Claire Diaz Ortiz

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Diaz-Ortiz in 2011

Claire Diaz-Ortiz [1] (born 1982) is an American author, speaker, and employee of Twitter.[2][3][4] Hired early on by Twitter co-founder Biz Stone to lead social innovation, she was the first employee to write a book about the platform.

The Pope[edit]

Diaz-Ortiz has been called "The Woman Who Got the Pope on Twitter" and "Twitter's Pontiff Recruitment Chief" for her efforts with the Vatican, and can be seen standing by his side when he sent his first tweet.[5][6] She has also worked extensively with other world leaders. [7][8]

Education[edit]

Diaz-Ortiz earned a BA and MA from Stanford University. Her graduating class produced a number of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs, including Joe Lonsdale, Chris Cox, Clara Shih of Hearsay Social, and Jared Cohen.

She holds an MBA from Oxford University,[9] where she was a 2008 Skoll Foundation Scholar at Oxford's Said Business School,[10] the home of the Skoll Centre for Social Entrepreneurship.[11] The Skoll Foundation Scholarship honors five social entrepreneurs per year with a fully funded MBA at Oxford University.[12]

Awards and recognition[edit]

Diaz-Ortiz has been named "One of the 100 Most Creative People in Business" by Fast Company,[13] and is #4 on the Mashable list, "15 Fascinating Twitter Employees."[14][15][16] She writes for LinkedIn as a LinkedIn Influencer, one of a group of several hundred global leaders.[17]

Works[edit]

Diaz-Ortiz is the author of several books, including Twitter for Good: Change the World One Tweet at a Time; Greater Expectations: Succeed (and Stay Sane) in an On-Demand, All-Access, Always-On Age; and Hope Runs: An American Tourist, A Kenyan Boy, a Journey of Redemption. [18]

Her book, Twitter for Good, [19] includes a foreword by Biz Stone.[20][21]

Hope Runs[edit]

She co-founded Hope Runs,[22] a non-profit organization in Kenya [23] she started after living in a Kenyan orphanage.[24]

Family[edit]

Diaz-Ortiz has a teenage foster son she met while living in an orphanage in Kenya. He is the co-author on the memoir, Hope Runs: An American Tourist, A Kenyan Boy, a Journey of Redemption.[25] She is the daughter of investigative journalist Lance Williams, winner of two George Polk Awards and NYT bestselling author of Game of Shadows.[26]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Businessweek (March 16, 2009). "As Jobs Dry Up, MBAs Seek Alternative Paths" [1]
  2. ^ Tech Crunch (September 22, 2011) "Istanbul, Here I Come."
  3. ^ CNN (February 22, 2012)
  4. ^ The Huffington Post (November 29, 2011). "Social Good Stars: Claire Diaz-Ortiz." [2]
  5. ^ Wired (December 17, 2012). "The Woman Who Got the Pope on Twitter." [3]
  6. ^ The Washington Post (December 11, 2012). "For Twitter, a lofty purpose as Pope Benedict XVI makes his first tweet." [4]
  7. ^ The New York Times (June 2, 2012). "Christian Leaders are Powerhouses on Twitter." [5]
  8. ^ PBS April 8, 2013). "Claire Diaz-Ortiz: Twitter's Outreach to Religious Leaders." [6]
  9. ^ Independent (October 7, 2010). "Students seek a responsible angle to their studies" [7]
  10. ^ The Financial (March 19, 2011). "Said Business School: Using Mobile Technology to Mobilise Social Change"
  11. ^ '"
  12. ^ Social Edge (). "The Skoll Scholarship for the Oxford MBA"
  13. ^ Fast Company (May, 2012). "100 Most Creative People in Business."
  14. ^ Mashable (February 10, 2012). "Follow Twitter's 15 Most Fascinating Employees." [8]
  15. ^ Buffer (July 5, 2011). "Who Works for Twitter."
  16. ^ Washington Post (September 6, 2011). "Harnessing Twitter to Change the World." [9]
  17. ^ The New York Times' (June 16, 2013). "LinkedIn Builds Its Publishing Presence."
  18. ^ Publishers Weekly (May 25, 2011). "Give 'em the Business: Business Books 2011" [10]
  19. ^ Publishers Weekly (May 25, 2011). "Give 'em the Business: Business Books 2011" [11]
  20. ^ Washington Post (October 25, 2011). "Where New Media and Religion Meet" [12]
  21. ^ Christianity Today (October 7, 2011). "Twitter Reaches Out To Christian Leaders" [13]
  22. ^ Huffington Post (April 18, 2009). "Hope Runs: Helping Orphans Find Their Footing" [14]
  23. ^ Runners World (June 19, 2007). "Project Hope: Two Americans are Using Running to Help Kenyan Orphans Find Their Footing" [15]
  24. ^ Ode Magazine . "Intelligent Optimists"
  25. ^ Publishers Weekly . "Spring Audiobooks 2014"
  26. ^ CIR Online . "Lance Williams"

External links[edit]