Clackamas Town Center

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Clackamas Town Center
Clackamas Town Center - SE quadrant.jpg
LocationClackamas, Oregon, USA[a] 45°26′10″N 122°34′26″W / 45.436°N 122.574°W / 45.436; -122.574Coordinates: 45°26′10″N 122°34′26″W / 45.436°N 122.574°W / 45.436; -122.574
Opening dateMarch 6, 1981[2]
DeveloperThe Hahn Company
ManagementBrookfield Properties Retail Group
OwnerBrookfield Properties Retail Group
No. of stores and services185[3]
No. of anchor tenants4
Total retail floor area1,230,000 sq ft (114,000 m2)[3]
No. of floors2
Parking6,800[3]
Websitewww.clackamastowncenter.com

Clackamas Town Center is a shopping mall established in 1981[2] in the Portland, Oregon, metropolitan area, located on unincorporated land[1] in the Clackamas area of Clackamas County, in the U.S. state of Oregon. It is managed and co-owned by Brookfield Properties Retail Group and is currently anchored by J.C. Penney, Macy's (including a separate home store), Nordstrom, and Sears. It also includes a 20-screen Century movie theater.

Location[edit]

The mall has a Happy Valley, Oregon, mailing address, but is actually located in an unincorporated area.[1] However, the city of Happy Valley was interested in annexing the area that includes the mall. The nearby city of Milwaukie was also interested in annexing the area.[1] In December 2012, mediation between officials of the two cities resulted in a draft agreement under which the mall and other land west of Interstate 205 would eventually be annexed by Milwaukie.[4]

History[edit]

Construction and early years[edit]

Tonya Harding skating in the mall Ice Chalet, 1994; the ice rink was removed in late 2007 during renovations

The two-level enclosed mall, with 1,218,000 square feet (113,200 m2) of retail space officially opened on March 6, 1981, built by Ernest W. Hahn, Inc.[2] and designed by Seattle architects John Graham & Company.[5] Prior to the mall's opening, the attached the Meier & Frank store opened in October 1980.[6] Original anchors included J. C. Penney, Meier & Frank, Nordstrom, Sears and Montgomery Ward. There was also an ice rink; a five-screen movie theater; and a branch of the Clackamas County Library.[2] Also featured were three large cedar sculptures carved by artist and woodsman, Dudley C. Carter,[2] which were commissioned by the center in 1979, when Carter was eighty-eight.

South entrance in 2011

TriMet diverted or extended its bus service into the new mall, constructing a new transit center in the parking area on the mall's north side,[7] which opened in November 1981[8] and by 1985 was being used by six bus routes. In the 1990s, Olympic skater Tonya Harding frequently practiced on the ice rink.[9]

The mall remained largely unchanged until Montgomery Ward went bankrupt and closed its store in 2001. Meier & Frank acquired the former Ward building and opened a home store in 2002 in the upper level, while leasing out the lower level to Copeland Sports. The ice rink closed in 2003, the original movie theater closed in 2005, and Copeland in turn closed in 2006.

2007 renovations and expansion[edit]

Interior view in 2011

General Growth Properties acquired a 50% interest in the property in 2002 and assumed management. A major redevelopment began in 2005 to add 250,000 sq ft (23,000 m2) to the center. As part of the construction the area formerly occupied by the ice rink was gutted, and the Carter sculptures were removed. Designed by architectural firm DLR Group, the renovation and expansion added approximately 40 new stores and restaurants, many in a new lifestyle center on the south side, and a new 75,000 sq ft (7,000 m2), 20-screen Century multiplex theater. The renovation also put in tranquility ponds, new flooring, lighting, furniture, escalators, elevators, handrails, and exterior upgrades. It was completed in late 2007. The new, larger movie theater opened in December 2007.[10]

In September 2009, a new MAX Light Rail station opened at the mall, with the opening of the Green Line.[11] The Clackamas Town Center Transit Center station is the southern terminus of the Green Line and is located on the east side of the mall's parking area. It is also served by several bus lines and it replaced the original transit center, which had closed in 2006 and temporarily been replaced by simple bus stops pending construction of the new facility.

2012 shooting[edit]

A shooting occurred on December 11, 2012, which left three people, including the gunman, dead, and one person seriously wounded. At approximately 3:20 p.m. PST., 22-year-old Jacob Tyler Roberts opened fire near Macy's at the upper level of the mall with an AR-15 rifle. Roberts was wearing a hockey mask and was heard by witnesses shouting out "I am the shooter!" while he fired shots.[12] A 45-year-old man and a 54-year-old woman were killed, and Roberts died from a self-inflicted gunshot wound to the head. A fifteen-year-old girl suffered gunshot wounds to the chest and was hospitalized at Oregon Health & Science University Hospital in serious, stable condition. An estimated 60 rounds were fired from Roberts' rifle, and there were about 10,000 shoppers present at the mall at the time of the attack.[12][13][14]

2018 closure of Sears[edit]

On August 22, 2018, Sears announced that its store would be closing as part of a plan to close 46 stores nationwide. The store will close in November 2018.[15] After the store closes, JCPenney, Macy's, and Nordstrom will be the remaining anchors left.

Anchor stores[edit]

The Sears store, located at the mall's west end

Current[edit]

Former[edit]

  • Meier & Frank, opened October 1980;[6] closed in 2006 reopened as Macy's in 2006
  • Copeland Sports (96,000 ft²; opened 2002 in lower level of former Montgomery Ward, closed 2006, space reclaimed by Macy's Home 2007)
  • Montgomery Ward (165,000 ft²; closed 2001, subdivided 2002 into Meier & Frank Home, Copeland Sports)

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ The mall's (USPS mailing address is 12000 SE 82nd Avenue, Happy Valley, OR 97086, but mall is actually located in the unincorporated Clackamas area, not in Happy Valley).[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Rendleman, Raymond (December 14, 2011). "Clackamas Town Center land in middle of tussle: County mediates annexation dispute between Happy Valley, Milwaukie". Clackamas Review. Retrieved April 5, 2015.
  2. ^ a b c d e Sorenson, Donald J. (March 7, 1981). "Clackamas Town Center opens its doors". The Oregonian, p. A19.
  3. ^ a b c "Clackamas Town Center". Brookfield Properties Retail Group.
  4. ^ Rendleman, Raymond (December 5, 2012). "Cities agree on Clackamas Town Center boundary line". Clackamas Review. Retrieved December 16, 2012.
  5. ^ MacIntosh, Heather M. (November 3, 1998). "Graham, John Jr. (1908-1991)". Historylink. Retrieved August 9, 2011.
  6. ^ a b "New M&F store lures huge crowd". (October 2, 1980). The Oregonian, p. D1.
  7. ^ Kohler, Vince (June 30, 1981). "Clackamas center builds bus facility". The Oregonian ("MetroSouth" edition), p. MS1.
  8. ^ "Open for business" (photograph with caption, of new TriMet transit center) (November 24, 1981). The Oregonian (MetroSouth edition), p. MS4.
  9. ^ Orlean, Susan (February 21, 1994). "Becoming Tonya Harding". The New Yorker. Retrieved February 12, 2018.
  10. ^ Wolfe, Tom (December 19, 2007). "20-screen theater opens Friday in Clackamas". The Oregonian. Retrieved August 9, 2011.
  11. ^ Redden, Jim (September 10, 2009). "After 35 years of waiting, TriMet's Green Line hits all the parties: Thousands ride new I-205 line that was born of a '70s freeway rebellion". Portland Tribune. Archived from the original on June 8, 2011. Retrieved 2014-05-13.
  12. ^ a b Martinez, Michael (December 12, 2012). "'I have lived one crazy life so far,' Oregon mall gunman says on Facebook". CNN. Retrieved December 12, 2012.
  13. ^ Two people shot to death at mall in Portland, Oregon; gunman also dies
  14. ^ Bella, Rick (December 12, 2012). "Clackamas Town Center shooting: Killer was Jacob Tyler Roberts; fatalities were Steve Forsyth, Cindy Ann Yuille". The Oregonian via OregonLive.com. Retrieved December 12, 2012.
  15. ^ "Sears [to] close 46 unprofitable stores, two located in Portland area". KPTV. August 22, 2018. Retrieved November 3, 2018.
  16. ^ a b c d e "Directory". Clackamas Town Center. Retrieved February 12, 2018.

External links[edit]