Claire Lehmann

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Claire Lehmann
Claire Lehmann on Rebel Wisdom.jpg
Lehmann on Rebel Wisdom in 2019
Born (1985-07-18) 18 July 1985 (age 34)[1]
NationalityAustralian
EducationBachelor's degree in psychology and English
Alma materUniversity of Adelaide
OccupationEditor-in-chief, Quillette
Years active2015–present
Known forFounder and editor-in-chief of Quillette
Children2
Websiteclairelehmann.net

Claire Lehmann (née Jensen, born 18 July 1985) is an Australian journalist and the founding editor of Quillette.

Personal life[edit]

Lehmann is the daughter of a former teacher and a speech pathologist who was raised in Adelaide, South Australia.[2] She graduated with a bachelor's degree in psychology and English from the University of Adelaide with first class honours in 2010 and was a graduate student in psychology, but dropped out after having a child. She is married and has two children.[3] She is the daughter-in-law of the poet Geoffrey Lehmann.[4]

Career[edit]

Lehmann, a former contributor of a variety of outlets, founded Quillette in October 2015,[5][6] with the goal of publishing intellectually rigorous material that makes arguments or presents data not in keeping with the contemporary intellectual consensus.[2][5][7][8][9] According to the national newspaper The Australian, Lehmann's choice to publish "a story about the sacking of Google engineer James Damore, who had written an internal memo criticising the company’s push for diversity and what he called 'an ideological echo chamber'" precipitated her venture's success.[6][10][11][12][13] Her website was temporarily shut down by a DDoS attack following publication of the piece.[14][15]

Lehmann has contributed to a variety of publications, including The Guardian; Harvard's Kennedy School Review; in Spanish for Tercera Cultura;[16][17][18] Scientific American;[19] Commentary;[20] Rebel Australia, part of the Canadian Rebel Media network;[21] the American Jewish online magazine Tablet;[22] and ABC News (Australia).[23]

Bari Weiss regards Lehmann as one of the leaders of the "intellectual dark web", a group of intellectuals who are "determined to resist parroting what's politically convenient".[8][24][25][26][27][2] The Sydney Morning Herald named Lehmann in their "Ten Aussies who shook the world in tech and media in 2018" citing that her online magazine, Quillette, has "attracted as many as 2 million followers a month, [and] is starting to gain significant traction in tech and libertarian circles in the US".[28]

References[edit]

  1. ^ @clairlemon (18 July 2018). "Celebrating my 33rd birthday with the lovely @rivatez" (Tweet). Retrieved 23 March 2019 – via Twitter.
  2. ^ a b c Lester, Amelia. "The Voice of the 'Intellectual Dark Web': Claire Lehmann's online magazine, Quillette, prides itself on publishing 'dangerous' ideas other outlets won't touch. How far is it willing to go?". Politico Magazine (November/December 2018). ISSN 2381-1595.
  3. ^ Lehmann, Claire. "BIO". Claire Lehmann. Retrieved 1 October 2018. Before starting Quillette, I was a grad-student in psychology, but dropped out after having a baby. I graduated from The University of Adelaide with First Class Honours in 2010.
  4. ^ Lehmann, Claire (26 November 2018). "If you're at a loose end in Sydney tomorrow night, come to my father-in-law's book launch. Geoffrey Lehmann was a poet during the era of the Sydney Push, (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sydney_Push …) & his memoir has many interesting tales". External link in |title= (help)
  5. ^ a b Dale, Helen (2 June 2018). "Australia's Mistress of the Intellectual Dark Web". The Spectator. Retrieved 6 June 2018.
  6. ^ a b Macken, Deirdre (19 July 2018). "Centre stage in the culture war". The Australian. Archived from the original on 19 July 2018. Retrieved 2 October 2018. Last August, 'everything changed' when Lehmann published a story about the sacking of Google engineer James Damore, who had written an internal memo criticising the company’s push for diversity and what he called “an ideological echo chamber”. She had commissioned four scientists to review Damore’s comments, mostly favourably, and the story was published just as he was sacked.
  7. ^ Beck, Chris no (8 May 2018). "Claire Lehmann's Forum for the Intellectual Dark Web". Splice Today. Retrieved 6 June 2018.
  8. ^ a b Weiss, Bari (8 May 2018). "Meet the Renegades of the Intellectual Dark Web; An alliance of heretics is making an end run around the mainstream conversation. Should we be listening?". New York Times. Retrieved 6 June 2018.
  9. ^ Wooley, Charles (26 August 2018), Age of outrage: Part one - Science proves we’re getting high on hate (Television production), Willoughby, New South Wales: 60 Minutes Australia, event occurs at 4:07, 6h_4_lEm5fY, retrieved 2 October 2018, She's the editor of Quillette an online magazine she started up to give voice to writers shunned by the mainstream media.
  10. ^ "The Google Memo: Four Scientists Respond". Quillette. 7 August 2017. Archived from the original on 16 August 2017. Retrieved 3 October 2018.
  11. ^ Young, Cathy (8 August 2017). "Googler fired for diversity memo had legit points on gender". USA Today. Archived from the original on 8 August 2017. Retrieved 3 October 2018.
  12. ^ Brooks, David (11 August 2017). "Sundar Pichai Should Resign as Google's C.E.O." The New York Times. Archived from the original on 11 August 2017. Retrieved 3 October 2018.
  13. ^ Shermer, Michael (September 2017). "The Unfortunate Fallout of Campus Postmodernism: The roots of the current campus madness". Scientific American. Archived from the original on 18 August 2017. Retrieved 3 October 2018.
  14. ^ Airaksinen, Toni (9 August 2017). "Libertarian Site Suffers DDoS Attack After Supporting Google Worker". PJ Media. Archived from the original on 18 August 2017. Retrieved 17 August 2017. Quillette Magazine, a small but respected libertarian publication based in Australia, suffered a DDoS attack Tuesday after publishing an article supportive of James Damore, the fired Google memo writer.
  15. ^ Leef, George (11 August 2017). "Ideas (Like the Bad Ones Kids Learn in College) Have Consequences". National Review. Archived from the original on 14 August 2017. Retrieved 17 August 2017. A much less covered story was the taking down (at least temporarily) of a site, Quillette.com, that had posted commentary favorable to the Google engineer’s memo about the company’s diversity policies.
  16. ^ "Claire Lehmann". The Guardian. Retrieved 1 October 2018. Claire Lehmann is a Sydney-based freelance writer. Her work has appeared in The Sydney Morning Herald, Harvard Kennedy School Review, and has been translated into Spanish for Tercera Cultura.
  17. ^ Lehmann, Claire (10 February 2014). "Digital Mobs & Outrage Generation". Kennedy School Review. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  18. ^ "Autor: Claire Lehmann". Tercera Cultura (in Spanish). Archived from the original on 3 October 2018. Retrieved 3 October 2018.
  19. ^ "Stories by Claire Lehmann". Scientific American. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  20. ^ "Claire Lehmann, Author at Commentary". Commentary. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  21. ^ "Claire Lehmann || ARCHIVES". The Rebel Media. Retrieved 1 October 2018. Claire has written op-eds and feature articles for The Sydney Morning Herald, The Guardian, ABC’s The Drum, and Quillette. Her essays have also been cited in the National Review, The Wall Street Journal, The Australian, and The Spectator.
  22. ^ "Claire Lehmann, Author at Tablet Magazine". Tablet Magazine. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  23. ^ "Claire Lehmann". Australian Broadcasting Corporation. 7 July 2014. Retrieved 2 October 2018. Claire Lehmann is a freelance writer and editor of Quillette Magazine.
  24. ^ Edroso, Roy (14 May 2018). "Conservatives Cheer the Latest Right-Wing Supergroup, the Intellectual Dark Web". The Village Voice. Retrieved 6 June 2018.
  25. ^ Daum, Meghan (16 March 2018). "A new movement to speak truth to identity politics is our best hope against regressive thinking". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on 17 March 2018. Retrieved 3 October 2018. The nest of free thinkers includes, to name just a few, Claire Lehmann, founder and editor of the online magazine Quillette, the bioethicist and author Alice Dreger, and Bret Weinstein and Heather Heying.
  26. ^ Beres, Derek (5 March 2018). "These are the women behind the Intellectual Dark Web". Big Think. Archived from the original on 5 March 2018. Retrieved 3 October 2018.
  27. ^ Daum, Meghan (22 March 2018). "Speaking truth to identify politics". Providence Journal. Archived from the original on 24 March 2018. Retrieved 3 October 2018.
  28. ^ McDuling, John (25 December 2018). "Ten Aussies who shook the world in tech and media in 2018". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 25 December 2018.

External links[edit]