone Livingstone Livingstone
Fitzroy City of Rockhampton Livingstone
Fitzroy Fitzroy Fitzroy

The City of Rockhampton was a local government area in the Central Queensland region of Queensland, Australia, encompassing most of the suburban area of the regional city of Rockhampton. The city covered an area of 188.7 square kilometres (72.9 sq mi), and existed as a local government entity in various forms from 1860 until 2008, when it amalgamated with several other councils in the surrounding area to become the Rockhampton Region.

History[edit]

The Borough of Rockhampton was proclaimed as Queensland's fourth municipality (after Borough of Brisbane, Borough of Ipswich and Borough of Toowoomba) on 13 December 1860 under the Municipalities Act 1858,[2] a piece of New South Wales legislation inherited by Queensland when it became a separate colony in 1859. It held its first election on 26 February 1861 and its inaugural meeting on 1 March 1861. The municipality had an area of 13 km2 (5.0 sq mi) located on the south bank of the Fitzroy River and had a population of about 600. In 1864, the council was divided into three wards—Fitzroy, Archer and Leichhardt. A proposal to greatly expand its area southwards to include Gracemere and Bouldercombe was rejected in part due to opposition from influential squatters in the area.[3] It achieved a measure of autonomy in 1878 with the enactment of the Local Government Act.

On 11 November 1879, the Gogango Division was established as one of 74 divisions around Queensland under the Divisional Boards Act 1879. It covered an area of 16,239 km2 (6,270 sq mi) surrounding the municipality—an area significantly greater than the modern Rockhampton Regional Council covers. Capital and people came to the area in greater numbers after the discovery of gold in 1882 at Mount Morgan, about 20 kilometres (12 mi) south of Rockhampton.

A bridge was built spanning the Fitzroy River in 1882, and a year later in September 1883, the Borough of North Rockhampton was proclaimed. North Rockhampton had a somewhat unhappy 36-year existence—its small population and location opposite the stronger and wealthier Rockhampton borough made comparisons inevitable and development of its own identity almost impossible. In 1919, it was described as a "small and straggling hamlet". Nevertheless, it was able to get a loan to construct a Municipal Chambers in 1885, which was completed in December of that year. The town clerk's arrest for embezzlement in 1890 marked the beginning of a period of difficulties characterised by disputes with the surrounding Gogango Divisional Board over road construction, and internal conflict between members of council, in which the Queensland Government was often requested to intervene. It did not have a reliable water supply and at the time of its amalgamation was still trying to raise funds for a dam.[4]

Although a foundation stone was laid for a town hall in 1897, it was not until 1941 that the Rockhampton Town Hall was completed.[5]

With the passage of the Local Authorities Act 1902, Rockhampton became one of three former municipalities, alongside Brisbane and Townsville, to become a City on 31 March 1903, while North Rockhampton became the Town of North Rockhampton.

The State Government became concerned in 1918 after both the City of Rockhampton and Town of North Rockhampton councils proposed separate water infrastructure projects. On Saturday 25 January 1919, an amalgamation referendum held in North Rockhampton passed with 884 of the 1,029 votes cast in favour. On 15 March 1919, elections for the new four-ward council with 11 councillors took place, with their first meeting being held five days later. North Rockhampton Borough Chambers, located in Stapleton Park, Berserker, became a Main Roads office for about four decades, and eventually was restored and, since 1985, has been the home of Rockhampton and District Historical Society.[4]

Wards were abolished at some point and were not reintroduced until 1982, when the council was restructured with 10 divisions each electing one councillor, plus a mayor elected by the entire City. On 1 July 1984, the City grew northwards by annexing Parkhurst, where its water treatment facility was being constructed, from the Shire of Livingstone. The council tried on several occasions to expand further into the Livingstone and Fitzroy areas, but a referendum in Fitzroy on 9 February 1991 was opposed by 83% of valid votes cast.

On 15 March 2008, under the Local Government (Reform Implementation) Act 2007 passed by the Parliament of Queensland on 10 August 2007, the City of Rockhampton merged with the Shires of Livingstone, Fitzroy and Mount Morgan to form the Rockhampton Region.

Suburbs[edit]

The City of Rockhampton included the following settlements:

* - shared with the Shire of Livingstone

Population[edit]

Year Population
1933 29,369
1947 34,988
1954 40,670
1961 44,128
1966 46,083
1971 49,164
1976 51,133
1981 52,383
1986 56,742
1991 59,394
1996 59,732
2001 58,382
2006 59,943

Mayors[edit]

The mayors of Rockhampton were:

  • 1861 John Palmer [6][7]
  • 1862 P D Mansfield [6]
  • 1863 P D Mansfield and R McKelliget [6]
  • 1864 Richard McKelliget [6]
  • 1865 Edward Pike Livermor [6]
  • 1866 Robert Miller Hunter [6]
  • 1867 Robert Miller Hunter [6]
  • 1868 Robert Miller Hunter [6]
  • 1869 Robert Miller Hunter [6]
  • 1870 T Macdonald Paterson and C Scardon [6]
  • 1871 Edward Pike Livermore [6]
  • 1872 Edward Pike Livermore [6]
  • 1873 Edward Pike Livermore [6]
  • 1874 William Pattison [6]
  • 1875 John Macfarlane [6]
  • 1876 John Macfarlane [6]
  • 1877 William George Jackson [6]
  • 1878 William George Jackson [6]
  • 1879 Albreach Feez [6]
  • 1880 John Ferguson [6]
  • 1881 John Ferguson [6]
  • 1882 Robert Sharples [6]
  • 1883 John Ferguson [6]
  • 1884 James Williamson [6]
  • 1885 Jabet Wakefield [6]
  • 1886 Thomas Kelly [6]
  • 1887 Thomas Kelly [6]
  • 1888 Sidney Williams [6]
  • 1889 Sidney William [6]
  • 1890 Thomas Kay Hickson [6]
  • 1891 Frederick A Morgan [6]
  • 1892 Frederick A Morgan [6]
  • 1893 Frederick A Morgan [6]
  • 1894 High Fides [6]
  • 1895 Stewart Williamson Hartley [6]
  • 1896 W. Wilson Littler [6]
  • 1897 W. Wilson Littler [5][6]
  • 1896 Hugh Fiddes [6]
  • 1899 Hugh Fiddes [6]
  • 1900 Thomas Pennington [6] or R. Tallon [8]
  • 1901 Henry W. Johnson [6]
  • 1902 S. Thomasson [6]
  • 1903 Thomas Henderson [6]
  • 1904 Arthur H Parnell [6]
  • 1905 Harry Medcraf [6]
  • 1906 Thomas Connolly [6][9]
  • 1907 Arthur H. Parnell [6]
  • 1908 Harry Medcraf [6]
  • 1909 John Edgar [6]
  • 1910 George Wilkinson [6]
  • 1911 Harry Medcraf [6]
  • 1912 Arthur H. Parnell [6]
  • 1913 Thomas B. Renshaw [6]
  • 1914 William Farrell [6]
  • 1915 Theo W. Kingel and John Morrison [6]
  • 1916 John Morrison [6]
  • 1917 Theo W. Kingel [6]
  • 1918 Charles Oliver Gough [6]
  • 1919 Theo W. Kingel [6]
  • 1920 Robert Elliott Hartley [6]
  • 1921 William Charlton [6]
  • 1922 William Charlton [6]
  • 1923 William Charlton [6]
  • 1924 Theodor William Kingel [6]
  • 1925 Theodor William Kingel [6]
  • 1926. Theodor William Kingel [6]
  • 1927. Thomas Dunlop [6]
  • 1928. Thomas Dunlop [6]
  • 1929. Thomas Dunlop [6][10]
  • 1930. J. J. Jeffries, Robert Cousins [6]
  • 1930-35 Thomas Joseph Lee [6]
  • 1936-43 Robert William Evans [5][6]
  • 1943-52 Henry H. Jeffries [5][6]
  • 1952-1982 Rex Pilbeam [6]
  • 1982-1991 Jim Webber [11]
  • 1991-1997 Lea Taylor
  • 1997– 2000 Jim McRae
  • 2000–2008: Margaret Strelow

References[edit]

  1. ^ Australian Bureau of Statistics (25 October 2007). "Rockhampton (C) (Local Government Area)". 2006 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 18 March 2008. 
  2. ^ 22 Vic No. 13 (Imp), assented 27 October 1858
  3. ^ McDonald, Lorna (1995). Rockhampton : a history of city and district. Rockhampton City Council. pp. 108–109. ISBN 0-9599897-3-0. 
  4. ^ a b "North Rockhampton Borough Chambers (entry 601370)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 20 April 2008. 
  5. ^ a b c d "Rockhampton Town Hall (entry 601572)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 1 August 2014. 
  6. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac ad ae af ag ah ai aj ak al am an ao ap aq ar as at au av aw ax ay az ba bb bc bd be bf bg bh bi bj bk bl bm bn bo bp bq br bs bt bu bv "Central Queensland History Wiki - Institutions - RockhamptonMunicipalCouncil". www.cqhistory.com. Retrieved 2015-12-20. 
  7. ^ "St Andrew's Presbyterian Church (entry 600785)". Queensland Heritage Register. Queensland Heritage Council. Retrieved 1 August 2014. 
  8. ^ Consolidated Index to Queensland Government Gazette 1859–1919. Queensland Family History Society. 2004. ISBN 1 876613 79 3. 
  9. ^ "Queensland Mayors and Shire Chairmen.". The Queenslander (Brisbane, Qld. : 1866 - 1939). Brisbane, Qld.: National Library of Australia. 24 February 1906. p. 22. Retrieved 1 October 2015. 
  10. ^ "MAYOR AND MAYORESS.". Morning Bulletin (Rockhampton, Qld. : 1878 - 1954). Rockhampton, Qld.: National Library of Australia. 24 June 1929. p. 8. Retrieved 21 November 2015. 
  11. ^ Unidentified (1985), Portrait of Jim Webber, Rockhampton, Queensland, ca. 1985, John Oxley Library, State Library of Queensland, retrieved 12 December 2015