Claire L. Evans

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Claire L. Evans
Yacht @ Wellington Square (1 3 2009) (3336273343).jpg
Background information
Origin Portland, Oregon, United States
Genres Indie rock, electropop, dance-pop
Years active 2008-present
Labels DFA, States Rights, Marriage
Website www.teamyacht.com

Claire L. Evans is an American singer, writer, and artist based in Los Angeles, California. She is the lead singer of the pop duo YACHT.[1] Evans joined YACHT in 2008 after sharing a "mystical experience" with collaborator Jona Bechtolt, and has recorded three albums, See Mystery Lights, Shangri-La, and I Thought the Future Would Be Cooler with Bechtolt.[2] She also appeared as a guest on YACHT's third album, I Believe in You. Your Magic Is Real. Known for her androgynous onstage persona as a performer, she has been called a "neo-Annie Lennox" by the New York Times.[1] NPR music journalist Bob Boilen has referred to her as "one of the most striking performers I've seen in a rock band."[3]

In addition, Evans is a science journalist, with a popular science and culture blog, Universe, hosted by National Geographic's Scienceblogs network.[4] Her essay for Universe, "Moon Art: Fallen Astronaut" was anthologized in The Best Science Writing Online 2012.[5] She is the co-author of New Art/Science Affinities, a book about contemporary artists working at the intersection of science and technology.[6] In an interview with the contemporary art blog Bad At Sports, Evans called the book "an attempt to document an emergent form of art practice in a micro-encyclopedic tome."[7] She is also the author of a collection of essays called High Frontiers, published by Publication Studio, a small press in Portland, Oregon. USA Today called the book, "sharp, short and accessible to scholars as well as those of us who don't read much science writing."[8] In August 2013, she became the editor-in-chief of OMNI Reboot, a new online version of the science magazine OMNI.[9] She is currently the Futures Editor of Motherboard, Vice (magazine)'s technology and science website.

She is a member of the feminist collective Deep Lab.[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Spiridakis, Elizabeth (15 October 2009). "The Insider - Yacht's Claire Evans". tmagazine.blogs.nytimes.com. Retrieved 27 June 2016. 
  2. ^ "Sent from Space: YACHT's Claire Evans". Mother Jones. Retrieved 2013-12-19. 
  3. ^ Boilen, Bob (2011-06-22). "YACHT: Tiny Desk Concert". NPR. Retrieved 2013-12-19. 
  4. ^ "Universe - Always Expanding". Scienceblogs.com. 2013-02-15. Retrieved 2013-12-19. 
  5. ^ Evans, Claire L. (2012-09-20). "The Best Science Writing Online 2012 – Universe". Scienceblogs.com. Retrieved 2013-12-19. 
  6. ^ "New Art/Science Affinities book >Miller Gallery at Carnegie Mellon University". Millergallery.cfa.cmu.edu. Retrieved 2013-12-19. 
  7. ^ "Interview With Claire L. Evans". Bad at Sports. 2011-12-06. Retrieved 2013-12-19. 
  8. ^ "Good read: 'High Frontiers' by Yacht's Claire Evans". Usatoday.com. 2013-04-26. Retrieved 2013-12-19. 
  9. ^ Robertson, Adi (2013-08-08). "Omni, reboot: an iconic sci-fi magazine goes back to the future". The Verge. Retrieved 2013-12-19. 
  10. ^ Wendy Syfret (20 July 2015). "exploring feminist hacktivism with deep lab". i-d.vice.com. i-d Vice. Retrieved 27 June 2016.