Jump to content

Clairo

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Clairo
Clairo performing at the Greek Theatre in Los Angeles, California, 2022
Clairo performing at the Greek Theatre in Los Angeles, California, 2022
Background information
Birth nameClaire Elizabeth Cottrill
Also known asDJ Baby Benz
Born (1998-08-18) August 18, 1998 (age 25)[1]
Atlanta, Georgia, U.S.
OriginCarlisle, Massachusetts, U.S.
Genres
Occupation(s)Singer-songwriter
Instrument(s)
  • Vocals
  • guitar
  • keyboards
  • clarinet
Years active2012–present
Labels
Websiteclairo.com

Claire Elizabeth Cottrill (born August 18, 1998), known professionally as Clairo, is an American singer-songwriter. Born in Atlanta, Georgia, and raised in Carlisle, Massachusetts, she began posting music on the internet at age 13.[7]

Clairo rose to prominence following the viral success of the music video for her lo-fi single "Pretty Girl" in 2017.[8][9] She subsequently signed a record deal, releasing her debut EP Diary 001 (2018) with Fader Label.[10] Her debut studio album Immunity (2019) spawned the singles "Bags" and "Sofia", the latter of which became her first single to chart on the Billboard Hot 100.[11] Cottrill's second studio album, Sling, was released in 2021 to commercial success, debuting in the top 20 of the US Billboard 200. Her third studio album, Charm, was self-released on July 12, 2024.

Life and career[edit]

Claire Cottrill was born in Atlanta, Georgia, and raised in Carlisle, Massachusetts.[12] She is the daughter of marketing executive Geoff Cottrill and Allie Cottrill, a photographer and designer.

2011–2016: Early career[edit]

Cottrill began recording covers on her MacBook at the age of 13, beginning with a cover of a Maroon 5 song. In a 2015 interview with Rookie, she recalled of this first recording, "It took me hours to figure out if I wanted to post it on Facebook or not to even tell my friends that I’d made it. I was so nervous about it! I just closed my eyes and did it, and then I closed my computer and tried not to think about it".[13][14] She would also perform covers at local businesses including Blue Dry Goods. During this time, MTV contacted her to record a song to be used as background music for one of their shows, but the song was never used.[15] She began posting music to Bandcamp under the names Clairo and DJ Baby Benz while attending Concord-Carlisle High School. She went on to post covers and songs in addition to DJ mixes of rap music on SoundCloud.[15][16] She also posted three short films on an old YouTube channel,[17] and maintained a second one where she would post covers in addition to short films.[2]

She launched her EP Do U Wanna Fall in Love? in 2013 after releasing several home recordings. A few additional EPs, including Aquarius Boy, Late Show, Moth Girl, Metal Heart, and Have a Nice Day, came after this in 2015.

2017–2018: diary 001 EP[edit]

Clairo first drew wide attention in late 2017 when the video for her song "Pretty Girl" went viral on YouTube.[2] The song was recorded for an indie rock compilation benefiting the Transgender Law Center.[18] According to her, she recorded the track "using the resources around me which were pretty shitty. I used like a little keyboard that I had and I was really into '80s pop music – my mom is obsessed with it – so it kind of inspired me to do something like that."[19] She has attributed audience interest in the video to YouTube's algorithm system.[18] The video was quickly lumped into the growing genre of bedroom pop, and also became popular on vaporwave-centric Facebook groups.[19][20] "Pretty Girl" had amassed more than 81 million views on YouTube by 2022.[18]

Another video, "Flaming Hot Cheetos", was released a month before "Pretty Girl" on YouTube. It garnered 3 million views by July 2018.[21] The success of "Pretty Girl" led to interest from major labels such as Capitol, RCA, and Columbia. Jon Cohen, the co-founder of The Fader, signed Clairo to the magazine's associated record label with a 12-song record contract and introduced her to Pat Corcoran, manager of Chance the Rapper. She became a client of talent agency Haight Brand near the end of 2017.[18]

On May 25, 2018, Fader Label released Clairo's debut record, titled Diary 001.[22] In her review for Pitchfork, Fader contributor Sasha Geffen wrote that the EP ought to subside the "legions of naysayers who dismissed her as a one-hit fluke or an industry plant."[23] A piece written by Joe Coscarelli of The New York Times said that the EP "bridges both worlds, building on the coy, understated bedroom pop of 'Pretty Girl' and 'Flaming Hot Cheetos' toward sturdier numbers like '4EVER' and 'B.O.M.D.'"[18] Also in May, Clairo announced a headlining tour throughout North America, as well as select dates opening for Dua Lipa.[24] Her July performance at the Bowery Ballroom in New York was a sold-out show.[21] In August 2018, she performed at Lollapalooza.[25] She performed at Coachella in 2019.[26]

2019–2020: Immunity[edit]

Clairo performing live at the El Rey Theatre in Los Angeles, 2019

On May 24, 2019, Clairo released a new single, "Bags", and announced her debut studio album Immunity,[27] which was released on August 2, 2019.[28] She would further release two more singles from the album, "Closer to You" and "Sofia".[29][30] Following the album's commercial success, Apple Music named Clairo an Up Next artist in August 2019.[31]

Clairo made her television debut performing "I Wouldn't Ask You" on Jimmy Kimmel Live! in September 2019,[32] before performing "Bags" on The Ellen DeGeneres Show a few days later.[33] In December 2019, she won Pop Artist of the Year at the 2019 Boston Music Awards for the second consecutive year, as well as Album of the Year for Immunity.[34] "Bags" was included in over 15 critics' lists ranking the year's top songs including Pitchfork's and Paste's lists of best songs of the decade.[35][36] Immunity was included in over 10 critics' end of year lists, including The Guardian, Pitchfork, Billboard and Los Angeles Times.[37][38][39][40] As of 2019, Clairo was managed by Mike Ahern and Jimmy Bui.[41]

2020–2023: Sling[edit]

In April 2020, Clairo revealed that she had begun working on her second studio album via a tweet of a screenshot of a playlist titled 'Album 2 (demos so far)'.[42] On October of that same year, she formed a new band called Shelly with indie pop artist Claud and their two friends from Syracuse University, Josh Mehling and Noa Frances Getzug.[43] The group released two songs, "Steeeam" and "Natural", on October 30, 2020.[43]

Clairo at the Sling sessions, 2021.

On June 11, 2021, Clairo released "Blouse", the first single from her second studio album, Sling, which was announced that same day.[44][45] The record is for Cottrill, but it is also a record of her attempts to reevaluate her goals in life, that bears the Laurel Canyon imprint and replaces Immunity's sparse electronic flourishes with lush, acoustic folk frequently adorned with swooning vocal harmonies, delicate strings, and the warm swell of brass.[46] It was released on July 16, 2021, and was praised for Clairo's artistic progression and thematic songwriting that ponders future motherhood, domesticity and the responsibility of becoming a caregiver.[47][48] It also appeared on numerous "best albums of 2021" lists.[49][50][51]

In February 2022, Clairo embarked on the US leg of the Sling tour.[52] She canceled the last three dates of her North American tour, after a technical incident at her gig in Toronto left her with temporary hearing damage.[53] After two songs, her opening show of the UK tour in Bristol had to be canceled due to a case of sinusitis that was affecting her voice, leading to her having a panic attack onstage and leaving afterward.[54] The Glasgow show was canceled but the show the day after it in Manchester went ahead, and her final UK show of that tour was in London.[54]

In 2023, the singer appeared as an opening act for Boygenius during the inaugural Re:SET Concert Series.[55] In May, after being featured on remixes by Phoenix and Beabadoobee,[56][57] she released the EP Live at Electric Lady, containing new versions of songs from her first two albums.[58] She also released two charity singles on Bandcamp, "For Now" with all proceeds directed to Everytown for Gun Safety and For The Gworls,[59] and "Lavender" to raise funds for Doctors Without Borders during the Israel–Hamas war.[60]

2024–present: Charm[edit]

In January 2024, Clairo teased a new album with a post on Instagram, captioning it "maybe this year".[61] In March, she shared an Instagram post captioned with emojis depicting the number three, a check mark, and a purple heart. The post was interpreted by music publication The Forty-Five to mean that her third studio album was complete.[62] On May 23, Clairo announced that the album, titled Charm and produced by Leon Michels, was scheduled for release on July 12, while releasing its lead single, "Sexy to Someone".[63][64] On May 29, she scheduled two residencies to support the album in New York and Los Angeles for September.[65]

Artistry[edit]

Clairo recalled that the Shins' Wincing the Night Away (2007) was the first album she "really completely geeked out over", crediting it as her inspiration to make music.[66] Based on the fact that many around her told her that a career in music was unlikely, she did not consider it a likely prospect and musically "kind of did whatever" she wanted.[66] She has stated that her musical influences were a mixture of her mother and father's musical taste, citing musicians such as Al Green, Brenton Wood, Billy Paul, Cocteau Twins, Trashcan Sinatras, The The and Public Image Ltd.[67]

Political views[edit]

In July 2020, Clairo signed an open letter to then-UK Equalities minister Liz Truss calling for a ban on all forms of LGBT+ conversion therapy.[68]

In May 2022, a leaked draft opinion showed that the U.S. Supreme Court was planning to overturn abortion rights established in Roe v. Wade. Cottrill, alongside other musical artists like Lorde, Olivia Rodrigo and Phoebe Bridgers, signed a full-page ad in The New York Times condemning the planned Supreme Court decision.[69][70] While performing at Glastonbury in June 2022, Cottrill wore a t-shirt saying "Bans Off Our Bodies" in protest to the U.S. Supreme Court's Dobbs v. Jackson Women's Health Organization final decision which overturned access to abortion granted in Roe v. Wade.[71]

In October 2023, Clairo signed the Artists4Ceasefire open letter calling for a ceasefire in the Israel–Hamas war to President Joe Biden.[72]

Personal life[edit]

In 2017, Cottrill began attending Syracuse University,[15] studying in the Bandier Program for Recording and Entertainment Industries, but dropped out after one year to pursue music full time.[73]

Cottrill was diagnosed with juvenile idiopathic arthritis at the age of 17.[74]

After the success of "Pretty Girl", a number of social media users (specifically on discussion website Reddit) began claiming that Clairo was an "industry plant" who gained success through her father's nepotism.[74][21] She denied the claims, calling them sexist.[18] Writers for The Guardian and The Ringer also stated that her father's connections facilitated her record contract signing.[75][21] In 2021 she spoke openly about the accusations, telling Rolling Stone, "I definitely am not blind to the fact that things have been easier for me than other people's experiences. It would be stupid of me to not acknowledge the privilege I had from the start to be able to sign somewhere where there's trust, to be able to sign a record deal that doesn't revolve around keeping myself afloat financially."[76]

Cottrill came out as bisexual to her fans via Twitter in May 2018.[77][78] In an interview, she explained that making friends in college is what helped her to come out, as they were openly gay and she was inspired by "their confidence and their willingness to be exposed."[79]

Discography[edit]

Studio albums

Live performances[edit]

Headlining tours[edit]

  • Lazy Days Tour (2018)[81]
  • Immunity Tour (2019)[82]
  • Sling Tour (2022–2023)[83]

Concert residencies[edit]

  • Charm Residency (2024)[84]

Awards and nominations[edit]

Year Organization Award Work Result Ref.
2018 Boston Music Awards Artist of the Year Clairo Nominated [85][86]
Pop Artist of the Year Won
Album/EP of the Year Diary 001 Nominated
2019 Artist of the Year Clairo Nominated [87][88]
Pop Artist of the Year Won
Album of the Year Immunity Won
Song of the Year "Bags" Nominated
BBC Radio 1 Hottest Record of the Year Fifth [89]
2020 NME Awards Best Song in the World Nominated [90]
Best New Act in the World Clairo Won
2022 iHeartRadio Music Awards Best New Alternative Artist Clairo Nominated

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ting, Jasmine (August 18, 2019). "Clairo Gets a Sesame Street Surprise from Khalid". Paper. Archived from the original on January 24, 2021. Retrieved October 10, 2019.
  2. ^ a b c Moore, Jacob (September 29, 2017). "Meet Clairo, the Lo-Fi Bedroom Singer/Songwriter Who Went Viral By Being Herself". Complex. Archived from the original on August 18, 2021. Retrieved January 19, 2019.
  3. ^ a b c St. Asaph, Katherine (August 2, 2019). "Clairo Immunity". Pitchfork. Archived from the original on July 19, 2021. Retrieved March 9, 2021.
  4. ^ a b Droke, Carolyn (February 17, 2020). "Clairo's New Lo-Fi Demo Calls Back To Her Early Days As A Musician". Uproxx. Archived from the original on April 21, 2021. Retrieved March 9, 2021.
  5. ^ Caramanica, Jon (March 7, 2018). "The New Indie Pop: Off-Kilter, Handmade, Whimsical and Emotional". The New York Times. Archived from the original on June 25, 2021. Retrieved July 13, 2022.
  6. ^ Empire, Kitty (December 7, 2019). "Clairo review – a quiet phenomenon". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Archived from the original on July 19, 2021. Retrieved October 29, 2020.
  7. ^ "Clairo Biography, Songs, & Albums". AllMusic. Archived from the original on July 5, 2023. Retrieved March 6, 2022.
  8. ^ Clairo – Pretty Girl. Claire Cottrill. August 4, 2017. Archived from the original on November 5, 2022. Retrieved December 20, 2022 – via YouTube.
  9. ^ Coscarelli, Joe (May 23, 2018). "Clairo's 'Pretty Girl' Went Viral. Then She Had to Prove Herself". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Archived from the original on September 3, 2021. Retrieved March 6, 2022.
  10. ^ Kaplan, Ilana (June 28, 2019). "Why Clairo Passed on Major Label Offers And Built Her Own Team". Billboard. Retrieved March 6, 2022.
  11. ^ Zellner, Xander (October 20, 2020). "Clairo Scores First Career Billboard Hot 100 Hit With 'Sofia'". Billboard. Retrieved March 6, 2022.
  12. ^ Ignacio, Joseph (November 28, 2019). "Clairo completes "Immunity" tour by conquering Boston". The Raider Times. Archived from the original on January 22, 2021. Retrieved November 21, 2020.
  13. ^ Zoladz, Lindsay (July 25, 2018). "The Curious Case of Clairo". The Ringer. Retrieved September 13, 2023.
  14. ^ Campbell, Nilina (May 11, 2015). "Claire Cottrill: Sweet 17". Rookie. Retrieved September 13, 2023.
  15. ^ a b c Moreland, Quinn (January 16, 2018). Meet Clairo, the YouTube Star Turning Teenage Awkwardness Into Viral Gold Archived January 24, 2021, at the Wayback Machine, Pitchfork
  16. ^ Alumni Writers (April 14, 2014). "WIQH Brings Musical Talent from CCHS!". CCHS Voice. Archived from the original on August 21, 2019. Retrieved August 21, 2019.
  17. ^ Cottrill, Claire (October 9, 2011). "Claire Cottrill". Archived from the original on May 19, 2023. Retrieved May 19, 2023 – via YouTube.
  18. ^ a b c d e f Coscarelli, Joe (May 23, 2018). "Clairo's 'Pretty Girl' Went Viral. Then She Had to Prove Herself". The New York Times. Archived from the original on September 3, 2021. Retrieved May 31, 2018.
  19. ^ a b Tanzer, Myles (October 19, 2017). "Clairo on "Pretty Girl" and making chill pop songs for the whole internet to enjoy". The Fader. Archived from the original on July 17, 2021. Retrieved September 25, 2018.
  20. ^ Israel, Ryan (August 24, 2018). "Clairo sparkles on debut EP 'diary 001'". The Observer. Retrieved September 14, 2023.
  21. ^ a b c d Zoladz, Lindsay (July 25, 2018). "The Curious Case of Clairo". The Ringer. Archived from the original on August 2, 2021. Retrieved September 25, 2018.
  22. ^ "Clairo Announces Debut EP, Shares New Song: Listen". Pitchfork. April 27, 2018. Archived from the original on January 22, 2021. Retrieved May 1, 2018.
  23. ^ Geffen, Sasha (May 21, 2018). "Diary 001 EP". Pitchfork. Archived from the original on August 18, 2021. Retrieved January 23, 2019.
  24. ^ Kim, Michelle (May 30, 2018). "Clairo Announces Tour". Pitchfork. Archived from the original on March 31, 2019. Retrieved January 22, 2019.
  25. ^ Legaspi, Althea; Klinkenberg, Brendan (August 4, 2018). "Lollapalooza 2018: Tyler the Creator, Bruno Mars, Lizzo Highlight Day Two". Rolling Stone. Retrieved January 22, 2019.
  26. ^ "Meet Clairo, the Carlisle native who's playing Coachella". The Boston Globe. January 4, 2019. Archived from the original on March 31, 2019. Retrieved January 23, 2019.
  27. ^ "Clairo Announces Debut Album Immunity, Shares New Song "Bags": Listen". Pitchfork. May 24, 2019. Archived from the original on July 17, 2021. Retrieved July 24, 2019.
  28. ^ Sophie Caraan (August 2, 2019). "Clairo Shares Highly-Anticipated Debut Album 'Immunity'". Hypebeast. Archived from the original on August 2, 2019. Retrieved August 2, 2019.
  29. ^ SHAAD D'SOUZA. "Clairo drops new track "Sofia"". The Fader. Archived from the original on May 8, 2021. Retrieved July 26, 2019.
  30. ^ Moreland, Quinn (August 2019). "Clairo Has Something to Prove". Pitchfork. Archived from the original on October 30, 2019. Retrieved October 7, 2019.
  31. ^ Iasimone, Ashley (August 21, 2019). "Clairo Named Apple Music's 'Up Next' Artist". Billboard. Retrieved August 21, 2019.
  32. ^ Schatz, Lake (September 6, 2019). "Clairo performs "I Wouldn't Ask" with children's choir on Kimmel: Watch". Consequence of Sound. Archived from the original on December 18, 2022. Retrieved October 13, 2019.
  33. ^ Minsker, Evan (September 17, 2019). "Watch Clairo Perform "Bags" on Ellen". Pitchfork. Archived from the original on October 13, 2019. Retrieved October 13, 2019.
  34. ^ "Boston Music Awards 2019". Boston Music Awards. Retrieved May 25, 2024.
  35. ^ "The 200 Best Songs of the 2010s". Pitchfork. October 7, 2019. Archived from the original on October 7, 2019. Retrieved October 13, 2019.
  36. ^ Todd, Harry (October 21, 2019). "The 100 Best Songs of the 2010s". Paste. Archived from the original on December 31, 2019. Retrieved December 14, 2019.
  37. ^ "The 50 best albums of 2019: the full list". The Guardian. December 20, 2019. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved May 25, 2024.
  38. ^ Pitchfork (December 10, 2019). "The 50 Best Albums of 2019". Pitchfork. Retrieved May 25, 2024.
  39. ^ Staff, Billboard (December 10, 2019). "The 50 Best Albums of 2019: Staff Picks". Billboard. Retrieved May 25, 2024.
  40. ^ "Best albums and songs of 2019: Solange, Lana Del Rey and the miracle that is 'Old Town Road'". Los Angeles Times. December 11, 2019. Retrieved May 25, 2024.
  41. ^ Kaplan, Llana (June 28, 2019). "Why Clairo Passed on Major Label Offers and Built Her Own Team". Billboard.
  42. ^ Langford, Jackson (April 13, 2020). "Clairo reveals she's returned to work on her new album". NME. Archived from the original on June 24, 2021. Retrieved March 21, 2021.
  43. ^ a b Schatz, Lake (October 30, 2020). "Clairo forms new band Shelly, shares debut songs "Steeeam" and "Natural": Stream". Consequence. Archived from the original on April 23, 2021. Retrieved March 21, 2021.
  44. ^ Bloom, Madison (June 11, 2021). "Clairo Announces New Album Sling, Shares New Song "Blouse"". Pitchfork. Archived from the original on June 11, 2021. Retrieved June 11, 2021.
  45. ^ Martoccio, Angie (June 11, 2021). "Clairo Drops Crushing Ballad 'Blouse' With Backing Vocals by Lorde". Rolling Stone. Retrieved June 11, 2021.
  46. ^ Daly, Rhian (July 16, 2021). "Clairo: "I was too scared to think domesticity could be something I crave"". NME. Archived from the original on August 12, 2021. Retrieved July 24, 2021.
  47. ^ "Sling is a true testament to Clairo's masterful songwriting talents". The Line of Best Fit. Retrieved May 25, 2024.
  48. ^ Daly, Rhian (July 15, 2021). "Clairo – 'Sling' review: meditations on motherhood inspired by '70s songwriting greats". NME. Retrieved May 25, 2024.
  49. ^ Beaumont-Thomas, Ben; Snapes, Laura (December 17, 2021). "The 50 best albums of 2021". The Guardian. ISSN 0261-3077. Retrieved May 25, 2024.
  50. ^ NME (December 10, 2021). "The 50 best albums of 2021". NME. Retrieved May 25, 2024.
  51. ^ "The 50 Best Albums Of 2021". Stereogum. December 6, 2021. Retrieved May 25, 2024.
  52. ^ Aubrey, Elizabeth (February 18, 2022). "Clairo debuts new song 'Nomad' on first night of US tour". NME. Retrieved May 25, 2024.
  53. ^ Robinson, Ellie (July 30, 2022). "Clairo cancels last three shows of tour after tech mishap leads to ear injury". NME. Retrieved May 25, 2024.
  54. ^ a b Ross, Gemma (October 5, 2022). "Clairo live in London: a triumphant end to a trying tour". NME. Retrieved May 25, 2024.
  55. ^ "boygenius, Clairo set the stage for Re:SET concert series - KCR College Radio". June 7, 2023. Retrieved May 25, 2024.
  56. ^ Zemler, Emily (March 16, 2023). "Hear Clairo Join Phoenix for Atmospheric Remix of 'After Midnight'". Rolling Stone. Retrieved May 25, 2024.
  57. ^ Ruiz, Matthew Ismael (April 20, 2023). "Clairo Joins Beabadoobee for New Version of "Glue Song"". Pitchfork. Retrieved May 25, 2024.
  58. ^ Martoccio, Angie (May 12, 2023). "Clairo Takes Her Intimate Indie Gems to Electric Lady for Live EP". Rolling Stone. Retrieved May 25, 2024.
  59. ^ Bloom, Madison (April 3, 2023). "Clairo Shares New Benefit Song "For Now"". Pitchfork. Retrieved May 25, 2024.
  60. ^ Pilley, Max (October 21, 2023). "Clairo releases new track 'Lavender' to raise aid funds for Gaza". NME. Retrieved May 25, 2024.
  61. ^ Graves, Shahlin (January 12, 2024). "Clairo teases new music for release this year..." Coup De Main Magazine. Retrieved May 25, 2024.
  62. ^ Daly, Rhian (March 4, 2024). "It looks like Clairo has finished her third album". The Forty-Five. Retrieved May 25, 2024.
  63. ^ Pappis, Konstantinos (May 23, 2024). "Clairo Announces New Album 'Charm', Shares New Single 'Sexy to Someone'". Our Culture. Retrieved May 23, 2024.
  64. ^ Ragusa, Paolo (May 23, 2024). "Clairo Announces New Album Charm, Shares New Track: Stream". Consequence. Retrieved May 26, 2024.
  65. ^ Strauss, Matthew (May 29, 2024). "Clairo Announces New York and Los Angeles Concerts". Pitchfork. Retrieved May 31, 2024.
  66. ^ a b Wang, Steffannee (May 24, 2018). "Clairo would like to leave her bedroom now, please". The Fader. Archived from the original on April 17, 2021. Retrieved August 23, 2019.
  67. ^ Kahn, Jamie (March 7, 2022). "Clairo reveals her biggest musical influences". Far Out. Archived from the original on March 16, 2023. Retrieved March 3, 2023.
  68. ^ Ban Conversion Therapy [@banconversiontherapy] (July 10, 2020). "Our letter to government urging for a ban of conversion therapy has complete backing from some incredible #LGBTQ+ public figures and allies. It's supported by every leading UK #LGBT charity and human rights organisation. And now we need you're help. Use our resources, educate yourselves, write to your MP, chat to your families and SPREAD 👏🏻 THE 👏🏻 WORD. #BanConversionTherapy #ConversionTherapy #ShitYouShouldCareAbout". Archived from the original on August 21, 2020. Retrieved July 29, 2020 – via Instagram.
  69. ^ Campbell, Erica (May 13, 2022). "Billie Eilish, Phoebe Bridgers, and Halsey sign letter against US Supreme Court's overturn of abortion rights". NME. Archived from the original on May 29, 2023. Retrieved July 13, 2022.
  70. ^ Hatfield, Amanda (May 13, 2022). "160 artists condemn Supreme Court's Roe v. Wade plans ahead of rallies & marches on Saturday". Brooklyn Vegan. Archived from the original on July 13, 2022. Retrieved July 13, 2022.
  71. ^ Daly, Rhian (June 26, 2022). "Clairo live at Glastonbury 2022: a vitally soothing set from a first-class star". NME. Archived from the original on July 13, 2022. Retrieved July 13, 2022.
  72. ^ "Artists4Ceasefire". Artists4Ceasefire. Retrieved January 28, 2024.
  73. ^ Hopsicker, Katie (March 23, 2022). "Clairo's Syracuse year was a time of mutual inspiration". thenewshouse. Archived from the original on April 28, 2023. Retrieved April 28, 2023.
  74. ^ a b Cliff, Aimee (November 27, 2018). "Clairo IRL". Dazed. Archived from the original on January 14, 2021. Retrieved July 13, 2022.
  75. ^ Empire, Kitty (December 7, 2019). "Clairo review – a quiet phenomenon". The Guardian. Archived from the original on July 19, 2021. Retrieved July 13, 2020.
  76. ^ MARTOCCIO, ANGIE (July 8, 2021). "Clairo's Wide-Open Spaces". Rolling Stone. Retrieved October 30, 2022.
  77. ^ Bennett, Willa (May 27, 2019). "Clairo Opens Up About Coming Out And Coming into Her Own". them. Archived from the original on November 1, 2020. Retrieved October 5, 2019.
  78. ^ Cottrill, Claire [@clairo] (May 29, 2018). "B.O.M.D. is also G.O.M.D. for ur information" (Tweet). Archived from the original on August 17, 2022. Retrieved December 20, 2022 – via Twitter.
  79. ^ Bennett, Willa (May 27, 2019). "Clairo Opens Up About Coming Out And Coming into Her Own". Them. Archived from the original on November 1, 2020. Retrieved October 7, 2019.
  80. ^ Strauss, Matthew (May 23, 2024). "Clairo Announces New Album Charm, Shares New Song "Sexy to Someone"". Pitchfork. Retrieved May 23, 2024.
  81. ^ "Velvet Underground – Just another WordPress site". Velvet Underground. Retrieved August 13, 2023.
  82. ^ Shaffer, Claire (August 5, 2019). "Clairo Announces North American Headlining Tour". Rolling Stone. Retrieved August 13, 2023.
  83. ^ Martoccio, Angie (July 20, 2021). "Clairo Maps 2022 North American Tour in Support of 'Sling'". Rolling Stone. Retrieved August 13, 2023.
  84. ^ Sharpe, Josh. "Clairo to Play Los Angeles and New York Residency". BroadwayWorld.com. Retrieved May 29, 2024.
  85. ^ "2018 Nominees". Boston Music Awards. Archived from the original on October 10, 2020. Retrieved November 18, 2019.
  86. ^ Marotta, Michael (December 13, 2018). "Here are the winners from the 2018 Boston Music Awards". Vanyaland. Archived from the original on April 23, 2021. Retrieved November 18, 2019.
  87. ^ "2019 Nominees". Boston Music Awards. Archived from the original on November 8, 2021. Retrieved November 18, 2019.
  88. ^ "2019 Winners". Boston Music Awards. Archived from the original on May 16, 2021. Retrieved December 14, 2019.
  89. ^ BBC Radio 1 [@BBCR1] (December 19, 2019). "At No. 5 in this year's Hottest Record of the Year vote is @clairo with Bags "Clairo really broke through this year with her debut album Immunity. Bags is the song that really caught everyone's attention" "We're delighted for her, and delighted for her fans" - @AnnieMac https://t.co/B3ZwSdrJRO" (Tweet). Archived from the original on May 27, 2022. Retrieved December 20, 2022 – via Twitter.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  90. ^ Rowley, Glenn (February 13, 2020). "2020 NME Awards Winners: The Complete List". Billboard. Retrieved February 14, 2020.

External links[edit]