Clan Anstruther

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Clan Anstruther
Clan member crest badge - Clan Anstruther.svg
Crest: Two arms in armour holding a pole-axe with both hands gauntleted Proper
Motto Periissem ni periissem (I would have perished had I not persisted)
Profile
Region Lowlands
District Fife
Chief
Anstruther of that Ilk arms.svg
Tobias Alexander Anstruther of that Ilk [1]
Chief of the Name and Arms of Anstruther
Seat Balcaskie House.[2]

Clan Anstruther is a Scottish clan.[3]

History[edit]

Origin of name[edit]

From the town of Anstruther, which was adopted as a familial name.

Origins of the clan[edit]

Alexander I of Scotland granted the lands of Anstruther to William de Candela in the early 12th century.[3] There are a number of suggested origins for William but research points to the Normans in Italy.[3] It is known that William I of England sought assistance from William, Count of Candela, who sent his son.[3] It is likely that this son was William de Candela, who received the grant of land from Alexander.[3]

William de Candela's son, also William, was a benefactor to the monks of Balmerino Abbey.[3] The site now occupied by the Scottish Fisheries Museum in Anstruther was a gift from William.[3] The next generation of the family, Henry, no longer styled himself, de Candela, being described as 'Henricus de Aynstrother dominus ejusdem' in a charter confirming grants of land to Balmerino Abbey.[3]

Henry Anstruther accompanied Louis IX of France to the crusades and swore fealty to King Edward I of England in 1292 and again in 1296.[3]

15th and 16th centuries[edit]

In 1483, Andrew Anstruther of Anstruther confirmed the right to a barony and fought against the English at the Battle of Flodden in 1513 during the Anglo-Scottish Wars.[3] Andrew Anstruther married Christina Sandilands who was descended from Princess Jean or Joanna, daughter of Robert II of Scotland.[3] His second son, David, fought at the Battle of Pavia in 1520 in the service of Francis I of France in the French Scots Regiment.[3] This line ended with the death of the last Baron d'Anstrude in 1928.[3]

Andrew's great-great-grandson, Sir James Anstruther was chosen as a companion to the young James VI of Scotland, who appointed him Hereditary Grand Carver,[4] a title still held by the head of the family today.[3] In 1595 he became Master of the Household.[4]

17th century and the Civil War[edit]

William, the elder son of Sir James Anstruther, accompanied Sir James to London following the Union of the Crowns in 1603 where he was made a Knight of the Order of the Bath.[3] Sir James's second son, Sir Robert, served as a diplomat for both James I and Charles I.[5]

Sir Phillip Anstruther, the second son of Sir Robert fought as a royalist during the civil war, and received Charles II at Dreel Castle after his coronation at Scone in 1651.[3] Phillip Anstruther was later taken prisoner after the Battle of Worcester in 1651.[3][5] He was excluded from Cromwell's Act of Grace and his estates were confiscated. They were restored to him after the restoration of the monarchy by Charles II.[6] Phillip's brother Sir Alexander Anstruther married the Hon. Jean Leslie, daughter of the General David Leslie, Lord Newark.[3]

Clan chief[edit]

The Chief of Clan Anstruther is Tobias Alexander Campbell Anstruther of that Ilk and of Balcaskie.[1]

Clan castles[edit]

The clan chief's seat remains at Balcaskie in Fife which was probably built in around 1670 by Sir William Bruce.[3] Airdrie House and Newark Castle in Fife also belong to the Anstruthers.

Clan profile[edit]

  • Crest: Two arms in armour holding a pole-axe with both hands gauntleted Proper
  • Motto: Periissem ni periissem (I would have perished had I not persisted)

See also[edit]

External links[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b http://www.clanchiefs.org/p/chiefs.html
  2. ^ myclan.com
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s Way, George and Squire, Romily. (1994). Collins Scottish Clan & Family Encyclopedia. (Foreword by The Rt Hon. The Earl of Elgin KT, Convenor, The Standing Council of Scottish Chiefs). pp. 66 - 67.
  4. ^ a b Burke, John Bernard (1852). A genealogical and heraldic dictionary of the peerage and baronetage of the British (14 ed.). Colburn. p. 27. 
  5. ^ a b Burke, John Bernard (1852). A genealogical and heraldic dictionary of the peerage and baronetage of the British (14 ed.). Colburn. p. 28. 
  6. ^  Rigg, James McMullen (1885). "Anstruther, William". In Stephen, Leslie. Dictionary of National Biography. 2. London: Smith, Elder & Co.